Heart of the West ADV 'Roundabout'

Discussion in 'Vendors' started by byways, Dec 2, 2012.

  1. WU7X

    WU7X The Old Fart

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    Here is the setup I will be using. Another participant is using a F150 with a 4WC type slide in camper. A third is going with a built up GMC Sierra and RTT. Have to recheck on what the 4th vehicle is. I'm 72, it's been more than two weeks. ...


    Nanc driving in Cascades.jpeg
    Wish I was young enough to still do it with one of these. Alas, both have been sold. :(

    409E0D9E-3F65-4882-AFFD-458558390A1A.jpeg 723D9B3E-2855-4952-9638-48CB5C10815F.jpeg

    Dale
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  2. byways

    byways byways

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    Wow! That setup is battle-ready indeed, Dale. I am jealous!

    Here is the simple setup we still use when not moto traveling, although the '90 4Runner (retired but still runs perfectly!) has been replaced with an '05. And we now use an ALPS roll-up table. We find that ground-tenting -- apparently a fading genre -- gives us the go-anywhere/camp-anywhere mobility that is essential when documenting routes that are uncertain. Yakima cargo boxes have proven to be a poor product for off-pavement travel, as the plastic soon cracks badly. But we've not found an alternative for secure, weather-sealed rooftop storage. We've used the same MSR 4-season Fusion II tent since 2005.

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  3. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    We did the HOW with a one wheel drive sidecar. A21DD7E8-F053-4D91-95E4-03F47ECF0EA5.jpeg

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    Knowing your rig’s limits is of course critical. There was only one small section just north of Wendover where we had to re-route do to a washout. I only had a little folding shovel to work with and soon gave up on trying to get through. I think our detour only took us an additional three miles or so.
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    I think that when pulling a trailer, high centering at the hitch would be the biggest concern in just a very few spots.
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  4. WU7X

    WU7X The Old Fart

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    I am using a Max Coupler so that if necessary I can slowly drag the hitch across a rock outcrop for a short distance. I have almost 11” of clearance under thr pumpkins on the car and 19” under the trailer. Everyone is retired so we can afford to take it safe and easy. Besides tons of recovery gear I’m adding two genuine NATO 20 L gas cans in a Front Runner holder on top of the box at the front of the trailer. All members of this group are experienced and trustworthy. I bought the trailer a year ago and already have 10 K miles on it. Just had the manufacturer check it out. Also did the 120 K miles tuneup on the rig at Toyota. Both came home with a clean bill of health. Slowly checking the other boxes.
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  5. WU7X

    WU7X The Old Fart

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    Tony, I really like your setup. We did tents for many years. Then switched to RTTs for anther 15 or so. Finally got too old for Wifey to crawl up and down the ladder in the middle of the night. Now on our second trailer. Sure miss the independence of a two axle system though. If I ever win Lotto, we’ll get one of those fancy Sportsmobiles. I want to be on dirt until they put me under it.

    Dale
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  6. WU7X

    WU7X The Old Fart

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    Dang, that looks like fun! What time of the year did you do it? I’m surprised that Drone didn’t tag along.
  7. byways

    byways byways

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    Almost hate to say this, but ... A simple, solid-handled shovel has saved the day so many times when my brain cell failed.

    My four-wheeled clients groan when I also recommend carrying a second spare tire/wheel. I recommend doing so because tires typically are not only punctured "out there," but often are damaged by roadbed objects that cause un-repairable damage ...

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    If you have just one spare, and you get an un-repairable flat, and you mount the spare ... you then no longer have a spare. (If you're in a group that includes multiple vehicles with the same lug-bolt pattern, this may not be an issue.) Then, you have a decision to make: Carry on, and risk a second flat far from help (It happens!) ... Or abort that leg of the journey, and head to Hooterville and pay any price for any tire that fits, so that you again have a spare.

    A difficult issue is how to carry a second, 75-lb spare tire & wheel. Solutions -- e.g., a rear hitch-mounted swing-out carrier -- are expensive. But man, does it feel good knowing it's there ...
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  8. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    It was much better than the CDR we did the year before. Routes like the CDR tend to try to get you from point to point on as much dirt as possible. Tony's routes not only take route you on as much dirt as possible, but through interesting or beautiful routes, he seriously takes that into consideration. We did a couple of the extra alternate routes too including the optional 01-d, Idaho into Montana where the largest herd of elk I've ever seen crossed tight in front of us, there must of been at least 80 of them! Of course they were there and gone before I could get my camera out and SWMBO just sat there in awe with her mouth agape.


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    We did it in mid September which put us at the very front of bow season. Two things I had not thought about was traffic from hunters scouting and also outfitters taking up camping spots in Idaho and Wyoming.

    I have yet to meet Drone face to face, but we do a lot of similar trips.
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  9. WU7X

    WU7X The Old Fart

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    Tony,

    We are taking all of your advice to heart. I already have a spare under the T4R and one on the trailer. I made sure when i ordered the trailer that the lug pattern matched my tow rig. I've strongly recommended that everyone else carry two spares. I bought a new Viair 400RV air compressor with extended length hoses and a SafeJack with the add-ons. Everyone is carrying tire patch kits, etc. I am looking for a nice shovel right now. It will be mounted on the roofrack where we have quick access to it. I have also specified to all attendees that every vehicle has to have a 2 meter ham radio in it, and that at least one person per rig must have their Technician or better ham license.

    Today I will be deleting the updated Google Earth app from my Mac and uploading the older version you write about. I'll then download your tracks on it and will begin searching for good campsites for the four vehicles. We're about a month and one-half out so still have time to do this right. We have all our fingers crossed that everyone stays healthy and the public lands stay open. One thing I've recommended to the group is that we will alternate lead vehicles on a daily basis. This will give everyone a chance to ensure we stay on the track and give the others more time to enjoy the scenery. My navigator/travel companion, Kent is probably the best person I have ever met in reading maps on the run. In past trips he kept me informed of the names of mountain ranges, rivers and stream, POIs, etc. That leaves me time to focus on the road directly ahead. 2 meters will let us share this type of info among other things. My primary software app is Gaia GPS on an 9.7" iPad. It is mounted in front of and in the center of the dash. At least two others will be using the same program. Overlapping like this really makes navigation much easier. Oh, several of us also carry inReach satellite GPS and communications devices. I have one of the original DeLorme SE models and Garmin still supports it. Great way to stay in touch with family when out of cell tower coverage. It is also synced with the iPad, so it is just a matter of pushing the enter button on the iPad to switch from Gaia to inReach. I will switch to unlimited texts and probably get the weather report function activated the beginning of Sept. The inReach is glass mounted next to the A piller on the driver's side. I have it set for tracking and location. So family knows exactly where we are located within 10 minutes of travel time, and I know our elevation. The head of my Icom IC7100 will be mounted on a stalk on the passenger side next to the transmission tunnel. That way it will be available to be me and Kent. I'm mounting the body and an antenna tuner for a Little Tarheel II on a Victory 4X$ Molle plate that covers the rear driver's side window. That should provide it good ventilation, easy access, and out of the way from stuff tied down behind the rear seat.

    I'm already thinking that once we get the HOTW completed I'll set my sights on that trip of yours that ends up on the n. CA coast!
  10. WU7X

    WU7X The Old Fart

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    Strong Bad,

    great pic! It makes me even more anxious to get going! Looks like we're starting off just a week or so ahead of your schedule. I assume we will also run into hunters, etc. Hope we can find enough camping space for the four rigs and two trailers every night! We are all pretty much self contained; water, porta potties, food, etc. So all we need is enough open space. I hope that the Google Earth maps will help our planning in that respect.

    Fender & Slider.jpg

    Drone is a very nice guy. Typical engineer if you know what I mean. I've contacted him several times requesting advice and he has always delivered.

    You've got me interested in 01-d! Will be checking it out. thanks!

    BTW, how did you get your wife to do the HOTW in a sidecar with you? My wife would rather hang wallpaper every day for a month straight than do one mile of dusty, mountainous, corrogated road.
  11. byways

    byways byways

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    You're hired!

    This is impressive leadership. Many can benefit from your example. Meeting this group is going to be the highlight of this season! :thumb
  12. WU7X

    WU7X The Old Fart

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    Tony, you are giving me a swell head. Truth is I'm 72 and forgetful. Plus a bit OCD :lol3 So I have to get all my ducks in a row as much as possible. Dividing the daily drive leadership, for example, shares the responsibility and eases the burden. Plus it is a great learning experience for everyone. Everyone doing this is pretty much in the same situation. We all love getting out and enjoying the beauty of the natural world. So many unfortunate souls never get or take the opportunity to do so. I take a lot of pictures, we all do. Looking at them next winter when there is 2 feet of snow on the ground is something to look forward to!
  13. byways

    byways byways

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    No talk of winter allowed here, Dale! :ban
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  14. Strong Bad

    Strong Bad Former World's Foremost Authority Supporter

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    One of the things I learned doing both the HOW and the CDR is that it is pretty hard to judge your pace that allows precise preplanning for camp spots. We camp for 4 nights and on the 5th we stay in a motel, shower, re supply our pantry and do laundry. Expect to have to deviate from your plan and be flexible and you will won’t be disappointed. We do these trips solo and disperse camp whenever possible. Once we get up into brown bear country, we tend to seek out campgrounds with other people. Campgrounds are nice with having bear boxes. Hanging your food in the trees can be a pain.

    Actually the sidecar was SWMBO’s idea and she she loves traveling and prefers camping. One of the reasons I married her!
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  15. WU7X

    WU7X The Old Fart

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    I hope you realize just how fortunate you are. Catch you on the trail some time.
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  16. tyrebitr

    tyrebitr jus wanna ride

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    I believe that 4th vehicle would be mine, Tacoma with a FWC.
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  17. WU7X

    WU7X The Old Fart

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    Hi James! glad you checked this out. Please feel free to add anything, question Tony, etc., to your heart's content.

    Dale
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  18. byways

    byways byways

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    [​IMG]

    While recently revisiting little-traveled Oregon Trail segments of Heart of the West Adventure Route for my annual inspection tour and updates, I paused at the grave of emigrant Lucinda B. Wright, 47, wife of Thomas Huston Wright and mother of seven. She died and was buried beside the Sublette Cutoff on June 25, 1853, along what remains even today a remote and windy 45-mile stretch of two-track across Wyoming's sagebrush steppe.

    The cause of death was unknown, but many emigrants died of cholera contracted in squalid encampments along the trail, which much of H.o.W. follows.

    Her nephew and fellow emigrant John G. Wright recalled the incident:

    "Uncle Huston's wife died on the Green River desert and was buried on the side of the road. I shall never forget how desolate we felt as we hitched up the oxen and pulled out, leaving the freshly broken earth by the side of the Old Oregon Trail as the only visible sign that one of our number had finished the journey, while we must still travel on. There were four families of us that stopped to bury my aunt, in a blanket in a shallow grave, with a few feet of earth and the wide sky over her."

    The Wright wagon train arrived at Salem, Oregon, on September 15, 1853.
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  19. DYNOBOB

    DYNOBOB lucky dog Supporter

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    Great story Tony.

    We just returned from a 2 week trip with the 9yr old grandbuddy that incorporated some of the H.o.W track. I'd previously told him the story of the Donner Party so it was pretty cool to take him to The Parting of the Ways. As we drove the covered wagon tracks we discussed what it would have felt like to be moving at 1 mph across this wilderness for months and months. I never would have known that this historic spot still existed without H.o.W.

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    He also enjoyed the swinging bridge :)

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    .
  20. byways

    byways byways

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    DynoBob! It's so great to see you're still at it. Your ride report remains one of the best ever. Keep on truckin', my friend ... :clap
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