HONDA GL1100/EML question.

Discussion in 'Hacks' started by flexfoot, Apr 5, 2019.

  1. flexfoot

    flexfoot Been here awhile

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    NO........This is not another what tire or what oil is “best” for my bike.
    What I would like to know is what tire pressure are you inflating the front, rear and side car wheel to?
    Quite simple, eh?
    Thanks for your knowledge!


    Steve in NH
    1981 Honda GL1100/EML Sidecar rig
    #1
  2. FLYING EYEBALL

    FLYING EYEBALL out of step

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    what tyre pressure to run on my .... is the new what oil should I run thread.

    It all depends on a bunch of variables.

    Maybe show your Rig along with how much weight you carry and where you carry it.

    :thumb
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  3. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Not to mention the make, model and size of the tires at each location.
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  4. neil p

    neil p Been here awhile

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    20190406_122204.jpg
    In the boot of my '81 R100 EML. If it helps at all.
    20190313_170405.jpg Moto with 15 inch rims and 12 on the tub.
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  5. Bobmws

    Bobmws Curmudgeon At Large

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  6. FR700

    FR700 Heckler ™©®℗

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  7. flexfoot

    flexfoot Been here awhile

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    This is a HONDA GL1100 with a n EML double wide car. Tire size on the m/c is 155x15 inch, front and rear. The car has 125x12 inch tire.
    I weight 150# the generally I an solo.
    So, with this info; what do you recommend for tire pressure on each tire?
    Thanks in advance.


    Steve
    #7
  8. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    The factory front tire for a GL1100 is 18" and the factory rear is 16". So what kind of 15" rims are you using, what is the rim width? They're tubeless, right? And since you say the tire width is 155 then these are car tires? I hope you're aware that with 15-inchers, the type of rim (car or moto) is critical.

    Ditto on the 125x12--this is a tubeless car tire?
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  9. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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  10. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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  11. flexfoot

    flexfoot Been here awhile

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  12. flexfoot

    flexfoot Been here awhile

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    This is an EML rig using a GL1100 as the power. All Michelin automotive tires- automotive type rims.

    The sidecar 12 inch tire is tube type.

    Any clue on proper tire pressures for this unit?

    Thanks in advance.

    Steve
    #12
  13. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    Those classic 15" Michelin tires are pretty sturdy -- I think they have a load rating of over 1000 lbs per tire. If a tire has a more marginal load rating you need to be sure to run adequate pressure to keep them safe. But at over 1000 lbs, air pressure is not nearly as important for those Michelins. I think you could run them at whatever pressure where they feel happy. Of course, never exceed the "Max psi" stamped on the sidewall of the tire.

    I think I'd be inclined to try 32 lbs to start with and see how it steers, and also see how much the tire bulges when the rig is fully loaded with driver and passenger on board. Regarding the "bulginess", you want the tire tread to lay flat on the pavement. Too soft and bulgy and you'll have a tendency to wear the outer shoulders of the tire before the center. Too hard and not bulgy enough and the center will wear out before the edges. As you experiment a bit, you might end up at somewhere like 36 rear and 30 front. Just a guess.

    For the sidecar tire, I expect the inflation level is less critical. I think 26 to 30 lbs would be fine.

    One more quick note - please do check on the age of those tires. I myself feel a little jittery if a tire is more than 6 years old but certainly by the time it's 10 years old you are gonna want to replace it even if it's not worn out. If you're not sure, the DOT date code will look something like this --

    dotdatecode.jpg

    This one here says the tire was manufactured in the 14th week of 2011.
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  14. halflive

    halflive Been here awhile

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    Old EML combo's run on narrow 15"rims. To narrow for a Beetle tire. At that time 2 ply Michelin tires from the 2CV Citroen where fitted. These high tires had almost no structure so where inflated untill they would not wallow. Sometimes 3,5 Bar.
    Now day's there are much stiffer tires so a pressure between 2 and 2,5 Bar could be usefull.
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  15. JimX

    JimX .. .

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  16. flexfoot

    flexfoot Been here awhile

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    Thanks guys for the info....... it is appreciated!

    On another note, those Michelin tires I purchased for the rig are brand new. The bike sat inside for 10 years and I wasn’ t about to use those.

    For your information, Coker Tire has tires for vintage everything. Give them a shout, they are good people to do business with and EXTREMELY knowledgeable.

    Ride safe everyone-
    Steve
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  17. DRONE

    DRONE Dog Chauffeur

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    When you're out and about on a trip or whatever, and if you ever need to replace one of those 155-R15 classic tires, that size is almost identical to the modern tire size of 155/80-15. Not a lot of dealers stock that size, but you're more likely to find one of those than a 155-R15. BTW, a SR15, HR15 or VR15 are also fine -- those are higher speed rated tires.

    This is the BF Goodrich Radial T/A 155/80-15 with a UTQG of 400-A-B and a bitchin' tread pattern that starts out a full 11/32nds---->

    bfradialta.jpg
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  18. davebig

    davebig Another Angry Hun !

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    DRONE might be onto something there ! Is this the GL1100/EML that sold recently in or around Chicago ?
    I don't care for the Coker repop Michelin's I'd rather use the Nankangs and the tall tires do need more tire pressure thank the modern rigs with wider 14-15" newer stuff.
    #18
  19. cycleman2

    cycleman2 Long timer

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    That rim and tire size are pretty standard for the EML rigs of that era. EML made their own wheels. A friend of mine has the same rig, front end & car with BMW power. I'm pretty sure he runs the 135 car tire width but I could be wrong. As to tire dates. A Michelin factory tech told me max 10 yrs for their tires. If it was on a 2 wheel bike I'd change it, but if no cracks and good tread then it should still be good for a year or so.
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  20. 2004ret

    2004ret Adventurer Supporter

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    Hi,

    I have owned a 85 GL1200 with an EML Tour T chair since 2011. Original owner of this BMW Motorrad St Louis assembled rig recommended 42 PSI in all three wheels. I have played with air pressures and have settled at 42 psi front and rear, and 36 in the chair. Up front is a 125R15 Firestone, chair is a 135R15 Firestone, and rear is a 145R15Michelin, all from Coker, all tubeless mounted on the stock EML rims. I have found that these higher pressures in the bike tires provide for the smoothest ride combined with responsive handling. I have also found that chasing tire pressure settings is influenced by the type and condition of the shock absorbers. I replaced shock absorbers a few years back with YSS shocks and that's when I settled on tire pressures, as I found that the new shocks worked well with the higher tire pressures. Good Luck, will be interested to hear what pressures you eventually decide to run. I must also compliment all the contributors on this website. They provide valuable guidance to this sidecar community, so thanks to all of you!
    #20
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