heated gear

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by szramer, Oct 15, 2018.

  1. ChaoSS402

    ChaoSS402 Been here awhile

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    Most heat loss comes from the extremities. It's also easier to insulate your core than your hands without making it hard to operate your controls.

    I have a heated vest, it does nothing for my hands. I added heated grips and often used them before the vest. This year I'll be looking at gloves.
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  2. allowishish

    allowishish Boof Master

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    it is physiology of the body.
    If your core is cold the body will divert blood to keep your core (where your vital organs are located) warm. Thereby reducing blood flow to the extremities.
    if your core is warm it will continue to send blood elsewhere.
    (note that I did say to a degree in my previous post)

    Having warm hands and feet will do next to nothing to warm your core, you will have warm hands and feet while your core is cold...sooner or later with this scenario you WILL wind up hypothermic.

    Most heat loss comes from the head.
    Hands and feet are at the extreme ends of your "extremities" and are a fraction of the surface area of such.



    yes I use my heated grips before I use my heated vest. But my vest (and everyone else's) does more to prevent hypothermia that the grips and gloves could ever do.


    Cold hands suck. absolutely. hence the use of handle bar muffs... I maintain hand warmth and full feel of the controls, all without extra bulky gloves. But Hypothermia sucks even more and warm hands do not prevent hypothermia.
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  3. krassh

    krassh Adventurer

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    I recently purchased some First Gear liners for me and my wife. Went with the jacket liner and pants liner. Has worked well so far. Probably going the next step and getting heated socks and glove liners.

    These are my first heated gear and I've only used them twice so far to good results. Main reason was for extending my riding season here in PA.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
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  4. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes Supporter

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    I found a couple of times, when on trips with friends and we are all getting rained-on and frozen, having heated grips has helped me to stay warmer, more comfortable and more alert than the guys without them. I have even donated my winter gloves and ridden in wet mesh gloves but with heated grips on max.
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  5. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Love those blue pipes Supporter

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    Do you know if those Kolpin mitts will fit over hand-guards? I'd like to have a set to throw on one or other of my bikes if I venture out in especially foul weather but they would need to fit over the stock guards on either a KTM 1290 or V strom. Wished I had some mitts, riding Alaska in Jun a couple of times.
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  6. szramer

    szramer Been here awhile

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    well just instaled heated grips that been sitting a while on a shelf , going camping over weekend and ride some +200 miles at 30-50F range , will see...
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  7. nk14zp

    nk14zp Long timer

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    My bike came with heated grips and I just got a heated liner from an inmate. Has anyone used any bar mits with the HDB handguards with the flip out mirrors?
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  8. PineLaneRider

    PineLaneRider Been here awhile

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    I have these on a VStrom and they fit over the Pollisport guards, no problem. I did need to cut a small hole for my mirror stalks.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
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  9. Daboo

    Daboo Been here awhile

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    I recommend watching this video on YouTube.



    Based on that video and seeing the coverage of the Venture jacket liner, that's what my next one will be. I also liked how the sleeves stay close to your arms. Mine with a Gerbing liner get a little cold at times.

    I used to think that the Gerbing gloves were the best. I think I'd look elsewhere next time. With heated grips, I'd like a glove with the heated wires on the back of the hand and minimal insulation on the palm. The heated grips can take care of that.

    I've found my hands will get cold down below 30F. The Gerbing gloves have some ventilation built in so your hands don't sweat. That same breathability makes them cold when the temp gets low enough. I picked up some Aerostitch three-fingered gloves on sale for $39 this week. They are a rain shell, but will also keep the cold wind off of the gloves and give me some more range.

    Chris
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  10. nwbobber

    nwbobber Adventurer

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    Gordon Gerbings kids started a company called Gordons Heated Clothing, all made in USA. My wife and I bought jackets from them, and they work well. In the low 30's my hands get cold, with bmw's heated grips, I think hippo hands are my next investment. With the jacket and the heated grips, I'm good to 35 degrees.
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  11. BoilerRealm

    BoilerRealm Been here awhile

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    Would the warm and safe waterproof heated liner under a mesh jacket be good down to the 30’s, or would the wind flow through the mesh negate the effectiveness?
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  12. ChaoSS402

    ChaoSS402 Been here awhile

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    Might work with another later between them, but for come cold conditions it's best to block the wind with the outer layer.
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  13. GravelRider

    GravelRider AKA max384 Supporter

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    If you're cold enough to worry about hypothermia, heating the core is the only way to go. However, the core is the easiest part of your body to keep warm with or without heated gear. Your extremities are the most difficult due to the high surface area to volume ratio and being furthest from your heart and the high relative blood flow (conversely, your core has the lowest body surface area to volume ratio). Your feet are often easier to keep warm on a bike because they are inside a boot within a sock, as opposed to your hands which are exposed to the cold and wind much more, with each finger wrapped individually in the glove fingers (unless you're wearing mittens).

    If your core is not cold, heating your core with a vest will not help to warm your extremities much. The body's response to a drop in core temperature change is to constrict blood vessels to the extremities, as you mentioned. The body's response to cold extremities in the face of normal core body temperatures is dilation of the blood vessels to the extremities. The point here is that if you're bundled up and only cold in your extremities, you already have maximal or near maximal blood flow to your hands and feet. Furthermore, with the increased blood flow to your extremities, the heat dissipation is greatly increased, which actually does rob your body's core of heat.

    Most heat loss does NOT come from the head. That's an old wive's tale. Heat loss is roughly equivalent to body surface area. The body surface area of your hands is roughly equivalent to your head. However, this being said, the blood flow to surface area ratio of your hands is 4-5 times higher than the rest of your body, meaning the hands play a disproportionate role in heat dissipation (which is a problem in the cold). You can think of them as radiator fins, of sorts. However, thermal sensation is highest in the face and head, which makes us feel more miserable if our face or head are cold compared to other parts of the body, without actually having a significant effect on whole body heat loss.

    The bottom line is that your heated gear purchase should be based on need. Hands cold? Buy heated gloves. Feet cold? Buy heated socks. Core is cold? Buy a heated jacked.

    I was on a trip to Newfoundland several years ago and I came across a couple of guys from Nova Scotia. We got to talking about gear and they asked about my gloves (which were the old Gerbings gloves). They then told me that I should have bought a heated vest, because that would do a better job of heating my core due to better blood flow to my hands. I tried to explain the physiology to them, explaining that I was perfectly warm in my entire body, except my hands, so why would I remedy the situation by heating other parts of my body? They held their stance until I posed this scenario to them: If you were at room temperature with your hands dipped in an ice bath, would you rather turn up the heat in the room, or remove your hands from the cold water? It clicked then.

    By the way, if anyone is interested in reading more about the physiology of this, check out this paper. If you don't have a background in anatomy, physiology, biology, or similar, it may read a bit dense, but it's a good synopsis. https://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewconte.../&httpsredir=1&article=1201&context=hbspapers
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  14. GravelRider

    GravelRider AKA max384 Supporter

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    It depends on how fast you're going, how far you're going, how your body responds to cold, and how much other gear you're wearing. If you're talking about a quick jaunt to the convenient mart down the street, you'll be fine. If you're talking all day comfort on the interstate, you'll likely fall way short of being comfortable. I'd imagine you probably fall somewhere in between those two scenarios though.

    The warm and safe jacket liner is made of a wind blocking material, but I've never worn it without another barrier over it, so I can't really say whether that would be effective or not. Does your mesh jacket have a waterproof liner or anything that snaps in place?
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  15. dietDrThunder

    dietDrThunder Why so serious, son? Supporter

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    I've been using the HotWired Cycle Gear stuff in conjunction with a Warm n Safe wireless controller for a couple of years now, and it all works great. The effectiveness of the gear is highly fit-dependent. Don't go loose; the closer it is to your skin the better it works. It's not designed to heat up the voids between you and your gear; it needs to be against you to work (not skin, against your clothing is fine).
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  16. RoadRdr

    RoadRdr Been here awhile

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    I have the WarmnSafe jacket liner. It’s an older version but still works great. I also have both the WnS heated gloves and glove liners. I use the glove liners because they fit under a decent pair of middle weight gloves and I prefer this over the bulkier heated gloves. I also have heated grips on the bike and the wind/brush guards.

    I keep thinking I want the heated pants liners. I’d like thin ones similar to the newest WnS shirt.
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  17. Jimo368

    Jimo368 Quantum Mechanic

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    I have an assortment of stuff and it seems to all work together. I bought it when I see a sale. I also have the Aerostich inflatable heated vest but find my arms get cold. Nice thing about it though is I had a section burn out and they repaired it for about $30. Try finding another company that does that.
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  18. VACommuter

    VACommuter Long timer

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    Very satisfied with my Gerbing vest with one issue. Whenever I use my Gerbing gloves with the vest its a PITA to thread the cables up the jacket sleeves. Sometimes I wish I got the full heater jacket liner. But, works great for several years now and I commute almost every single day year round.
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  19. Johnny Twoshoes

    Johnny Twoshoes n00b

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    Has anyone tried the new Warm n Safe heated shirt? I like the looks of it, it seems like it would keep the heat super close to your body and allow for a nice warm outer layer to be put on top of it for those really cold rides.
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  20. Olde Phart

    Olde Phart Olde Phart

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    I recently purchased an Aerostich Kanetsu AirVantage vest along with a heat troller:

    http://www.aerostich.com/clothing/h...rostich-kanetsu-airvantage-electric-vest.html
    http://www.aerostich.com/clothing/heated-gear/cords-accessories/aerostich-sae-thermostat.html

    and find the combination sooooooo nice (in addition to heated grips) when riding in the cold. The airvantage vest has an inflation tube (kinda like an airline flotation vest where you gotta puff into the tubes once outside of the aircraft) that allows you to fill the internal bladder to fill the voids between you and your top garment and pushes the heating elements against your body. It is very nice ....

    With it under the leathers with a good base layer between it and the skin, I find I don't usually turn it on until it gets below 50 deg. F. The "dial-a-temp" feature of the heat troller is well worth the additional expense.

    Good heated ridin' to ya!
    #40