Honda Deauville (NT700V) Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Towjam, Sep 4, 2009.

  1. Pbro63

    Pbro63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks upon closer inspection it needs a serious cleaning of the underside and some of the plastics will paint with spray on plasti-dip. I pulled the trigger based on the test ride and proximaty. There seem to be many clean examples of these as people have taken care of them. Hold out for such a specimen.
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  2. Pbro63

    Pbro63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Many thanks for the feedback and thoughtful post. Solved the trunk issue with longer bolts and washers that I had on hand. May be looking into the Rostra cruise control at some time. I agree with you about the light weight and character of the bike. nothing like it on the market. just a few small mods and TLC away from awesome. The latching system is working ok and I'm looking for a source of the larger pannier lids. The trunk has this interesting element I've never seen before. It slides side to side as the bike leans into turns, it helps a passenger to get with the program haha. Is your experience that this is helpful or a gimmick? Thanks, Peter

    edit. PS your bike looks awesome, what kind of chin fairing is that? Oh I see OEM, Puig has one also , any thoughts on that?
  3. bross

    bross Where we riding to? Supporter

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    It's supposed to help stabilize the bike. Top boxes can de-stabilize a bike causing tank slappers. Allowing the top box to move slightly side to side is to keep it from transmitting those forces to the bike. UK police forces quit using the ST1300s due to tank slappers, possibly because they had so much heavy equipment loaded into theirs.

    https://www.bikechatforums.com/viewtopic.php?t=88894

    My OEM Honda top box on my CBF1000 also allowed slight movement side to side. Yamaha do not sell and don't recommend using a top box on their FJR.
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  4. ptarman

    ptarman Been here awhile Supporter

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    Like Bross says, the OEM topbox slides a bit side-to-side, "presumably" to help stabilize the bike. I originally had a Shad topbox on Dudley and the bottom cracked out of it. The seller (Twisted Throttle) replaced it once. The 2nd Shad I had also had the bottom crack out while I was on my Epic Ride. A fishing boat skipper at Bay St. Lawrence on the northern tip of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, helped me rig an arrangement to hold it on the bike until I got to Twisted Throttle on my way home. TT told me that I had overloaded it (I think their suggested weight limit was something like 22 pounds). I replaced the Shad with a Givi and it was still good when I traded Dudley for Horse.

    I had used one Givi on my two '99 Kawasaki Concourses and it survived a wreck that totaled the first one of those. AFAIK, Givi manufactured the Honda topbox, so it should be good.

    I've never noticed any instability due to the topboxes. That's not to say it's not there...but it is to say that I've never noticed it. I don't ride with my hair on fire, but in small groups I frequently end up as the leader and nobody complains about our pace being too slow.

    BTW, I've got a Rostra cruise control that has never been out of the box. I had a Rostra on my first NT for about 120K miles and over the last year and a half I owned the bike, it got increasingly erratic. My electronic genius buddy who had helped me with its installation had planned to troubleshoot it but then learned that he has an aggressive form of prostate cancer. In the meantime, another friend had bought a Rostra and then learned that there was nowhere to install it on his Kawasaki Vulcan 900. He gave it to me and I had intended to use it to replace everything but the linkage on my NT. My buddy Mike had always been afraid that the linkage we dreamed up and installed would be the point of failure, but I'm pretty sure that what has failed is electronic. I had been going to start by replacing the control head, mainly because it was the simplest thing to do. But all of that became irrelevant when I bought Horse -- because this bike was already equipped with a McCruise cruise control. I wish that my McCruise used electronic actuation like the Rostra does. The Rostra maintained a very steady speed and worked at speeds up to at least 85mph. It did have an automatic disconnect if the throttle was rolled to the stop on the top end. That sometimes meant it disconnected when I was climbing steep grades in the mountains. If I downshifted to 4th or 3rd, it usually held speed even up those steepest grades.

    The McCruise is vacuum actuated and it doesn't always hold speeds up grades or into stronger headwinds. McCruise sells an electronic actuator upgrade, but I doubt I'll go to the trouble or expense to make that swap.

    If you're interested in buying my Rostra, make me an offer.

    Mike and I installed the Rostra actuator in the left side of the fairing in front of the fairing pocket. The actuator we created used fender washers and a threaded rod and has worked well.
  5. Pbro63

    Pbro63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thank you for the kind offer, so if it is a complete unused set up I'll send you a PM. I read about your install and others on the NT forum and it does seem that the trickiest parts are the mechanical connection and tapping into the bikes tachometer reading.
    I like that Rostra is more compact, will likely remove evap components to make more room. Does it come with the cc switch? I read that one needs to buy that seperately.
  6. Pbro63

    Pbro63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I've been really enjoying the bike but have noticed the the drive train noise to be excessive, at certain RPMs there is high pitch wine and in general the gearbox is not as smooth as I think it should be. On researching this I found this post as a comment on a website and found it to be very informative and will try performing this maintenance, here it is in it's unedited entirety, thank you Pedro from England. Does anyone else have any thoughts regarding this?

    Pedro September 2, 2014 at 3:09 pm

    Would like to relay this message to help owners who are concerned about clunky drivetrain on NT700V: 18 months old. 19000 miles. Full main dealer service history hid a lack of care by previous owner. Problem: Clattery drivetrain backlash and clunky gearchange issue.
    Cause and solutions (in order of importance):
    1. Side gear universal joint splines completely dry on both ends. Pack them full of grease. It works wonders. I used Lucas X-TRA Heavy Duty Grease,
    2. Dirty/shite quality engine oil in need of a good replacing. I always use Silkolene Pro-4, but for this bike, I also added 2 table spoons (no more!) of Wynn’s Super Charge Oil Treatment.

    Use this as an additional guide to the Haynes Manual.These are the essential materials I could not have done without, and glad I had them to hand for this particular job:
    27mm ring spanner for rear spindle nut – Halfords Pro.
    14mm ring spanner (mine’s a ratchet) for rear brake stopper bolt – Halfords Pro.
    3/8″ drive metric socket set.
    3 x cans of silicone spray Trim Clean (perfumed) – Specialised Aerosols, Barnsley – eBay in bulk! Perfect for blasting dirt where your fingers can’t reach – and all areas need to be spotless for re-assembly of final drive UJ near the swingarm pivot.
    10 x white toweling face flannels – I buy these 100 at a time from IKEA once a year or so, and treat them as one-use only disposable for dirty jobs (like this one). 25p each.
    Marine grease (or Castrol LM) – don’t use Comma shite.
    While you’re there, If you want to properly waterseal/renew washers for the pannier mounting points – 3 on each side x 3/4″ rubber tap washers off eBay.
    To replace the small rubber washers on all the small screws inside the panniers – 6 on each side x 3/8″ fibre plumbing washers (red) are perfect. Again, only about a quid off eBay – but you then need to wet them and supple them up with two pairs of pliers before fitting them! Better than the rubber standard washers as they can grab and make removing the pannier screws difficult (I had to grind one screw off because of this).
    1 x hand-sized towel (or a tea towel).

    See Haynes Manual for disassembly photos.
    Put the tea towel on the silencer for its protection. Taping it in place is a good idea.
    Open the pannier lock on the left grab rail.
    Remove seat, side panels and rear light assembly cover/topbox, etc.
    Remove grab rails (easier to access the panel behind for cleaning around their mounting points), and disconnect the pannier lock securing clip and remove the lock from the left grab rail.
    CAREFULLY, with your finger, unpop the right hand pannier lock cable from its holder, and disconnect the nipple, from the right hand pannier assembly.
    There is no need to remove the cable as it saves remembering its exact location on re-assembly.
    Open left pannier and remove the 3 screws that hold the rear mudguard on. You can leave the left pannier in place. Even if thorough cleaning is required, you can access all the screws and fasteners to clean and treat them once the rear mudguard is removed.
    Remove right pannier, noting the little screw at the very front of it, and the rear mudguard noting its push-in lugs.
    After removing all the screws inside the case (except the couple that hold the light assembly in place – see Haynes), unhooking the plastic pannier main clip from near the top subframe rail, the right side pannier assembly falls away easily – no forcing required. Make a note of where all the screws go – there are 2 different sizes, but various washer/spacer combinations.

    Check this PDF out for a clearer illustration than Haynes:

    http://owners.honda.com/assets/OWNERLINK/Model/own_man/powersports/motorcycle/2010/10_NT700V_A.pdf

    The silencer prevents complete removal of the brake stopper bolt, but it clears enough to do the job.
    Remove the rear wheel as per Haynes (no need to remove the silencer).
    Now, the important bit you mustn’t skip. Spray down with the silicone cleaner ALL the area around the swingarm and UJ boot so it’s spotless. You’re going to need it clean for refitting the UJ and boot back in place so you don’t push any crap into the joint when you squash the boot closed on its bellows. I found the spray easier than brushing with petrol, as it blasts the dirt away from tiny hard-to-reach areas.

    Pull the driveshaft out as per Haynes. As for the UJ, once the shaft is out, push the UJ backwards into the swingarm as far as you can, separating it from its splines of the transmission side gear shaft. Then, squash the UJ rubber boot closed and then pull it off the bike by passing it through the gap you have just created between the front of the UJ (now resting in the swingarm) and the back of the (short) side gear shaft (fixed in place – no need to touch).

    Remove the UJ in an upwards direction, positioning it towards the shock spring. That is the only way it comes out. Re-assembly is the reverse order, i.e. UJ first inside the back of the swingarm to create the gap, and then squash the boot down and just raunge it through the gap – it makes shape again very easily.

    Note the boot fitting position stamped on the front top tab of the boot.

    Then, in contrast to the Haynes recommendation, first refit the driveshaft through the swingarm to the UJ before then offering up the final drive case. Doing it the Haynes way it’s too heavy to hold it all together while you locate all the splines, and if the UJ falls of the side gear whilst you’re refitting it, you’ll need to fiddle about with your fingers to locate the FRONT of the UJ to its side gear splines.

    The front of the boot pushes onto its front (side gear) housing easily with finger pressure. The back of it though requires 2 sets of pliers to grab the 2 tabs of the boot and pull simultaneously and twist at the same time (slides easily back because you’ve lubed it with the silicone spray), to locate the back end. It does eventually go on easily though.

    Then spray clean all the grease off the exterior of the boot you’ve inevitably left on, otherwise road grime will stick to it like shit to a blanket.
    Best way of completely cleaning off the boot, is to spray cleaner the bottom of the boot, wipe shite away, then rotate it 180 degress, and clean the ‘other’ side – and then just relocate it in the correct position when totally spotless. The rest is as per Haynes.

    My NT700V has gone from a very clunky gear change and a horribly rattly transmission/drivetrain, to no noise at all, and beautifully smooth. Enjoy!
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  7. FREDO RIDER

    FREDO RIDER Enjoying the path !

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  8. Pbro63

    Pbro63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I did this maintenance and the result helped quite a bit, though the OP exagerated a bit as the drivetrain of this bike will never be svelte.
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  9. ptarman

    ptarman Been here awhile Supporter

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    Back in March of 2010, right after I bought my first NT, I rode it down my block one day without a helmet on. It sounded like the engine/tranny was full of rocks. Turns out that's pretty normal. After that, I have never ridden without a helmet and only rarely (and for short distances) without earplugs. It sounds much quieter now. :rofl
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  10. TCBronson

    TCBronson Been here awhile

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    I too have ridden my NT to Alaska and all over as well. I sold it for a CTX1300, then a Africa Twin. But I do miss the NT it was a great bike! 173.JPG 93.JPG
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  11. ptarman

    ptarman Been here awhile Supporter

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    You were braver than my friend and I! We had talked about renting KLRs or something similar in Fairbanks and riding to Prudhoe Bay, but were too chicken to try the NTs with all their plastic on the Haul Road. The construction between Haines Junction and Destruction Bay convinced us we didn't want to hit the Haul Road. Plus Jim was under some time constraints.

    What did you do with the big soft panniers when you headed north?
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  12. TCBronson

    TCBronson Been here awhile

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    I stayed at the college dorms in Fairbanks and stowed some of my gear. You can read about my trip at www.jimbronson.com click on Tom's bike and you will see the ride reports north and south.
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  13. ptarman

    ptarman Been here awhile Supporter

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    I'm reading your story and enjoying it. I cannot believe you saw that many bears. I saw two while I was crossing a bridge riding into Seward and one on the Cassier between Dease Lake and Meziadin Junction. My friend Jim didn't see any until between Smithers and Quick.

    I noticed you stayed at a campground in Dease Lake -- was it the privately-owned one south of town or the provincial one north of town? Jim and I tried the one just south of town and the guy wasn't even polite about telling us that motorcycles weren't welcome.

    I made my trip in 2013 and you can read about it on my blog at www.ptarman1.com.
  14. Mobiker

    Mobiker Long timer Supporter

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    When I was up there in 1992, I only recall seeing a couple of bears until I got to Denali N.P. Took the bus ride into the park. I don't know how many bears I saw from the bus. I stopped counting at a dozen. I had backpacked in the back country of Glacier N. P., which also has a lot of bears, and had just taken normal precautions and not worried about it. I saw so many bears in Denali that I wouldn't have wanted to camp in the back country there.
  15. TCBronson

    TCBronson Been here awhile

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    I honestly don't remember where I stayed. You have quite a blog, very interesting reading!
  16. ptarman

    ptarman Been here awhile Supporter

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    The only time I've been near a bear when camping was at Grant Village in Yellowstone in '94. I was one of the leaders of an intergenerational bicycle camp sponsored by the United Methodist Church. We were on our way back to Jackson Village. We'd had a long bed and everybody else had gone to bed. I went to the nearest bathroom so I could have light to read by for awhile. I walked back to our camp in the dark, got in bed and slept. The next morning we were eating breakfast and a Ranger stopped and asked if anyone had seen the bear. We hadn't. He told us that one had wandered through the campground a couple of times between 10PM and 2PM. Then he showed us some footprints that were about 10 feet from my tent.
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  17. Mobiker

    Mobiker Long timer Supporter

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    The same thing happened to me and my parents. This was a loooong time ago so I don't remember the exact location. Wyoming, Montana, Alberta I think. I was 12-14 years old at the time. We also stayed in a campground that had a baited bear trap in it. That was sobering.

    During the solo Alaska trip on the return, I was on the Cassier and saw a picnic table in a shelter next to a creek in the middle of nowhere. Stopped to have lunch and saw the 55 gallon drum trash can was riddled with bullet holes. Or at least, being an American I assumed they were bullet holes until I got to the picnic table and saw the sign taped to it, "Caution. Bear in area." Looked at the now bear claw holes in the 55 gallon drum. Looked at the sign. Looked around the area. Reaffirmed just how alone I was and decided to have lunch somewhere else :nod
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  18. bross

    bross Where we riding to? Supporter

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    Can't always trust those "bear in area" signs. They get put up but rarely get taken down. We've seen them on notice boards at trail heads and checking in to many camp grounds, and a lot of times the posters will at least date them. When we lived on Vancouver Island we had a nice 10km trail only blocks from the house, which bordered nothing but bush till you hit the west coast. They had two signs: "Bear in area" and "Cougar in area" permanently posted at all the trail heads. Never did see a bear or cougar but cougar sightings were fairly common, probably a couple times a year.

    I don't worry too much what some sign says, and just expect that we may run into wildlife. That's kinda the point of getting back to nature, isn't it? Can't remember how many bears we've seen on dual sport rides here in BC, come around a corner and spook a bear, that either trots off of just carries about it's business. Bears, I don't mind, but those damn cougars scare the crap out of me, sneaky bastards.

    t-shirt they sell at our local hardware store...
    [​IMG]

    or posted at a campground here in BC...
    [​IMG]
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  19. Mobiker

    Mobiker Long timer Supporter

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    Well you gots to consider each individual situation don't ya? Signs you know are permanently posted on a trail close to civilization vs. a sign in middle of nowhere, that's not showing a lot of weathering, obvious signs of bear activity, and you're planning on having food out, where absolutely no help will come if things go sideways, and if help does arrive its going to be a minimum of 4 or 5 hours to get to a hospital if everything goes right. I decided to go on down the road a piece.
    But, you do you.
  20. Pbro63

    Pbro63 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Really dig your TCB website. Remember that show left impressions on me even though I was in first or second grade at the time. Later in high school I had a fixation on motorcycles that I never understood the root of. Maybe that was it !
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