Honda Reflex engine swap.

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by Gbmike1x, Dec 13, 2019.

  1. Gbmike1x

    Gbmike1x Been here awhile

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    Hi new guy here with a question. I have a 2002 Honda Reflex, just bought a 2003 with a blown engine. My question is how easy is it to swap out for a non- mechanic. The 2002 has some electrical problems and the new one with the blown engine is working perfectly electrically lights and such. Thanks.
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  2. baloneyskin daddy

    baloneyskin daddy bikaholic Super Supporter

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    The worst part is removing all the bodywork. After that its trying to support the frame because the center stand is mounted to the engine.
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  3. Gbmike1x

    Gbmike1x Been here awhile

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    Ok cool, so it's pretty straight forward thing. Am I going to need any special tools and should I use the carb from the engine I'm swapping or the carb on the new bike?
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  4. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    I use 2x4s a lot for supporting bikes. A long time ago I built a small dolly with casters out of 2x4s for removing and installing air cooled VW engines. It worked great when I had to remove the engine in my Vulcan 750 to replace the stator. Just rolled it under the engine, put shims between the dolly and engine, unbolted the engine and rolled it out from under the bike. You should be able to support the scooter with 2x4s while removing the engine and centerstand.

    I don't like it when they attach the centerstand to the engine. My Honda Metropolitan was that way, and I'd bang the stand on speed bumps every once in a while. Sure enough, I later saw a Metropolitan with broken engine cases caused from banging the centerstand. The engine cases are very thin aluminum.
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  5. Gbmike1x

    Gbmike1x Been here awhile

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    I was thinking I could make something out of a old long board I have. Thanks for the info.
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  6. bandito2

    bandito2 Been here awhile

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    Umm... No it isn't; the center stand is frame mounted. So here is some better info: I have 2001, 2004, 2006 ABS and 2007 Honda NSS250 Reflex scooters, each of which have had the engine taken off and put back in at least once... a couple of them more than once.

    One of the more challenging parts is putting the engine back up in on the hanger... lifting it up and in just right requires some muscle and finesse. Lots of tedious (but doable by yourself) work hooking up hoses and making sure they route to and from to their correct connection points. Hooking up the throttle cables and the carburetor snorkle can be tough because of limited space. BTW, the easier way to drop the engine is with the rear wheel still on the axle (with the muffler removed)... it supports the rear half of the engine and makes it easier to move around a' la wheelbarrow style.

    The body work actually comes off fairly easy, (relatively speaking) but one needs to exercise patience and care to not break mounting tabs on removal and replacement. And the key lock for the seat release may or may not have you feeling clumsy trying to hook the cable back onto the key lock mechanism.

    The electrical connections are not much of a problem since they are different enough from each other so that you can't accidentally plug something into the wrong connector. (some of them can be difficult to get unplugged in the first place though.)

    Other than that... it's a piece of cake... but I've done it enough times so that it all seems easy to me... and of course, YMMV. But, being able to refer to a service manual goes a long way to making things easier.
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  7. baloneyskin daddy

    baloneyskin daddy bikaholic Super Supporter

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    Yea ,sorry about that,I was thinking of my 600 Silverwing that I just had the engine out of this spring. I did a swap on a Reflex a few yrs ago . The big end con rod bearing just seized on the damn thing with no warning. When I tore the engine down it was spotless inside outside of that problem. The replacement engine was purchased on E-bay for $175 but it was stripped of all its covers ,electronics and drivetrain which had to be swapped from the old engine.
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  8. Gbmike1x

    Gbmike1x Been here awhile

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    Thanks for the info. I have the service manual it shows everything I'm going to have to do a little daunting for me but I have a mechanical buddy to help.
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  9. rdhood

    rdhood Been here awhile Supporter

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    Dont be too intimidated. One of the reasons that I have a reflex is because I have done some engine things on a GY6 that I never thought I would do. It turns out to be a lot easier than you might think. For me, it is time consuming and I invariably hit roadblock after roadblock on my way to a solution (lots of cursing, to be sure). But somehow I manage to understand it, and the next time I have to do it I think...what was my problem last time? Its a lot like riding to a destination that you have never been with sketchy directions. The first time there, it seems to take FOREVER. Subsequent times dont ever seem nearly as bad. It is the dread of the unknown. But label the hell out of EVERYTHING with tape and stickies, take bolts off and put them in little labeled plastic bags, take pictures at EVERY step where you think you might forget how things go together (and a lot even if you do think you will remember).
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  10. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

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    It's nice if you have a hydraulic jack with wheels, on a fairly smooth floor. It's a big help raising the front of the engine to line up with the linkage that connects to the frame. Also, you should at least examine the bushings between the linkage and the engine and also the same linkage at frame ends. They are cheap and easy to replace if the engine is out.
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  11. Gbmike1x

    Gbmike1x Been here awhile

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  12. minimac

    minimac Long timer

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    Good job. Would you do it again?
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  13. Gbmike1x

    Gbmike1x Been here awhile

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    I hope not lol. But yeah I did learn a lot.
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  14. Salth2ofish

    Salth2ofish Long timer

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    Picking up my first scooter on Thursday. A 2002 250 reflex with 11,500 miles. Excellent condition except for broken place on plastic where it fell over on a trailer. I’m so looking forward to it.
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