Header's packing list

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by header, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. header

    header Chris

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,797
    Location:
    Indiana
    I was just looking back through some threads in the trip planning section and found my own, figured I would give an update and some pictures.

    I haven't been going on any long trips, hardly any one nighters either but when I do the rides have been geared for a lot harder off road. Consequently my kit has become very spartin like.

    On my last trip all I brought with me was sleeping gear consisting of the same pad, bag, liner, and bivy I had before, a hydration bag, fanny pack for all my tools, and one light weight insulating layer. Everything else was just my normal cool weather riding gear which hasn't changed from what I listed earlier. The only thing I didn't like was how cold I was riding in the morning at 55mph. I wish I had a vest or just a warmer dualsport jacket, but then it wouldn't have worked well when I was riding the tricky bits. The important thing here, don't camp when its flippin cold you idiot :baldy

    My rides keep me looking for hard off road riding, which around here means you have no trails only "OHV parks". This sucks because you can ride all day at 55+ then when you get there be in some very slow and technical riding that commands a very different kit than the road riding you did earlier. Plus its not like exploring, you can't connect any towns, or old backroads that aren't used anymore. This has been the critical driving factor to minimize my camping kit, I can't enjoy the off road sections enough if I bring much more than this. Especially if its on difficult terrain.

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    I also changed bikes, the KTM works great for an enduro bike and still works well enough for a dualsport. Maintenance is only slightly more involved, however the XR makes a great dualsport bike. Eventually I would like to get another XR or try a KTM 640 adventure for travel and dualsporting simply because its easier to perfect the setup on a bike when its only used for one thing. Plus those bikes are the right tool for the job :deal

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    For heavy off road I am still undecided on what I like for luggage. Panniers (soft ones, hard bags aren't for dirt bikes :nono) seem to be a lot more convienent and can be arranged more forward and lower. To me the biggest advantage is the freedome of movement they could offer. When riding a dirt bike off road properly you will be all over the bike, over the front fender, over the rear fender, leaning to either side, the giantloop doesn't get in the way until you try and go down something extremely steep.

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    I will say this, for dualsporting that front headlight bag works great. Its out of the way, convient to get to, and cheap to boot.

    [​IMG]

    The cockpit has changed again. When I switched to the KTM I decided to give those RAM mounts a try. Low and behold those things work great. I ordered one of Ned's mirrors and got a setup for my GPS60csx. They are very adjustable and can take a beating. I don't even take the ball end off the bike anymore.

    Header.
    #21
  2. RAZR

    RAZR u may run the risks my friend but I do the cutting

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Oddometer:
    11,783
    Location:
    L.A.
    #22
  3. header

    header Chris

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,797
    Location:
    Indiana
    Ha! I've seen your thread in trip planning many times. You have access to a much larger audience then what I have here. Which is fine by me, I just wanted this kind of information out there.


    Thanks! I just upgraded to one of Klim's Valdez jackets. Wow, that thing is nice even for the price. Maybe I should update the thread again while I have the time :scratch
    #23
  4. buduski

    buduski Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2007
    Oddometer:
    145
    Location:
    Morriston, FL
    Just looked in at this thread and thought I'd add some things. First and foremost, I bought a neon green wide mouth bottle to use as a pee jar. In the middle of the night, it's nice to just roll over and fill your jar. Second, I use a Black Diamond First Light single wall tent. Very light and small and easy to set up and take down. I leave the top open several inches and have very little if any condensation. Lastly, I'm getting old, so comfort is high on my list. I use the Big Agnes system with their insulated mattress and two bags; the 40 degree bag and the 50 degree bag. These stuff to very small sizes and give me a wide range of temperatures either singly or using the 50 degree bag as an over-bag for the 40 degree bag. I also take an accordion fold closed cell foam pad for added insulation on cold nights and to sit on at a picnic table.
    #24
  5. DCMC

    DCMC Supermoto Rider

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2012
    Oddometer:
    78
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    Thanks for creating this thread Chris.

    My packing list—based off Dave of Giant Loop's packing philosophy and list—is very similar to yours including Dakar pants, Giant Loop bag, Big Agnes 2.5" insulated pad, GPSMAP 60Cx, and REI minimalist bivy. I chose a plastic tarp over silnylon because it was $10 instead of $60 and I wasn't sure how much I'd use it. I certainly think that if you're going out more than a few times a season it's worth the cost to save space.

    After reviewing your list I've realized I'm taking too many extra clothes that I don't end up using.

    I am curious to hear what you guys do for food and water: Cooking kits seem to take up a lot of space. What do you do to keep the size down if you're cooking, or what do you do to avoid it? Then there's water purification. I haven't had to do this since ~2002 with a bandana, nalgene, and chem tabs at the time. There are a lot of new products now and I'm not sure what works best other than just packing it in.
    #25