Honda CT125 "Trail Hunter"

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by cabanza, Sep 26, 2019.

  1. Dualsport4ever

    Dualsport4ever Been here awhile

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    Im guessing a USB charging port.
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  2. ski-line900

    ski-line900 Been here awhile Supporter

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    That would be sweet
  3. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

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    I had never heard of a CT125 until earlier today when I was looking for some decals to put on my new 2019 Ice Bear CT70 clone with a 124cc engine.
    20191001_114910.jpg
    Here she is after stripping off all the stock decals and lettering.
    20191003_161002.jpg
    I was searching for some simple CT70 decals and came up with these.
    s-l1600.jpg

    Hope Honda brings in the new CT125 as that will be a good bike for here in the mountains of Western North Carolina.
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  4. B_C_Ries

    B_C_Ries Long timer

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    Full chain cases are really ugly, that is exactly what is wrong with them. People decide they don't like the way they look and then shop around for better reasons to not like them. A chain that is bathed in clean oil will last 10x longer than a chain out in the elements, but that is not as important as looking cool. It is way to difficult to adapt to the ugliness of a full chain case. The thought of looking at my DRZ 400 with a full chain case gives me nightmares.
    kpinvt likes this.
  5. YamaGeek

    YamaGeek Skeletor sparklemuffin.

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    Speak for yourself then, I happen to like the looks of chaincases, in addition to the advantages they add.
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  6. Bar None

    Bar None Long timer Supporter

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    If the chain cases makes a chain last 10x longer then I think they are beautiful. Never had a bike with one.
  7. Oilhed

    Oilhed MarkF Supporter

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    They might last longer but when it's time to clean & lube it takes forever
    Never understood why nobody encloses a belt - clean and no rocks!
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  8. B_C_Ries

    B_C_Ries Long timer

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    Excellent if you actually like the way they look you are quite fortunate, because they can do a lot to make a chain last longer. Now if you are aware of a reason people all around the world don't like them other than ugliness, please share it
  9. B_C_Ries

    B_C_Ries Long timer

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    A properly designed chain case has oil inside and it lubes itself, it is self cleaning and self lubing. Because the chain is always clean and well lubed a quality chain will seldom require adjustments. Enclosed belts will also be ugly.
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  10. ErikDK

    ErikDK Been here awhile

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    That's the same reason the British used outdoor water pipes on houses - they were much easier to thaw when the water in the pipes froze and to change or repair, if they burst before they could thaw them.

    [​IMG]
  11. JohninVT

    JohninVT Long timer

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    Having owned four TW’s, two Honda Passports and two CT90’s I can say that a CT with a dual range transmission will go places a TW can’t. A CT90 with knobbies or trials tires is unstoppable in low 1. As long as you can keep your ass on the seat they will go anywhere. You don’t have to feather the clutch(because it doesn’t have one) and it won’t overpower the rear wheel. I’ve ridden a CT90 where my TW with an ATV tire on the back absolutely couldn’t go.

    Having said all that, I don’t want a CT125 with a dual range transmission because I kind of agree with your other point. They’re going to be the same price as a new TW. They’re going to have a top speed within 5mph of a TW. Most of them are going to end up on the back of RV’s or used around town. A CT without low range will go anywhere a TW will. People who say they wouldn’t buy one unless it had a dual range transmission wouldn’t have bought one even if it had it, so who cares? Besides, in all the years and thousands of miles I’ve logged on CT’s I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve actually used low range.
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  12. Bluesmudge

    Bluesmudge Been here awhile

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    When I had a CT110 I used the low range quite a bit. Maybe you could have done it without the low range but low range made it 1000x easier. I would be 50% more likely to buy the new 125 if it comes with a dual range transmission (so 150%).

    1.) Expert level single track. I could take the CT110 on routes I had no business being on with any other bike. I'll be the first to admit I don't have the skills to ride black diamond level trails on a normal dirt bike or dual sport. With the dual range transmission I could climb stuff you would have trouble walking up. Routes that had people on proper dirt bikes flying off into the rocks and dragging their bikes around. I just scooted up the hill happily at a snails pace.

    2.) Stairs. The bike can be stored or showcased in a lot of places you wouldn't dare take a full sized bike when stairs are no longer an obstacle.

    3.) Loading into vehicles. I'm always scared loading my big bikes into my truck by myself. I have not figured out a way to do it solo that I consider safe for me and the bike. The little CT with the low range will easily climb even the steepest ramp. And with no clutch you don't need 3 hands to safely load a bike.
    pnw likes this.
  13. Jeephoto

    Jeephoto Low Post Old-Timer

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    As I've gotten older, I'm leaning toward smaller, lighter, go-anywhere bikes. Something easy to ride and allow me to explore streets, trails, anywhere.

    The Trail Cub looks ideal for that, an inner-city short commuter,exploring country roads, carry it on a hitch-hauler to explore Jeep trails in New Mexico/Utah/Colorado.

    The mini-adventure tourer for the slower, take it easy and see the sights, crowd.
  14. Oilhed

    Oilhed MarkF Supporter

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    You and me both. I got rid of my TW200 cuz getting to the fun took to long. I got rid of my GS cuz it was getting too much to handle. Now I’m thinking something small and a receiver carrier would be just the ticket. Drive to the fun, unload and ride. I WANT this bike!
  15. pnw

    pnw Long timer

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    Most of your post sounds like solid justification for the dual range trans.

    I’ve ridden a CT90 where my TW with an ATV tire on the back absolutely couldn’t go.
    A sound endorsement of the dual range trans. I've had a DR350, TW200, XT225, a few CT90s and 110s. Ridden parts of the WABDR on the XT and CTs taken the TW to Alaska. Walked along side of CT in low gear through snow drifts that I couldn't get through at all on the XT, rode up steep loose trails on the CT in low that I dropped the XT on. The low gear setting could safely and easily get me places that I couldn't get to or were riskier on the other bikes. I think the only time I dropped the CT on the WABDR was when it tipped off of the side stand in soft dirt. It is light and easy to pick up. I dropped the XT on a loose steep trail next to a steep drop off and getting the bike off my leg and upright wasn't easy.

    Having said all that, I don’t want a CT125 with a dual range transmission because I kind of agree with your other point. They’re going to be the same price as a new TW. They’re going to have a top speed within 5mph of a TW. Most of them are going to end up on the back of RV’s or used around town.
    That is a reason to not buy a CT125 that doesn't have a sub transmission rather than a reason to not want a CT with it. You already pointed out the superiority of a CT with dual transmission over a TW in difficult terrain. If all you would use it for is for around town or on the back of an RV for campground use then just buy a Super Cub 125, a CT125 without the sub transmission is just a different style for the Super Cub plaform without much, or any substantive advantage.
    A CT without low range will go anywhere a TW will.
    So, then why not just stick to your TW instead of advocating for a CT that can only match a TW off road but not match performance on road. Especially if the new prices are similar as you state that they will be.
    People who say they wouldn’t buy one unless it had a dual range transmission wouldn’t have bought one even if it had it, so who cares?
    How do you know that? I'd be very inclined to buy a new CT with the dual range transmission but most probably not if it is lacking this feature. The 1980 CT110 was the only year, '68 until the end of the model run in N. America, that was sold without the dual range trans, it is much less sought after - and for a good reason.
    Besides, in all the years and thousands of miles I’ve logged on CT’s I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve actually used low range.
    But when you did have a reason to use it you were able to get to spots that your TW with an ATV tire on the back "absolutely couldn't go", right?

    I have no doubt that Honda will not include the sub transmission because this is mostly a "parts bin" bike that they hope will sell as a styling exercise alternative to the new super cub.
    Anachronism likes this.
  16. Oilhed

    Oilhed MarkF Supporter

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    Why does anyone use yellow, green or orange letters?
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  17. cogitate

    cogitate What Marcellus Wallace Looks Like

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    They like Suzuki’s, Kawasaki’s, or KTMs?
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  18. Jeephoto

    Jeephoto Low Post Old-Timer

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    Since I am a HondaNut, I Ride Red and Write Red. LOL
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  19. RolyKBiker

    RolyKBiker Road Worrier

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    My old Honda 90 had an enclosed chain but the case had an inspection hole with its own cover. It was easy to check the tension and cleanliness through the hole and lube as necessary. Adjustment was by the normal method and, although I never had to do it, taking the chaincase off looked to be relatively simple.
    YamaGeek and Bar None like this.
  20. JohninVT

    JohninVT Long timer

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    Hey, man that’s just, like...your opinion.