Headed north to the Trans-taiga Road

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Scanning4adv, Apr 6, 2019.

  1. Scanning4adv

    Scanning4adv Adventurer Supporter

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    Two of us are headed north at the end of June. Taking the James Bay Road north to the Trans-taiga Road. I will post our final planning before leaving, and a ride report after. Please feel free to give any advice, as I haven’t seen many recent reports.
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  2. John F

    John F Been here awhile

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    If the road is wet, stay away from the inside of the curves. The slight slope to the road lets the fine stuff drift to the inside of the curve where it settles out and forms a really slick layer of mud. If it’s dry, you’re fine. If it’s wet, watch out.
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  3. John F

    John F Been here awhile

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    Amazing how quiet this thread is, considering it’s the freakin’ TransTaiga.

    I would strongly recommend riding the road south out of Brisay in addition to the road north to the dams at Caniapiscau. Everybody goes to Caniapiscau, but very few people do the south road. It’s 70 miles that dead ends at a point that is furthest by road from any city or town in North America, and it’s significant less traveled than the rest of the TT. You want remote? This is it.

    There’s gas at Mirage and gas at Air Saguenay at Caniapiscau. Best to call ahead to Air Saguenay when you’re at Mirage to be sure they’ve got gas. It’s a long walk if you don’t have the range for an out n back.
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  4. Lostb4found

    Lostb4found wrk2ride

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    I rode the trans taiga in 2015. first long ride. from what I remember the trip is pretty straight forward. hope you like pine trees
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  5. LosTabarnacos

    LosTabarnacos Adventurer

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    We did it in august 2018. Since it was pouring rain we stayed at Mirage Outfitter, an oasis along the Transtaiga ( km 358)



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  6. Scanning4adv

    Scanning4adv Adventurer Supporter

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    Thanks much for the info. Received some new gear this week last, more to order this week. I need to get it all together....to plan where to put it, straps etc.
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  7. Scanning4adv

    Scanning4adv Adventurer Supporter

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    Planning on riding the extra 70 miles....depending on conditions.
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  8. Scanning4adv

    Scanning4adv Adventurer Supporter

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    I have a BMW GSA 2011, so my fuel will be 8.7 gallons plus I will be carrying 1.75 gal extra.
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  9. The Sexy Medic

    The Sexy Medic Adventurer

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    Hey guys, I wish you the best of luck! I'm planning on doing the "True North East" route immediately prior to the Fundy Adventure Rally (https://www.graveltravel.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3&Itemid=21) .

    This route starts in New Brunswick and culminates in the completion of the Trans Taiga. Like the website says, the riding is not challenging so much as it is logistically difficult. What are you folks rigging up for carrying your extra fuel?
    I'm interested to hear about your trip!
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  10. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    Yes, best of luck. I'll be following your exploits.

    I was hoping to try for the TTR in about mid July, but turns out the wife's bad back is actually two cracked vertebrae. I'll be sitting out this summer, no trips more than about 4 days for me.

    Starting the planning for 2020 though, so anyone who might be stupid enough to join me, I mean interested?
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  11. Scanning4adv

    Scanning4adv Adventurer Supporter

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    Medic, nice ride report. We were looking for something truly different, but doable with a weeks vacation. Photos added showing the Rotopax, 1.75 gallon, using ROX straps. I’m planning on only packing the dry bag, fuel, and my hard bags. Planning on camping at least a couple of nights ...so my dry bag has a sleeping bag, pad, and tent. Concerned about the road being rideable...do to grading or weather. I think I have enough fuel, but still a concern. Motopsychoman, sorry you can’t this year....I’m hoping nothing happens....our health....bikes etc. , to change our plans. I’m not a motocross guy, I’ve been running local gravel roads to prepare.

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    #11
  12. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    """"".so my dry bag has a sleeping bag, pad, and tent. ''''''

    I've mentioned this before when people talk about packing a tent in a dry bag with their bedding and clothes.

    It is poor practice to pack a used tent in an airtight dry bag .
    The tent up in Quebec will usually be damp or wet from dew and or rain and have organic matter all over it from snails and bugs which escaped getting cleaned off as you packed up in the gray morning .It is unlikely that every night will be without dew ,or that you will wait around for the sun to come out to dry it all completely. The inside of the tent may be damp from your condensed breath . Inside a confined dry bag the temperature will rise if exposed to daylight and it will create a good place for fungi to begin growing and stinking up your clean clothes and bedding . A tent in a dry bag may make sense if you are on a wild water rafting trip and expect to get dumped overboard or if you intend to ford a river with the the bike submerged .
    On a motorcycle ride it will be good enough to strap the tent down inside only its nylon carry pouch . The tent textile is water resistant and will not soak up significant water if it is exposed to rain and in fact it will air out and dry somehwat while riding . If it rains while you are setting up it will get wet anyway .
    If you keep it outside a dry bag it will also be easier to take it out without always rearranging all the dry bag stuffings which you really don't need at that time
    #12
  13. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    I agree that your tent and sleeping bag shouldn't be in a dry bag together.
    My down sleeping bag goes in its own compression dry sack and travels in a pannier.
    My clothes have their own compression dry sack and travels in a pannier.
    My tent is in its nylon bag. When the whole tent is dry, the nylon bag goes into a 20+ liter dry bag. When the fly is wet, the fly goes into the nylon bag tied to the back and the rest of the tent goes into the dry bag. When the whole tent is wet, the larger dry bag is empty.

    Also, you don't need to drop BIG bucks on some adventure motorcycle dry bag. I really like the Event compression dry sacks for my sleeping bag and clothes and buy inexpensive rubberized canvas dry bags from the local boating supply for the larger, exposed dry bag.
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  14. John F

    John F Been here awhile

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    I just use one dry bag as a stuff sack for my sleeping bag and one dry bag for my sleeping pad and clothes. Soft, bulky, and light, they both strap to the seat behind me and give me something to lean on during the long drones on the highway. My tent gets strapped to the top of one of my panniers whether it’s wet or dry. Even setting it up totally saturated in the pouring rain, a quick wipe of the floor with a towel before laying out my pad and bag keeps me dry.
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  15. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    I've mastered putting up the tent frame and rain fly and then raising/lowering the tent body underneath it. Takes longer but I can usually keep the inside of the tent entirely dry.
    But yes, dry bag, tent and chair sit where the passenger would and made a great back rest.
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  16. Scanning4adv

    Scanning4adv Adventurer Supporter

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    Thanks for the info on the tent, I just need to figure out a way to strap I on ....now that it won’t be in the dry bag.
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  17. GregCo3000

    GregCo3000 Adventurer

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    What are your dates? I am headed up that way with two of my buds, leaving from Philadelphia on the 28th. I wonder if we'll cross paths...
    We're taking an extra 6 gallon fuel capacity each - Air Sagueney sounds somewhat unreliable, so we're just planning for the worst case.
    Are you heading West to the bay?
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  18. Scanning4adv

    Scanning4adv Adventurer Supporter

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    We willl be leaving from Michigan on Friday June 21st. Start the Trans-taiga on perhaps Monday...depending on weather etc. I think we will miss crossing paths by a few days. It would have been great if we could have met. As for fuel, we plan on Marage on the Trans-taiga. From there to the end and back to Marage should be just short of 400 miles. Our GSA’s have 8.7 gallons, I am carrying an extra 1.75 gal., my brother an extra 3-4 gallons.
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  19. John F

    John F Been here awhile

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    You should have absolutely no problem doing an out and back to the end from Mirage if you can’t get fuel at Air Saguenay. 99.9% certain you will be able to. And definitely do, so you can also do the road south from Brisay. It’s 55 miles each way from Brisay to the dams at the north end of the reservoir. But it’s 70 miles each way to the end of the road south from Brisay. Best scenery of the whole trip, and orders of magnitude more remote than the rest of the TransTaiga.
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  20. Scanning4adv

    Scanning4adv Adventurer Supporter

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    Head north today. Had a customer outing at Arcadia the South Course. In St Ignace, headed to Canada tomorrow.

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