Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by JimmieA, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. McRat

    McRat Long timer

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    Jenny,

    Most of the Suzy shocks are new or close to new. Most are sold by MC wreckers. I have a 600, 750, and 1000 shock, and all are fully charged, leak free, and appear to be brand new. Suzuki upgraded these in 2011.

    You really have to try to the Suzy shock to appreciate it. I think you'll be impressed if you approach it with an open mind.

    Racers complain the Suzy factory shock is too soft for closed course competition. Reviewers say it has one of the smoothest street suspensions of any sportbike. On the Honda, it works well on whoops and pavement, far better than the OEM unit which fades rapidly on whoops and is a bit harse on uneven pavement. And the spring rate is spot on.

    Parts is parts. They work, or they don't, then you try something else. For those who don't want to experiment, the RR kit is a great value when you add your time into the equation. However, the RR kit was not released when I started, and now I'm really happy with the rear damper. The front needs some more work, but it's far better than it was.
  2. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    It certainly sounds like a good option!

    Out of interest, I presume your bike is the non-ABS version? - that is without the pump and box hanging down in front of the shock.

    Personally I really like the integrated design of the GSXR shock - with the reservoir built into the top of the shock body - but presumably that isn't going to fit on the ABS equipped bikes, and you'd have to use some sort of alternative version with a remote reservoir like we did?

    Out of interest, I saw on the CBR500R forum that some of the guys who race them use a replacement rear shock with a separate reservoir too.

    Jx
  3. kawagumby

    kawagumby Long timer Supporter

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    I've been modifying dirt bikes for a long while, so when I looked to ebay to find low-time street parts soooo cheap in comparison, I was truly amazed! I guess it's all about demand.

    It's good that RR is breaking down components to sell, that should attract more buyers, IMO.
  4. AleksTheGreat

    AleksTheGreat Been here awhile

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    I believe a shock from a Honda CBR600 F4i bolts up and has a remote reservoir.
  5. McRat

    McRat Long timer

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    As far as I know the Suzy shock will require cutting plastic to fit on ABS bikes. Mine is non-ABS. Lots of debate on how well ABS works in the desert especially on rocky/sandy downhills, and the last thing I wanted was to forget to pull a fuse and crash a heavy bike on a steep hill.

    The CBR600 F4 shock has a remote reservoir and is a much stiffer shock. It might be a better choice for roadracing. It apparently bolts up to the ABS bikes, but also lowers the rear. I do know it's a lot heavier than the Suzy unit. I never road tested the F4, I thought the Suzy unit was a better fit for me, as it would allow me more travel and less weight.
  6. kawagumby

    kawagumby Long timer Supporter

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    I have both the 2011 GSXR 750 shock (10.5 rate) and 2000 CBR600 F4 shock (14.2 rate and same length as X with remote reservoir) (the stock CB500X shock has a 10.7 rate). So the GSXR 750 is a complete bolt-up if the stock X rate is right for one's weight. The 2011-13 GSXR 600 has an even lighter rate (10.1) and the 1000 is heavier. So if one knows what rate is best for them, they can shop the particular model or year and get pretty close. I just use race tech's spring rate info to get the spec's.
    As far as price goes, I got the 2011 GSXR 750 shock with only 400 miles on it from a large re-cycle company ....shipped for $27. That's not much of a gamble for experimenting and improving the bike.
  7. Crocodile Tears

    Crocodile Tears Legion of Snark Supporter

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    If I remember correctly, springrates are 10.2 kg/mm in the 600, 10.5 kg/mm in the 750, and ~10.8ish is what the RR standard stage one works out to (if I didn't screw the math too bad - 110 Nm). I've heard the stock CB500X quoted as 10.7 kg/mm

    The F4 unit is a more direct fit, and doesnt raise the rear end, and has remote resevoir, but its rate is something absurd like 14.4 kg/mm. It might be the ticket for a racer, as you have to respring anyways, so you might as well rebuild and revalve while you're in there, and the geometry doesn't change.

    ABS models I've heard cannot fit the GSXR shock, though other sources say it can squeeze in with trimming. My non-ABS I trimmed regardless, as I was getting quite frustrated trying to snake the thing in there.
  8. kawagumby

    kawagumby Long timer Supporter

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    How do you like the handling/turning characteristics with the GSXR shock? Are you using the stock fork height in the triples?
    The reason I ask is that I think the rear end getting upped may be a good thing. I noticed the bike handles the turns better with the forks raised some in the triples, and I wouldn't need to do that if the rear is extended some with the GSXR shock.
  9. Crocodile Tears

    Crocodile Tears Legion of Snark Supporter

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    I felt like mine was a bit more twitchy on the highway and really dove into turns well - luckily I had it installed in time for a trip through the Blue Ridge, Dragon, Cherohala Skyway, etc earlier this summer. It feels very stable leaned over and you can tell the rear is doing most of that - hard for me to describe well outside of an overall improvement. Freeway I think some of the twitch may be due to my cases / screen / handguards. Something doesnt feel quite right about the bikes aero sometimes.
  10. McRat

    McRat Long timer

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    I need a cheaper source for Euro OEM Honda parts. Any suggestions?
  11. McRat

    McRat Long timer

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    First, since I'm running TKC80's the turn-in was more abrupt than the stock tires, but not a big deal, you adapt pretty quick. Then I did the 600 with stock plates and rubbed the coolant tank, then ended up with the 750 with custom side plates for long travel and to clear the tank. You can rotate the factory plates and grind the shock mount welding tab (not structural), but I chose not to do that. IIRC, the travel was too much and the tire could rub the top the wheelwell, and it would certainly hit a factory pipe (I have a yosh pipe, which has extra clearance).

    In the end, since I increased the travel almost 3", my ride height in the rear is the about the same, since I set it up for 1/3 laden sack, or just over 2.5".

    I also upped the front spring rate and adjusted the sack. I would like to push the forks down, but I could not find extension adapters. Too lazy to make some.

    In the end, the bike is very well mannered both at 75mph, and tight twisty mountain roads.

    The TKC80's grip surprisingly well, you can scrap the stock pegs pretty easy, so I changed pegs to ones with more ground clearance, yet the same foot height.
  12. kawagumby

    kawagumby Long timer Supporter

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    Thanks to both of you....good info.
  13. sawride

    sawride Been here awhile

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    Well, after reading most if not all 433 pages of this thread I could not contain myself and traded in my 2014 CB500F for a 2015 CB500XA today. I bought the "F" in February thinking I needed something more sporty to go with my WeeStrom (2014). It did give me a chance to get familiar with the 500 line but as soon as I took off from the dealer on the "X" today I went "ah ha, this is much better". The ride home even turned into a minor adventure when about 10 miles from home the clouds let loose with a torrential downpour and some of the streets were more like shallow lakes.

    One question, I would like to put a rack and top box on but the taillight on all 3 versions of the 500 seem to be tucked up close to the seat. A top box will extend quite a bit past the taillight. Am I just being paranoid thinking the taillight might be somewhat obscured?
  14. cls

    cls Long timer Supporter

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    It's always good to have options and I see the advantage of both/either way. For me, I don't like to tinker, wrench, or experiment. I'll bolt some stuff on, plug something in, replace or remove a thing or two, but I want it to be tested, right, and convenient. The RRP is not cheap, but they got my money. Do what works for you. Heck, I'd be interested to hear different results from different efforts and set-ups to see how they compare w/each other and the RRP. I will gladly spend more money to have no questions, performance, ease, and more time to ride. To each his/her own.
  15. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    Congrats on the new ride, saw. I'm a lurker here with an interest in the X. Very interested in hearing your thoughts about it, particularly why you like it better than the F and also, how it compares to your V-Strom.

    Thanks.
  16. McRat

    McRat Long timer

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    Can't argue with that. Cheap is a relative term. I think the RR kit is a bargain when you look at low production run performance goodies.

    One aftermarket baby piston for our bikes is $160 due to the low volume. To put that in perspective, you can get an entire set of eight large pistons for a V8 for $130.
  17. GsVs

    GsVs Goin' Somewhere

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    I have the SW-Motech Rear Rack set-up .. and you are right it does over hang the tail/stop light about 8 to 9 inches. It is a few inches higher then the taillight ....

    I would say it would have to be a pretty tall truck and then would have to tailgating you to not see the tail light.

    But it could happen ,,, I plan on adding aux LED tail/stop lights (something like Hyper-Lite's) down lower near the license plate over the winter ... just cause - well you know
  18. Jud

    Jud Long timer

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    It actually increases the travel or is it just longer? I wouldn't figure a Gixxer would have much more than 5-5.5 inches of travel. I know the linkage and swing arm length add travel but still, I wouldn't figure the Suzy shock would have more stroke than the CB? If so, how much more stroke and how much longer is it? Would make a good alternative to look into if I get a CB500X and add my XRL forks.
  19. todd900ss

    todd900ss Been here awhile

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    This is starting to sound like a better option. Tell us more about the side plates you made.
  20. McRat

    McRat Long timer

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    The bumpstop on the GSXR shock is soft urethane, like they use in automotive suspensions with torsion bars to make the spring rate progressive. It amounts to a polymer spring. When you include the bumpstop deflection, the GSXR shock will increase the rear wheel travel on the CB500. By rotating the side plates, this travel jumps a bunch, but requires grinding.

    I basically took a rotated plate as a pattern and moved the shock eye hole forward about 0.200", IIRC. This also reduced the wheel travel a little. The OEM rotated plate (requires grinding) will most likely rub the TKC80 tire if you bottom hard. And it hits the stock exhaust system.

    This weekend I will try and find the blueprint for it. Pretty sure I saved it. If not, I'll make a new one using the plates. I didn't paint them because they were prototypes, so I need to take them off to paint them anyhow.