Heated Grips

Discussion in 'Dakar champion (950/990)' started by Ignore Amos, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. NothingClever

    NothingClever Dirt Winger

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,115
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    I thought I'd post my installation steps and photos. This is another mod that's easy but high-payoff if you ride year 'round.

    1) Remove the headlight:

    Some will argue this is not necessary. However, I like to have room to see what I'm doing and I don't have much patience for trying to tug on wires to splice in or try to do something by feel while I stick my tongue halfway out my mouth and make strange faces :lol3 .

    Also, and more importantly, I wanted to rig my grips to be "switched hot" which means that I want to run power to the on/off toggle from something that is already in the loom. I chose the parking light out of habit & safety but also because I wanted to save the ACC1 (always hot) & ACC2 (switched hot) for other stuff in the future.

    2) Cut off the old grips, prep the new grips & install the clutch-side heat sink barrier:

    I picked up some Pro-Grip rally grips which I used on my Dakar. They're extremely durable and comfortable so I thought I'd give them a shot on the Katoom.

    I use a socket on a 6" extension & a rubber mallet to cut the end holes in my grips. Motion Pro sells a tool for U$D20 or so....knock yourselves out (no pun intended). I'm a cheap bastard.

    I used a heat-shrink tube from a ground cable splicing kit. Measure twice and cut once as they say. You'll need to use some kind of lubricant like contact cement or hairspray and work quickly as this one is a tight fit. Coat the inside of the tube and the handlebar, too (the outside of the handlebar, you ninny....). Take your handguard insert out to prevent the heat shrink tube from hanging up.

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    3) Apply the heated elements, route the wires & fit the connections:

    I didn't follow the manufacturer's instructions which tell you to position the wire at the 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock positions (throttle side and clutch side respectively as you're looking at the end of the bar). I've found that rotating the elements back just a bit helps keep my hands warmer, kinda like the time I was able to cross Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa and Illinois on a January day when it was about 14F....YMMV.

    Use something to make sure the 3M VHB glue sets up evenly and doesn't pull away. Some people use tape but I didn't want to have to clean up a bunch of goo later.

    No brainer on the wires. Follow the exisiting bundles down to the steering head tube and out to the front where you'll connect.

    I used dielectric grease and heat-shrink tubing. I'm kinda fastidious as nothing would piss me off more than losing connectivity because of corrosion or crappy connections.

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    4) Drill the port for the toggle switch, install the switch and connect Hi-Low setting wires:

    I used the hi-lo switch marker as a template to see where I could drill without having to take the instrument cluster apart. Down low in the little triangle like everybody else did it looked cool but it was kinda late, I was kinda lazy and so I put it up top where I could easily get to it now and later with winter gloves while riding. I know, I know - all you guys with plans of racing your 950 in the next Por Las Pampas as a warm up to your Dakar effort are going to call me a Dirt Winger. But hey, what can I say? I gotta be me, you know :D ?

    Also, start out slow. Use a center punch to mark where you're going to drill, drill a pilot hole and check your work behind the instrument shroud. Drill a little bigger, then bigger and so on until you're at the right ID.....1/2" or 13mm in this case. Smooth it out with a rat tail file if necessary.

    Connect the wires to the toggle switch and then install the toggle switch. It's too tight behind the shroud to install the switch and then connect the wires so connect the wires first and then slide the toggle in from behind the shroud. You should have an arrangement that looks something like the last two photos.

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    5) Combine the ground wires and hook to the ACC2 ground:

    I couldn't find a suitable place to ground the two red wires (Sym-Tec's ground wires) with the supplied ring terminals. I looked around and found the ACC terminals bundled up on the right subframe (pilot's right). I chose the ACC2 ground wire (standard brown) which was readily accessible & on a switched hot circuit....you can see it in the upper part of the two photos (before splice and after splice). I used another tap-in splice connector from 3M and wrapped it in electrical tape.

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    6) Install a 5-7.5 amp inline fuse into the yellow power wire & tap into the Euro headlight parking light:

    Cut the yellow wire in half and install an inline fuse. I forgot to take a picture but you can see the yellow wire hanging down in one of the above photos. If you've made it this far with me, you're probably on the ball with knowing that you should put a fuse between your power and your demand. This will prevent the small parking bulb from acting as a fuse.

    Next, cut a small piece of the insulation away from the white power wire. Tap in there.

    The fuse also acts as a quick disconnect when you need to take the headlamp off for whatever reason.

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    7) Install grips, test & let glue set up:


    The manufacturer recommends using a 2 part epoxy which is what I have used in the past. Hairspray and a good contact cement will also work. Whatever you use, make sure not to get any underneath your throttle tube.

    Switch on the ignition, turn your parking light on, switch the grips on low and then high and check for heat.

    Woo-hoooo!

    Also, a technique if you use regular cement is to cycle the grips on and off periodically during the day to help the glue cure. Epoxy will set up on its own but the contact cement can take a while. Epoxy is the best but I'm lazy and I had some Thermarest glue sitting on the bench.

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    Cheers!
    #41
  2. woodsrider

    woodsrider .........................

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2003
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    587
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    Colorful Colorado
    Excellent writeup, clever. Thanks for posting -- nice installation.
    #42
  3. RedRupert

    RedRupert Brit in the Soviet Union

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    806
    Location:
    Riga, Latvia / Bergerac, France / Colchester, UK
    I bought a simple rocker switch in my local electrical shop for 1$, then found it fitted nicely between the handlebar and clutch master cylinder.

    A similar switch may fit in the blanking plate that's on the R/H switchgear housing where the European model has a light switch?

    Attached Files:

    #43
  4. NothingClever

    NothingClever Dirt Winger

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2006
    Oddometer:
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    Location:
    Colorado & Colombia
    I liked your switch RedRupert but I don't know if it would like the rain I ride in. No matter what I do or what the weatherman says, I always seem to find a lot of rain :-) . Shorting out wouldn't be the issue if you weatherproof the switch with heat shrink tube and dielectric grease but corrosion and poor contacts could be.

    Also, your idea about fitting a switch in the NA control's blanking plate is excellent but unless you find a switch that has screw type terminals, I don't think there's enough room for blade type terminals to fit in between the plastic housing and the bar....it's pretty tight.

    An external mount switch, like something you glue on, would be pretty cool. The little Trail Tech switch might work. I'm itching to figure out a reason to buy that switch but I'm coming up snake eyes so far......I'm an uncreative farclista.
    #44
  5. mcmann

    mcmann Adventure Rider Junkie Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,902
    Location:
    Jefferson, GA
    The KTM Enduro Engineering Heated Grips have the same size element for the clutch & throttle side. Since the throttle side grip is thinner, it gets hotter (even when pre-wrapping the cluch side bar for insulation). The clutch side needs to be on High to match the throttle side on low.

    Therefore, I eliminated the Hi/Lo switch & mounted an LED rocker switch to the left side hand guard mount bolt and put the Lo side resister in the wire to the throttle grip heating element. Now, I get equal heat and can easily switch off. When the LED light is on - - - the clutch side is on Hi & throttle side is on Lo.

    Yes, next time I will get the Dual Star/ Symtec set - - - but this works well.

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    Attached Files:

    #45
  6. RedRupert

    RedRupert Brit in the Soviet Union

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    Riga, Latvia / Bergerac, France / Colchester, UK
    #46
  7. advjason

    advjason Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 20, 2006
    Oddometer:
    92
    Location:
    East Texas
    How well do the heated grip elements work thru those gel grips? Does enough heat get thru them?

    I had those symmetic elements on my SV and they were pretty worthless below 40deg. We've had some low 20deg days here lately so I bought a pair of the Widder gloves. HUGE difference! My fingers are fairly long and thin and are almost always cold but the gloves keep them from getting that tingly, i'm going to hurt something, feeling on the chilly mornings.
    The gloves were expensive but sure beat the snot out of arriving somewhere... and 2 hrs later my hands are still cold!
    #47
  8. SpeedStar

    SpeedStar XT1200Z and DL650

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Oddometer:
    528
    Location:
    San Diego, Ca
    I have Symtec heaters with Progrip Rally gels and they work fine. You have to use grip glue though because when the gel gets hot they will turn if you only use safety wire.
    #48
  9. markheld

    markheld n00b

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4
    My contribution to this thread is to suggest some grips by a German outfit callled CLS. Certainly not cheap and the grip part itself is Daytona, but the electronics and continuous ambient temperature monitoring works stunningly. I used these last winter on 400 mile round trip in Scotland where the temperature at it's warmest was +2 and at its worst - 6 (centigrade) The trip was organised by WL Gore to prove that you can bike in extremes and the Rukka Gear they provided worked really well, but without the grips it would have been a total no no. More info can be found at http://www.cls200.de/index_e.htm. Whilst the grips are fantastic I decided not to go with their oiler and place ordered one from Pro Oiler. Pain to fit and to set up, but once done equally as brilliant a bit of kit. Winter riding on salt caked roads is no minor issue, but with these two I'm pretty well sorted. Just my bloody feet that freeze now!
    #49
  10. Dust Rider

    Dust Rider Cuttin dust with the Dutch

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
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    Amsterdam Montana
    I used the Symtec grip heaters, and they work good at all temps, pretty cheap too. one of the better features added to the bike.
    #50
  11. Mark0474

    Mark0474 Adventurist at heart

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    Dec 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    97
    Location:
    On a boat somewhere!!
    Anyone know anything about the KTM heated grips?

    Are they any good?

    Thanks, Mark
    #51
  12. Joe Bar

    Joe Bar Middle England

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    #52
  13. Chadd

    Chadd I live in the wrong place

    Joined:
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    Carlyle, IL
    Just an update I have not yet had any issues with this, I think it may depend on what grade tape you use also. I never use anything but 3M super 33 or super 88. I can definately see some of the .99 cent bargin tapes doing this though.
    #53
  14. Mark0474

    Mark0474 Adventurist at heart

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    Oddometer:
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    On a boat somewhere!!
    Thanks for the link to ebay. I will probably get a pair of the symtecs. I like to go on other peoples advice. Any issues fitting them, not done any wiring on bikes. My bike came with power socket, satnav and Autocom already fitted. Do you wire these grips to the battery or through one of the ACC.

    Thanks

    Mark
    #54
  15. Joe Bar

    Joe Bar Middle England

    Joined:
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    Wired mine through the switched ACC wires behind the fairing (no danger of them being left on and draining the battery). I mounted the switch to the right of the clocks, though some on here have fitted it between the clocks which looks quite neat as well.
    #55
  16. Mark0474

    Mark0474 Adventurist at heart

    Joined:
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    Thanks for that BMK

    I have to do a bit of investigating to see what is wired where. My GPS is wired to ACC 2, on and off with ignition, and I think my autocom may be the same. Have not tested the power socket as yet to find out where it is wired. With regards to carb heaters, is there something that I can look at that will tell me if they have been fitted. I havent yet taken off all the fairings to see what lies beneath.

    What do people think of the idea of wiring the heated grips through the parking light as described earliet in this thread? Is this good or bad. I always ride with my lights on regardless.

    Thanks all.
    #56
  17. Joe Bar

    Joe Bar Middle England

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    I wired my GPS to the permanent live ACC1, as you don't leave it on the bike as you walk away!!!!! That left the ACC2 free for my grips.

    Carb heaters were standard from the '05 model year I believe, but if you call your dealer with the frame / reg number he should be able to tell you if they've been done.
    #57
  18. Mark0474

    Mark0474 Adventurist at heart

    Joined:
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    On a boat somewhere!!
    Thanks for that. I will wire mine to ACC 1 and see how all the other bits are wired in.

    Thanks, Mark
    #58
  19. Mark0474

    Mark0474 Adventurist at heart

    Joined:
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    Oddometer:
    97
    Location:
    On a boat somewhere!!
    Symtec's arrived today, great service!! Just a question before I start to do this little job.

    When using an epoxy to fix the grips back on over the heater element, do I cover the whole element in glue or just the ends and where the grips make contact with the bars, throttle tube? If in the uk what glue did everyone esle use? Was it something like a grip glue, araldite, hair spray?????

    Thanks as always,

    Mark
    #59
  20. Joe Bar

    Joe Bar Middle England

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    I didn't use any grip glue, and even on my EXC climbing rocks they've stayed put. My thought was that I'd only be glueing them to the heater elements rather than the bars.

    I did use hairspray to help the grips over the elements though, not mine I hasten to add as I'm a bit thin on top :evil :evil
    #60