Honda CB500X

Discussion in 'Land of the Rising Sun: ADV Bikes from Japan' started by JimmieA, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. SR56

    SR56 Long timer

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    JH....check out the little slip on I bought and installed from Amazom for $59.99. It works great and is light enough that I don't need an additional brace. Loud enough to hear the bike now but not too loud by any means.
    "Radiant Cycles Shorty GP Exhaust Motorcycle Slipon Short Muffler Pipe for 2013-2019 Honda CB500F CB500 F X BLACK"

    I did run a piece of safety wire from the slip on to the brace that is forward of it just in case it started to move...no movement yet.


    31R8dkzV1RL._AC_SR160,160_.jpg

    ShenandoahRider likes this.
  2. Vizz

    Vizz n00b

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    Hi All
    My partner's 2016 CB500X forks are too stiff for her. We got the bike second hand and it looks like it has had suspension work done. Today I pulled the forks apart hoping to be able to see what work may have been done, so I can make a plan to give her plush suspension.

    Are the damping pistons below the spring a standard Honda part or an aftermarket part?

    Also, does anyone know how I might tell if the spring has been changed to suit a heavier rider?

    20190824_173426.jpg
  3. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Vizz - apparently you bought your bike from an idiot.

    Those are the Rally-Raid shim valves (and sticker on the forks), but whoever fitted them appears to have left out all the other components that actually make them work... instead just dropped the shims in and put all the OEM stuff back in - so no wonder it doesn't work properly since not only have you now got a lot more preload on the spring (the thickness of the shim assembly), but it will now restrict the flow without the proper Rally-Raid damper rods in there, which have the correct size [larger] holes to work with the shim valves.

    That is the reason your bike feels 'stiff' at the front. If you simply remove the shim valves from what you've got there, you'll essentially have the standard suspension again - which is not great, but ought to feel better than what you've got currently.

    I would get in touch with the person you bought the bike from and ask them where the rest of the Rally-Raid fork kit is... the product description is on their website: along with the shims valve assembly you should have got replacement springs - which are both linear-wound (not progressive) longer and eliminate the OEM plastic spacer - dedicated damper-rods with the correct [larger] holes for more oil flow into the shim-stack, the shims themselves, a spacer tube/spring seat that goes on top of the shims, and a couple of plastic seats for the springs too.

    Fit it all together correctly and you should have significantly better suspension than standard, and certainly not what you're experiencing at the moment.

    Sorry you're having trouble, but this illustrates why some people need to RTFM and/or shouldn't be let loose with tools - I do wonder what on earth whoever cobbled this together was thinking...

    Jenny x
  4. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    Ooops, that's a bad mule you've got there.
    Essentially those internals are mixed from different stuff.
    As far as I can see the damper rod (the rod with holes on it), spacer and the dual rate spring is from the stock suspension. The circled part is part of the Rally Raid for kit - essentially a cartridge emulator.
    Unfortunately this won't work like this, and I can understand that it was harsh for her. The emulators need the RR damper rod, spacer and spring to work.
    Quick cure is to remove the emulator valve (the circled part) and assemble everything.
    Depending in her weight, I'd use a little less suspension fluid to reduce the air spring effect in the forks, and in case she's really light potentially cut about 10mm from the plastic spacer to reduce preload.
    edstoll, Rob-Houston and Vizz like this.
  5. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    Lol, Jenny was faster, and apparently less PC than me. ;-)
    Definitely try to get the rest of the fork parts from the PO, and you'll get surprised.
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  6. Vizz

    Vizz n00b

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    Thanks for the help Jenny and Oyabun. Did as you both suggested and removed the cartridge emulator doo-dad. Woah what a difference! My partner can cruise in relative comfort now, thanks again.

    The previous owner didn't have the bike long, it sounds like the owner before him was the culprit.
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  7. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi Vizz - glad you were able to sort it...

    (for anyone else following along you've removed what was essentially a restriction from the OEM set-up, which was not designed to have shim valves effectively slowing down the oil flow)

    It's such a shame that whoever fitted the shims originally didn't do the proper/complete kit - although if they had, perhaps the second owner might not have sold you the bike!

    Have fun out there!

    Jenny x
  8. Oyabun

    Oyabun 親分

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    No wonder it was uncomfortable.
    I had a lingering thought I could not dismiss, so I made a dry test on the bench with an oem damper rod, Tractive emulator valve and stock spring to see if I'm right.
    I was. Both the damper rod and the spring have a smaller inside diameter than the spring loaded rebound bleed and the compression shims respectively. This essentially means that the rebound valve was not opening at all, and the compression circuit was seriously compromised. In short the fork becomes hydrolocked, and stiff like a broomstick.

    Attached Files:

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  9. MFS

    MFS Been here awhile

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    Brutal, but believable lol. Guaranteed previous owner didn't like the ride, blamed the bike?
    I picked up a used truck last year. After we signed papers guy says "I should let you know, tires are in good shape (as I seen) but you'll need to swap them out for winter. Zero traction."
    I checked the air pressure when I drove it home...he had 80 POUNDS of air in each tire. 1 mans trash, is another mans treasure!
    Knowing my personal limits...I paid someone to install my suspension kit lol.
    Enjoy the bike!

    MFS
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  10. redolga

    redolga Adventurer

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    Posted on the 2019 CB thread, spoke wheel options other than RR. Both 17"/17" and 19"/17" sizes and a tubeless option for an additional $100.

    www.oxgmotor.com

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  11. SR56

    SR56 Long timer

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    JMo (& piglet)...or anyone else that can answer the question below about a 21" wheel on the front of a '19 model 500X.

    Sooo we covered the 21" wheel NOT fitting on the '18 and earlier models BUT...has anyone investigated a 21" wheel on the '19 model?

    If a 19" will fit where a 17" used to be then a 21" should fit where a 19" used to be...well at least in theory.

    A 500X with a 21" front wheel should be relatively off road capable and be lighter and a good bit less expensive than the 790 KTM/700 Tenere. Being a weight weenie, I'd rather have a bike that weighs less than heavier with a little extra power :-).

    Figured I'd pose the question on the public forum for all to see...just in case somebody else has the same question but is hesitant to ask.
  12. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Really SR' - this conversation has been done to death... the reason the 2019 model has a 19" front wheel on it is because a 21" wheel won't fit.

    The chassis geometry of the bike is still exactly the same, and you cannot physically fit a 21" front end on this bike without jacking it sky high (the Thai Rally bike had a 37" seat height), and the back end of this bike does not allow anything like the same amount of travel required to match the front, so it looks like and rides like a chopper.

    Honestly, everyone getting hung-up about 21" front wheels does not understand 'adventure' motorcycles... dirt bikes use skinny 21" front wheels for extreme off-road conditions. Adventure bikes are not designed to be ridden in extreme conditions, or at least not at the same pace as you'd ride a dirt-bike in that terrain - they are designed to be ALL- terrain bikes, and handle a mix of terrain including a high proportion of paved roads equally well.

    As I've said time and again, there is nowhere I couldn't take this bike with a 19" front wheel, that I could if it had a 21" front wheel - the limitation is not the wheel size, it is the overall weight and modest suspension travel compared to a dedicated dual-sport/enduro.

    Like I said way back at the beginning of the vendor thread to someone, when you have actually reached the limit of what this bike (and I mean the Rally-Raid bike with upgraded suspension of course) come and talk to me, because I've ridden these bike over 60,000 miles over every kind of terrain imaginable, including the Rubicon, and I've never needed a 21" front wheel.

    Enjoy this bike for what it is... and if you genuinely need more off-road performance, get something taller, smaller and lighter - a KTM 690 would do the trick ;o)

    Jenny x
  13. SR56

    SR56 Long timer

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    Thanks...I didn't understand the 21" wouldn't fit the '19 as well as the earlier models. 690 KTM...great bike but not for me. I really enjoy the frame mounted fairing on the 500X just trying to figure out a way to NOT buy a 700 Tenere :lol3.
  14. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Yes, if you read around what was required to make the 19" front wheel fit on that chassis, you'll realise there is certainly no room for anything bigger - Honda basically did what John [at Rally-Raid] and I did back in 2014 to their 2019 model - although their approach was to increase the offset of the triple-clamps (lengthening the wheelbase by an inch) in an effort not to raise the seat height too much.

    Unless you were to raise the whole front of the bike significantly - which would inevitably increase the seat height on that geometry frame, there isn't any way to put a 21" front wheel on that frame (certainly not without seriously restricting the amount of travel you would have), which would complete defeat the purpose. Similarly, as I explained above, the swing-arm pivot position and length does not allow for anything like the required travel at the rear to match the increase in height at the front - it is the limitation of that frame design.

    If you look at a dirt-bike chassis (designed to have a 21" front wheel) compared to an adventure bike chassis, you'll see the headstock on a dirt-bike is not only higher, but typically they also use a leading axle fork to give more room while not having a huge fork-offset. As I trust you probably appreciate now, these things do not work in a linear numerical fashion.

    Ultimately though, the CB500X - with the Rally-Raid kit fitted at least - is a very capable ALL-terrain bike - more than capable both on and off-road than most people are ever likely to need if their honest. As I concluded after my cross-country Trans-Am 500 ride back in 2015, it exceeded my expectations/requirements with still some margin to spare, and was a very easy bike to live with day-today. So if you genuinely need more that what the set-up offers, then you need to look at a different platform.

    In that regard, the Tenere 700 also looks like a great bike* - a little more of everything than the CB - more travel, more power, but equally a little more size and weight too. Whether you need that is a moot point (I suspect not ;o) - however, as I always say - I've only every bought a bike because I like the look of it - so buy whatever personally floats your boat... and at the end of the day, they are only bikes, tools, toys - no one says you have to marry it forever!

    Have fun out there... whatever you choose to ride.

    Jenny x

    *note. I had one of the first XT660Z's back in 2008 - and rode that all over the USA, then with a lot of mods raced it to Dakar in 2009. I still think it's one of the best off-the-shelf all-terrain travel bikes you can/could buy - and was one of the benchmarks we used when developing the Rally-Raid kit for the CB500X.
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  15. SR56

    SR56 Long timer

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    Jenny...thanks for everything and yep I tried to find a good 660 before I went after the 500X but there aren't many of them around in the US...and even fewer in good condition :lol3. Did you ever try the TKC80s on the 17" rims front and rear before changing to the 19" front? Or has anyone else tried just putting TKC80s on their '16-'18 bike...if yes what is your opinion on how much just the tire change helps off road?

    I may try the TKCs on the 17" rims just for giggles...I have plenty serious off road equipment in the garage already. I have a feeling I'll end up about half way between where I am now (all street) and a fairly capable Adventure machine :-).
  16. JMo (& piglet)

    JMo (& piglet) Unicorn breeder

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    Hi SR56' - yes I've ridden a CB500X with a 17" front wheel and a dedicated front TKC (the Continental TKC80 being one of the few all-terrain pattern tyres that come in a dedicated 17" front carcass/profile/size), and as you might imagine the tread does make an appreciable difference to grip on loose surfaces.

    UKJeeper on here rode his bike with 17/17" wheels all the way across the US (including the TAT) on TKC80 tyres, so the bike set up like that is more than capable of handling the kind of terrain you'd encounter with the stock suspension travel - just bear in mind you don't have the same ground clearance as you'd have with the LEVEL 2 suspension and 19" front wheel.

    Jx
  17. Cruz

    Cruz Lost but laughing.

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    17/17 with TKC80 fitted works great off road everywhere except deep sand, and on road exceptionally well.
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  18. mcpenner

    mcpenner mcpenner

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    Sometimes small changes make a big difference. I've had these 30mm raisers all summer but just never bothered to install them. I do like the little 500 but I still thought about the V-Strom it replaced every time I took it out, wondering if I'd made the right choice. I kept telling myself that next season when the street tires are worn out and I install tkc's I'll stop wondering. I finally put the raiser on and near the end of the first ride it occurred to me that I hadn't thought of the V-strom once (till then). Everything just felt right.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
  19. Wind_Rider

    Wind_Rider Been here awhile

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    I rode my CB500X for one season on the stock 17 front rim with a TKC80 and survived. You have to be vigilant about the front end washing out, it can happen quickly.

    The 19 front rim is more relaxed and forgiving in the sand.
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  20. MFS

    MFS Been here awhile

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    20190824_131140.jpg
    I was in the same boat as you, tried the tkc80 up front but I really couldn't get over the size of the front tire as a whole.
    This is my second summer and about 20,000 kms now on a 130/80 Kenda Big Block.
    It adds height (I did raise the front fender an inch with no problems).
    I commute daily, play as much as possible and the local park here is called "Sandilands" so....Lotsa sand. And backroads gravel kinda thing.
    I love this tire choice, it's my 5th different front and favorite of the bunch. For the kms I have on the bike I can't justify spending more on the bigger rims, and at the time I upgraded the suspension I couldn't get the whole package at the time. (Loving the Rally Raid suspension!)
    For me the bike sits more level, and is incredibly stable off and on road. Made such a big difference, and jeez that tire not only grips good but just. does not. wear at all.
    Tried, tested, and approved (by maybe just me lol) but it seriously works.
    Just an option! Good luck.

    MFS