Honda CT125/ Trail 125/ Hunter Cub

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by cabanza, Sep 26, 2019.

  1. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    I found his picture online

    DFF42135-69B9-4FCD-8AB3-D181AD1488C3.gif
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  2. YamaGeek

    YamaGeek Skeletor sparklemuffin.

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    Imma gonna stick my neck out a bit here..

    Amazon has this bike listed for about a grand.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...42e-e8f213ef368b&pf_rd_r=97Q133QR59VNVS0JBNF4

    Coolster140.jpg

    It's a Coolster 140 'adult sized' pitbike. Before you dismiss this out of hand look at what this bike is spec'd out with for parts.

    For those of you looking at a much more off road capable bike for trail riding, ( not so much on road..) and you're not afraid to do some changes like bigger fuel tank, hoops, tires and modding the suspension. These little Coolsters are a pretty decent starting point for someone on a budget will the skillset to modify. I know of a couple of adult guys that ride their modded pitbikes at our local ORV area. One of them was able to license his bike for street use. I could see this bike fitted with a "19 front rim and swap the front "17 hoop to the rear. Or buy entirely new alloy rims.

    It's also could be parted out to refit an older Honda CT or other similar tiddler with better bits. For the cost new, compare what it comes with.

    Maybe this would be better in Some Assembly Required subforum, but we do have a subculture here in Battle Scooters of Wee Beasties and Honda clone engine kitbashers.
  3. wanna bECO

    wanna bECO Long timer

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    Ya know... I like the little headlight thingy that is on the cross cub. I dunno... maybe cuz it makes it look like a ruckus in a way. I would like to see the US bike have that CT125 with that headlight.

    That amazon bike is a crazy deal. I'm gonna see if it comes up on a lightning deal. :rofl
  4. bikeridermark

    bikeridermark Long timer Supporter

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    A friend has a Harley with enclosed drive chain. Maybe a one or two year deal?
    Anyway, I think he's pushing 150k on his original chain.
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  5. ErikDK

    ErikDK Been here awhile

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    Who says that the tires have to be with tubes, just because the wheels have spokes?

    Just seal them with the 3M tape and put on tubeless tires.

    Honda's PGM-FI for small bikes has an excellent track record for reliability
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  6. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    Take II

    [​IMG]
  7. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    Yes, riding a bike is dangerous. That is a big part of what attracts me too it. But there is more than one kind of danger involved. I'm sure you've heard that you should never go swimming alone, no matter how good you are. Something can always go wrong, and if it does, you have no help at all. Riding on the road is one thing. There is a lot of traffic. Sure, a lot of that traffic doesn't seem to care if they run over you, but if something goes wrong, somebody is likely to eventually stop. It is probably not a good idea to go riding in the desert 50 miles from nowhere by yourself either. I put a 4 gal. Clarke tank and a centerstand on my XT225 so I could do just that. If your bike breaks down, you crash and get hurt, or any number of other things happens, you are stuck out there, alone, with very little water, no communications, and nobody has any idea where you are. Your chances of survival are not good. Most off road riders ride in groups. But I don't know anyone else who rides, so I have no choice but to go alone or not go.
  8. villageidiot

    villageidiot Long timer Supporter

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    Sounds like you need a personal locating beacon in case shit hits the fan, a doobie and a bottle of somethin good. Take a fuckin chill and let your hair down a little bit
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  9. pnw

    pnw Long timer

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    But no similarity to the CT125 and I don't see any real value as a parts bike, at least for a Honda CT90.

    I agree with that. I have a McMurdo Fast Find PLB that I have taken with me on scooter/motorcycle, hiking, kayaking and bicycling in more remote areas. It has a 6 year battery life, no subscription. Meant only for "grave and imminent danger to life" situations like Jerry mentions and worth it for peace of mind.
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  10. YamaGeek

    YamaGeek Skeletor sparklemuffin.

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    That's the 1964 CT200, I had a '65. I will say this for it, it has an engine that will outlast the rest of the bike, I put over 50K on mine. The rear sprocket change over is a big deal breaker though. Don't lose those special bolts, and expect to readjust the chain between changes. It's easily over 20 minutes of fussing with. Yamaha copied the sprocket setup with the YG5-T Trailmaster, but you didn't need to buy the $7 set of special bolts if you lost one.

    The Honda has battery powered ignition, I replaced 3 batteries in mine. If you run it on long, fast rides often it boils out the electrolyte. But the batteries were less than $5 back in 1976.
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  11. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    Interesting thanks for sharing. I think back then the number in the model did not correlate with the engine size. So even though these were called a CT200 I don't believe the engine was 200cc. Probably 90cc or even less!

    Not sure when the transition occurred but I don't think it was 1964?
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  12. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    There are definitely reliable solutions to the problem, if you care to find them. But some folks would rather find excuses.
  13. YamaGeek

    YamaGeek Skeletor sparklemuffin.

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    I think it was a serialized thing Honda did with their earlier bikes like the CA77 Benly and my 1969 C-102, which was a 49cc, had nothng to do wth the displacement.

    The CT200 was 87cc not 89cc. I believe the transition from the pushrod to OHC CT90 was 1966 and the first year was without the hi-lo transmission.

    Oddly enough I also owned a 1969 Honda SL90, same year as the C-102 but was a change in their designation towards displacement. Yamaha used "M" "F" "Y" and "L" prefixes for their little bikes in through the 60's to 1970. The first year of the Yamaha enduro, the 1968 250 "D"T-1, etc... Oddly enough the recognition Yamaha got from their ground breaking DT-1, stuck as they built bikes into 1970. The "DT" series for all their enduros followed by the displacement in cc's.
  14. YamaGeek

    YamaGeek Skeletor sparklemuffin.

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    The point I'm making is that these are CRF50 clones and share many fitment dimensions of front fork, wheel, axle size, width and engine mount up points, similar to so many Hondas from earlier years. I didn't say it was a replacement for the CT90, it's an alternative and (or) a starting point for a modern smaller dimensioned trailbike or radical refurbishment.
  15. ErikDK

    ErikDK Been here awhile

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    A bike like an original Honda Trail, or this modern day version of it, sends a completely different signal than a dirtbike with a foot of air between the rear tire and the fender, agressive knobbed tires, and a noise enhancing muffler with 2" outlet.

    The latter sends a F-U message to others, like wearing pants with the wastline below the butt cheeks.
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  16. jank

    jank Adventurer

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    To all the folks counting on a dual range tranny- keep dreaming. I'm 100% sure this will be the same engine as the new super cub C125, and it's fine by me.

    This is not a freeway commuter, or a hardcore enduro machine. This bike will be perfect for slow scouting of new terrain, while looking arround, and soaking up the scenery.

    Here is a YT channel of a guy who uses the original CT110 in Japan in the perfect way:
    https://www.youtube.com/user/geometryer
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  17. longhaul747

    longhaul747 Long timer

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    You are likely correct. In this day and age its likely they won't be putting on a dual range tranny. However if Honda wanted to do it I think it would require minimal engineering and overall cost is likely minor. So they may still surprise us but again probably doubtful. The CT125 is totally cool even as is so if it does not include it I will still buy it but if it has it all the cooler it would be.

    I was a little surprised the new Super Cub 125 had a the semi automatic transmission that is similar to what it had on past models. This does say they are allowed to be a little different in the transmission area as long as the rest of the engine is the same. Honda may still surprise us still!

    The 1st part of the equation will be just getting a US/Europe release in my opinion. Once its officially released we can debate the dual range transmission or lack of all day long!
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  18. jank

    jank Adventurer

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    I'm so sure I'm going to buy this bike, I do not even concider that this little machine will not hit the EU market :)
    I'm also sure that when the CT will be released, the Japanese aftermarket companies like Takegawa will prepare a whole range of cool farkles- from front mounted luggage racks, through exhausts, down to a dual range transmission :)
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  19. Dan V.

    Dan V. Been here awhile

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    Just catching up with all the posts. Old farts will know who this is: :lol3 joe-btfsplk.jpg
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  20. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    The problem with that Amazon Coolster is, one, it is not street legal, and two, it has about a 34" seat height. The CT is street legal (and in my state every single dirt trail not on private land is a legal road) and it's step through design make it easier to get on. If it had a centerstand (or tubeless tires) the Suzuki VanVan would be a great small trail bike. It has a real seat like all dual sport bikes used to have. But then they started putting form over function to make them look like MX bikes.