Honda AT low seat

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by canyncarvr, May 26, 2020.

  1. canyncarvr

    canyncarvr Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Oddometer:
    142
    I read a lot of 'It's great' and 'It stinks' about this seat. Only one way to find out the facts; I bought one.

    Short version: A huge improvement over the OEM stock seat.

    Particulars that imply themselves into the matter:

    I'm 5'8" (says my DL. Probably closer to 5'7" these days)
    30" inseam
    I have an AirHawk on the seat.
    Seat is in the 'low' position.
    It is still a PITA to get latched no matter how many 'how-to's I watch.
    I broke my tailbone four years back. It's a problem.

    I used to think that soft was good in a bike seat. My dirtbike had a soft seat. I used to laugh at KTMs and their ridiculously hard seats. Wanting to try a gripper seat cover, I got a Ceet high foam and said cover. It was carved on some to fit my shortness, but was hard as a 2x4. Lo and behold...it worked great! No more monkey butt after a 65 mile day.

    That changed my mind about soft and it being a good thing.

    Some have said the AT low seat is too hard. Not enough cush. Wrong pad angles....all sorts of gripes.

    I found none of that to be part of my experience.

    I've taken as long as a 200 mile ride which included asphalt, USFS roads, and dirt with the result of NO butt pain whatsoever. I have NEVER experienced that before. It usually takes only 30 miles or so before I start switching cheeks, or dreading having to move at all. A 500 mile day is simply bad.

    After 200 miles on the low seat, my backside felt the same as when I started.

    Yes, I am a good bit closer to the ground, too. I can almost flat foot a stop....but that is with a thick soled bike boot (reax). Reach was not the reason I got the low seat, though.

    An added benefit I haven't totally sorted is the wind effect with the lower seat position. Several days of hundreds of miles a day on the highway on the AT will give me aching shoulders and neck. I did not get the sense that was starting to happen at only 200 miles...and it usually would have started by then with the OEM seat.

    At $150 or so, it is a chance well worth taking if you have any tendency toward wanting a bit lower seating position whether that interest is for foot reach or wind effect.

    Somewhat of an aside: I tried a fork tunnel shield. It made wind buffeting worse. I do ride with a tank bag all the time.

    I was concerned that a sharper knee angle would make the change from seated to standing problematic. It didn't.

    It's an all thumbs up for the AT low rally seat from me.

    ...not that what I think matters. I know better'n that. I'm just sayin' is all.
    #1
  2. rob_w

    rob_w n00b

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    5
    I just put the low seat on my new ATAS, and it made everything perfect for me. I'm out of the wind, I can flatfoot, and I can now push the bike backward into my parking space, while seated on it. and I also find it more comfortable then the original.
    #2
  3. bbenthin

    bbenthin n00b

    Joined:
    May 26, 2014
    Oddometer:
    9
    Thanks for the thoughtful write-up, appreciate the perspective. I'm in a similar position (vertically speaking). I don't own an AT yet, but will as soon as possible. I've ridden my buddy's 2017 AT briefly, and while comfortable with the stock seat in the low position for me with a similar height/inseam, I've always wondered whether a little extra reach to terra-firma when offroad would be worth any trade-off in longer distance touring comfort. Sounds like it's worth a try!
    #3
  4. mk4dubbin

    mk4dubbin Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2011
    Oddometer:
    20
    Ahhh, I need to get one.
    #4
  5. nohumdrumlife

    nohumdrumlife Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2010
    Oddometer:
    91
    Location:
    Parker, CO
    I'm a long distance tourer and 4700 miles in 11 days was no big thing with the low seat. With less padding it has some Corbin like "less is more" qualities.
    #5