Historic Logging Sites and Equipment

Discussion in 'Pacific Northwet - Where it's green. And wet.' started by DiggerD, Mar 14, 2018.

  1. DiggerD

    DiggerD DougFir from SuperDuke Days

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,883
    Location:
    Mid Wet Or A Gun
    Saw some neat O information on the train wheels and what holds them on the track.

    Its not the big flange,,,it's the taper on the wheels.

    I will try to find it.,,,you tube info last month.
    rg sw wa. likes this.
  2. DiggerD

    DiggerD DougFir from SuperDuke Days

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,883
    Location:
    Mid Wet Or A Gun
    This is not the clip I saw, but it shows' the design.

    Will keep looking.

    rg sw wa. likes this.
  3. dammitdave

    dammitdave Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,690
    Location:
    Port Townsend, WA
    I have a piece of 18lb rail that was salvaged from the logging railroad in Mill City, OR in the 50's. It regularly upsets the neighbors. We used a couple of sticks about 20ft(?) long(uncut w'holes) for stiff arms on a dock at Westwood Village in Tidewater, OR. Looked like the piece on the left in Sedro Tom's photo. dd

    P.S. I saw mine rail in the Kennicut copper mine in Utah that looked to be a foot high and nearly that across. They had a "track handler" for that rail!
    rg sw wa. and Getnout like this.
  4. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,674
    Location:
    Skagit Valley, Washington
    Logging began on Blanchard mountain by horses and a tramway in the 1880’s. Eventually 4 rail inclines and one truck incline were built to access the big timber on the steep slopes. A large mill on the salt chuck at Blanchard provided steady jobs for decades. By 1928 the old growth harvest was over, the mill closed. Cedar salvage operations continued for many years. The State regained title to much of the mountain as the cut over land was abandoned in lieu of paying property taxes. This last mill can be found today on the southeast aspect. It appears complete, right down to the truck and forklift. Like an insect caught in amber, this is a picture of a time gone by.

    07E7EDD1-E17C-418B-AC32-B0103A1BB839.jpeg


    7C8ADBA4-7283-4D8A-A738-92D6BE4457D8.jpeg


    ED430157-72A3-450A-AC36-AAF609E8D030.jpeg


    32B1C066-2AE6-4F28-9310-04C6289E2330.jpeg


    48ABF3D9-A870-46B1-8407-368D91673F8F.jpeg
  5. joeaverage

    joeaverage mediocre

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    545
    Location:
    Seattle
    Not sure if this qualifies as historic but I was on the south side of Riffe Lake and I saw this poking through the trees
    Riffe spigot.jpg
    [​IMG]

    It was connected to this
    Riffe tank.jpg
    [​IMG]

    The older log trucks with drum brakes use water to cool them on the long downhill grades. They fill their water tanks before heading up the hill to pick up a load.



    [​IMG]
    Getnout likes this.
  6. Shady Pass David

    Shady Pass David Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,341
    Location:
    Brief Wa.
    Hey Joe..whatcha gonna do with that gun?...
    Well anyways, the images don't show up for me, I tried 2 ways...
    outbacktm and DiggerD like this.
  7. joeaverage

    joeaverage mediocre

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    545
    Location:
    Seattle
    Ha, thanks for the heads up. I think that's the first time that has happened to me on this site. Hopefully it's fixed.
    Oldschoolrocker likes this.
  8. dammitdave

    dammitdave Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,690
    Location:
    Port Townsend, WA
    "The older log trucks with drum brakes use water to cool them on the long downhill grades. They fill their water tanks before heading up the hill to pick up a load."
    Yep, nothing like dropping into the first turn coming down a grade and finding the line lubricated with water and mud from a truck trying to keep their speed down.:yikes
  9. Brokein2

    Brokein2 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,125
    The hill across Riffe lake is where Peterbilt trucks were developed and one of their best features was brakes that did not fade or need water...

    http://www.chronline.com/news/peter...cle_d7a236c8-6574-5adb-a369-ba6b6fc32f6a.html
  10. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,674
    Location:
    Skagit Valley, Washington
    Fascinating! Old timers who worked in the NW woods well remember the steep hills around Morton. Local topography helped drive the development of mechanical systems used for harvest and transport, like the railroad incline. The Sessoms Lowering System was built by Paccar in Renton and Washington Iron Works in Seattle built the big snubbing engines. In the early 1970’s I was able to tour Washington Iron Works as part of a college tech class and watch the construction of the big Skagit towers. Paul Bunyon sized machinery.

    Way back in 1970 I located a very old truck in the bushes outside of Monroe, Washington. Careful examination revealed it to be a 1923 Kenworth, the first year of manufacture under that brand name. It was fitted with a Buda gas engine. I attempted the purchase thereof, but it was not for sale. It soon disappeared. Later I heard the rumor that it had been purchased by Paccar, the current present parent company of Kenworth, Peterbuilt, and DAF. Does anyone have any information about this historic truck?
    rg sw wa. and Getnout like this.
  11. joeaverage

    joeaverage mediocre

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    545
    Location:
    Seattle
    Yep, Peterman Hill. I know I've seen a photo taken from up there on the NW pics thread overlooking the town of Morton (maybe yours?). I haven't been up there for a few years but there are some great spots where you can see Rainier, Adams and St. Helens all in one spot.
    Getnout, rg sw wa. and Brokein2 like this.
  12. Brokein2

    Brokein2 Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,125
    Cottler's Rock...One that lives on is the story of T.A. “Al” Peterman who came to harvest logs from Cottler’s Rock during the Great Depression. The innovative man began buying surplus trucks and modifying them so they would hold better on steep hillsides. After a few years he bought a factory in California to produce quality trucks known today as Peterbuilt Trucks. Today as you approach Morton from the west on US Hwy 12, a section of the road is referred to by the locals as Peterman Hill.

    ol.jpg
  13. Shady Pass David

    Shady Pass David Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,341
    Location:
    Brief Wa.
    rg sw wa. and Anatoli like this.
  14. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,674
    Location:
    Skagit Valley, Washington
    Right on! My Uncle Ernie drove a Peterbuilt log truck for decades in Skagit County. Sitting behind the wheel at 6 years old was instrumental in my own 44 year commercial driving career that included more than 30 years driving Kenworth trucks, the sister brand. That old Pete featured 2 four speed gearboxes back to back, and the shift pattern was not the same on both. It was pretty easy to forget the operating sequence and miss a downshift on a steep hill. We didn’t wear seatbelts back then so we could jump for our lives if necessary. Some guys didn't make it.
  15. Shady Pass David

    Shady Pass David Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,341
    Location:
    Brief Wa.
    On one job I had they gave me the rottenest truck..Gas powered IH...They put the 2nd box shifter in backwards and didn't tell me...I was the new guy..
    The 1st hill I hit..You can picture the traffic behind me and the honking..
    They didn't get the last laugh...I did......:2guns.....
  16. slugsmasher

    slugsmasher Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 20, 2011
    Oddometer:
    612
    Location:
    PNWet
    Gotta wonder when the last time the Bormuth mill has been used. I got some shots below from 2004 and it was in full operation. This was before the big awning in your photos shows. Appears today that it hasn't turned a blade in a while.

    104_0483.JPG

    104_0498.JPG

    104_0490.JPG

    104_0487.JPG

    104_0499.JPG
    bomose, rg sw wa., Anatoli and 2 others like this.
  17. DiggerD

    DiggerD DougFir from SuperDuke Days

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2013
    Oddometer:
    5,883
    Location:
    Mid Wet Or A Gun
    Thanks ...I can almost smell the pitch.
    Watercat, outbacktm and rg sw wa. like this.
  18. dammitdave

    dammitdave Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,690
    Location:
    Port Townsend, WA
    Alright, somebody pushed my button, piqued my interest and set off a light bulb moment for me. How did old time loggers supply water for steam powered equipment? Locomotives have a tender or saddle tanks, we've all seen those photos mostly the work of Darius Kinsey. Digger started a thread for historic water tanks but I thought these photos might be more appropriate here. I found these photos on the Washington Rural Heritage site/North Olympic Collection. WARNING Tremendous Time Sink!

    Here's a fine rail mounted tank. You could load water anywhere along the rail line.
    [​IMG]

    This skidder has a simple post-and-plank box tank behind it. Note the width of the planks.
    [​IMG]

    This pair of skidders are being used as yarder and loader. I don't see a main water supply but they are scavenging water from the steam traps on both machines.
    [​IMG]
  19. dammitdave

    dammitdave Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,690
    Location:
    Port Townsend, WA
    Here's the photo with the horizontal tanks on the back of the skids.
    Yarders with Horiz Drum Tanks_LI.jpg
  20. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2016
    Oddometer:
    2,674
    Location:
    Skagit Valley, Washington
    I have though a lot about the water supply problem too, especially in regards to snubbing engines fixed in place on top of railroad inclines and logging camps in general. On Blanchard mountain I have located 3/4” iron pipe around the snubbing engine site. It also may have gravity fed oil for the boiler from the big tank car shoved up a steep spur above the snubber. While visible in the top right corner of the photo, careful examination of the site reveals that this negative has been reversed. The tank car was positioned to the right ( north) of the snubber.


    image.jpg

    These bottom 2 images are reversed negatives. Note the snubbing engine stack at the far right. The trestle to the left of the tank car is easily located today alongside the Alternate Incline Trail. So are many parts of the Loki pictured.

    image.jpg

    On can still walk the length of this incline fairly easily today. The present day truck road crosses the slope about where the men are standing in the photo. The old growth stumps are still there. A 300’ x 90’ trestle crossed the creek just behind the photographer’s location. A few massive horizontal support logs and associated metal can be easily found. Fire swept the mountain several times, but the 1925 blaze threatened Lizard Lake Camp. Women and children were lowered down the incline to safety. Some men were badly burned, and many trestles were destroyed.


    image.jpg


    Photos and text from Logging Railroads of Skagit County by Dennis Thompson.