Historic Logging Sites and Equipment

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwet - Where it's green. And wet.' started by DiggerD, Mar 14, 2018.

  1. Getnout

    Getnout Mmmmm, Micro Brews!! Supporter

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    Today was my first time visiting the Booth-Kelly Lumber Mill site where Wendling, Oregon used to be. Really enjoyed it and can see searching out our Pacific Northwest logging history becoming an addiction.
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  2. rg sw wa.

    rg sw wa. Long timer Supporter

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    Looks likes you had a great day for exploring and pics. Thanks and keep them coming.
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  3. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

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    Wonderful pictures! The bearing surface in the third pic supported a giant shaft.
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  4. DiggerD

    DiggerD DougFir from SuperDuke Days

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    Had to look up that location...but I have been there.
    Out near Shotgun OHV north east of Eugene.
    Nice area to ride m/c's.

    Ha...a group of us on adv's were making our way thru the paved logging roads heading north thru Shotgun at a sprinted pace a few seasons ago.
    On the down hill side the late summer brush was over growing the road blocking visibility and the pavement had about a 6-8 inch drop.
    So glad we where traveling down hill and going over a step down and not hitting a step up.
  5. Getnout

    Getnout Mmmmm, Micro Brews!! Supporter

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    No doubt. Something large was mounted there. Very cool area to scope out. I can only find one, kinda crappy, aerial photo of this site on the web. I understand there's a local museum, I believe in Marcola, that has more information on it........ hopefully some good photos. Then I'll revisit the site again. Mill closed in the early '50's, then after being closed for a couple years, a fire finished it off. It's amazing how fast mother nature takes things over. Still a great site with hidden Jem's back in the timber.
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  6. dammitdave

    dammitdave Long timer

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    Wow Getnout, that's a fairly modern looking setup for having been idled in the 50's. I poured a few bearings like that for sawmill infeed decks when I worked in Gray's Harbor. Thanks for sharing that. If the governor's holiday doesn't go on too long this summer I'd like to get down to the valley and explore some of these sights. I keep an eye on the Flattail thread, I might have to ask for a guide.
    Anatoli, good eye for your quarry, you've led us to some amazing logging history. That log loader looks the business! That's not just a modified excavator, it looks purpose built. That lighter boom would let you swing dangerously fast on a small log show. I'll leave that to the pros. Thanks both of you for posting! dd
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  7. PNWRR

    PNWRR A study in Mopishness

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    A.K.A. Moss. Excellent post. WFC

    :trp
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  8. Shady Pass David

    Shady Pass David Long timer Supporter

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    Being a retired concrete mixer driver I am always amazed at how they got all these structures built, the same with mines, out in the middles of nowhere's.
    Hats-off for sure!
    Keep exploring and sharing.
    Thanks
  9. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

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    The Alger Washington CCC road today is a short lightly trafficked country road sprinkled with a few residences. The name hints at more. The Civilian Conservation Corps was a Great Depression era make work program designed to feed and reemploy thousands of out of work men across the country. One of the projects undertaken here in Skagit County was the conversion of the abandoned Bloedell-Donovan Lumber Mills mainline to a passable County road. The Alger CCC road, Butler Creek road, and Parson Creek road all began life as part of this mainline that eventually stretched from the log dump at Lake Whatcom to Delvan, at the outskirts of Sedro Woolley, 25 miles away. Winter rains and traffic revealed this railroad tie, probably emplaced around 1903 as Bloedell-Donovan built south through thick timber and cedar swamps towards their new operations headquarters site at Alger. These winding roads are a favorite for riders today as they retrace the route the big timber took to market for 25 years. The curving grade is still visible inside a fenced yard at the intersection of Butler Creek road and Parson Creek road.
  10. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

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    The brand name Packard was synonymous with quality and technical innovation in automobiles from 1899 to the 1950’s. The company introduced several notable features such as the steering wheel, air conditioning, and the first production automotive V12 engine. This was an adaptation of their Liberty L 12 aero engine built for WW 1 service. Packard V12’s also powered John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s famous PT 109 in WW2. Years ago I was able to make my own woods connection with this famous brand.

    In the spring of 1976 I was shopping for property in Skagit County. At the end of Humphrey Hill road an old homestead was available. The house wasn’t much, but the surrounding hilltop acreage was beautiful and contained a nice second growth forest. As I prowled through the underbrush attempting to locate the property corners, I came upon the remains of an early 1930’s Packard automobile. The drive train was missing, but enough of the body remained to see the dual side mount spare tires, 4 doors, and impressive Packard grill shining through the sword ferns. As a young gearhead, I was enchanted with my find.

    A conversation with the property owner revealed a sad tale. Near the end of the 1930’s, the Depression had stripped most people of everything: luxury cars like the Packard could be had for a couple hundred dollars. (My dad bought several in High School). Locals scrounged to get buy, illicit country stills and cedar salvage supplemented farm animals and vegetable gardens. Any iron left in the woods was sold for scrap. The Packard was owned by a young man who, like all the rest, was called to defend our country after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. It was his prized possession, and thinking of that car waiting for his eventual return helped him through a rough 5 years in the Pacific theatre.

    Meanwhile, life was very difficult on the home front. Much of the labor force was gone, and the family was just getting by. Papa had a small shake mill on the property, and one day his Model A engine running the big blade gave up the ghost. The solution lay in that Packard’s engine bay. Soon the mill was running far smoother and faster than ever. Eventually the war ended and the son returned home. Things were never the same between father and son.


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  11. Shady Pass David

    Shady Pass David Long timer Supporter

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    That's a neat background story, Thanks!..
    "F" wars..........
  12. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

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    Ed English was the most prominent logger in Skagit County. He co-founded the present day County seat of Mt. Vernon in 1877 and was in the logging business at Barney Lake and Samish as early as 1882. His English Logging
    Company, just one of his ventures, eventually had 12 camps and stretched from the log dump on the Skagit near Conway to deep in the woods northeast of Lake Cavanaugh. Camp 7 was on Pilchuck Creek, 3 miles east of the Finn Settlement. The Camp operated from 1921 to 1930, but this mainline junction was in service till the end. Recent timber harvest activity has turned up some rail that was missed when the iron was torn up in 1952.
  13. DiggerD

    DiggerD DougFir from SuperDuke Days

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    A brewer and pub owner found some rail near his pub in Yahots on the Oregon coast.

    He is looking for volunteer's to bring said rail out of the woods to add to his bar for a step rail.

    So far I have avoided the volunteerism. :photog


    I'am not as young as I once was....

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  14. Watercat

    Watercat . . . gravity sucks

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    Like in one piece ? ? ? Something like that uncut must be very heavy !
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  15. DiggerD

    DiggerD DougFir from SuperDuke Days

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    I can set you up as a volunteer ?

    10 guys

    10 x 50 = 500

    Doable.....be worth a couple three pints.
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  16. Watercat

    Watercat . . . gravity sucks

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    Uhhhhhhhhmmm . . . . . No thanks, my portion of the lift would definitely be contributing to the ultimate bug-squashing I'd deserve for being so worthless & weak . . . . . .:dunno
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  17. jusbeach

    jusbeach Ramble on Rose

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    Betting it weighs over 60# a foot. Shit is heavy!
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  18. DiggerD

    DiggerD DougFir from SuperDuke Days

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    Not sure if its big or smaller gauge.

    Was with a dirt bike work party that found a foot long section of the smaller gauge used in my riding area, Oregon mid coastal range.

    We gave it to a young kid in the group.

    Don't think it was 60# a foot.

    Would love to have a short section as an anvil.
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  19. jusbeach

    jusbeach Ramble on Rose

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    Have this 8” piece I got from Pman. It weighs 20# but isn’t a big rail. It does looks similar to what’s in your photo. The stuff I’ve hauled on my semi to Cascade Locks was much larger/heavier then the chunk I have. 51AA553F-6E9B-4577-BE6C-CEB39C544BB5.jpeg
  20. Sedro Tom

    Sedro Tom No hurry, no worry Supporter

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    These work great for small stuff on the work table or big stuff on the floor...

    [​IMG]

    :D