Honda Super Cub C125

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by cabanza, Oct 26, 2017.

  1. DaBinChe

    DaBinChe Long timer

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    back to the SC
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  2. ski-line900

    ski-line900 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I might have to get that windscreen and center rack, looks good.

    Not sure about the exhaust being more period correct, but you have easier access to the axle nut.
  3. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    Most of this is patently false.

    The twin cam is just as rebuildable as the EVO. You do NOT have to throw half of it away to rebuild it. The M8 with a balance shaft followed 18 years of prior twin cam construction with balance shafts in all Softail engines. Your 2006 sportster is full of metric fasteners, metric parts, and Asian parts of Asian design and manufacture. Just because your sissy bar has SAE fasteners doesn’t mean the rest of the bike does.

    I do not care what system of measure people use. I do not care what gear pattern they build into the Cub for the US or anywhere else. I am able to adapt, as opposed to being recalcitrant. I’m much more interested in the Trail Hunter than I am in the Super Cub, and however it is set up out of the box I’m sure it will be quite enjoyable, gear patterns and metric fasteners be damned.
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  4. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    I’ll also add that those Luddite-tastic posts are what it looks like when someone stagnates. The world keeps spinning, and it keeps orbiting the sun as our solar system speeds through the Milky Way at over a half-million miles per hour (514,000, or 828,000 kmh for you metric heads). I’m glad it does. The fact that everything keeps moving - including technology is the reason we have this wave of great little bikes becoming available again. What’s old may be new again, and what’s new will be old again - but always with improvements learned through experiences gained over (space) time.

    Far out, man!
  5. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar Supporter

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    To all of the Luddites who hate the metric system and refuse to support it;
    How are you able to access the internet?

    I mean, every CPU in existence, including chips made in the USA are metric.

    I am a Mechanical Design Engineer by training/trade, and I LOATH the SAE system with a passion!!!
    None of the divisions make any sense, they are just thrown about at random.

    Fractional to decimal is a mess because there are so many fractional divisions.
    12 inches to the foot
    but...
    3 feet to a yard
    5280 feet per mile
    Furlongs?
    Fathoms?
    Nautical Miles?

    3 teaspoons per tablespoon,
    but...
    16 tablespoons per cup!
    and 1/3 of a cup is a valid measurement, which is how many tablespoons???
    Not an even division, that is for sure.
    and how many cubic inches/feet/yards are any of those equal to???
    I have NO idea without having to look it up or doing multiple conversions if calculating by hand.

    And mister Fahrenheit should be dug up just so that we can pummel him!
    Do you know how he decided that 32-degrees should be the freezing point of water, and 212-degrees the boiling point?
    Because his wife's birthday was February 12th, and at the time he created his scale she was 32 years old...
    SO, we have a temperature scale that measures the difference between when his wife was being frigid to him, versus when she was boiling mad....
    GAH!!!!!
    :becca

    It will drive you crazy trying to make any sense of it.

    YMMV
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  6. cabanza

    cabanza Smooth is Fast

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    So how about that Super Cub, eh?

    This thread needs more pics!

    Still my favorite color...

    [​IMG]
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  7. DaBinChe

    DaBinChe Long timer

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    I'm really digging the red seat of 60th anniversary. Also just notice after washing that the "white" leg shield has a pearl/metallic in it.
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  8. DaBinChe

    DaBinChe Long timer

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    Yeah maybe not period correct or original cub but stylistically it looks much better and matches.
  9. Tromper

    Tromper Sagaciously Annoying Supporter

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    Nothing wrong with the English system, long's you can count by 64ths :)

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  10. Chillis

    Chillis Long timer Supporter

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    It is light blue.
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  11. siyeh

    siyeh unproductive Supporter

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    What kind of wind screen is that?
    looks good
  12. DaBinChe

    DaBinChe Long timer

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    Asahi
  13. ski-line900

    ski-line900 Been here awhile Supporter

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    To each his own. If you want quiet the stock seems the way to go.

    I noticed that you install the crank support bearing on your SC and Monkey, wonder if this actually extends life of the crank at all. Also, usually bearings are press fit, and those just slopped in, worry about the freeplay.
  14. Aj Mick

    Aj Mick Long timer

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    I have ridden motorcycles with various transmissions, including CVT automatic, right and left side shifter manual, three, four, five and six speed with various shifting patterns, as well as manual and automatic clutch....... About the only ones I have not used are the hand change with foot clutch (WW2 vintage and earlier Indians among others), and the automated manual double clutch system used on some overly complex modern machines. Despite the odd glitch initially when changing between bikes, I have found little problem with adapting. Just takes a little conscious effort at first.

    Likewise for riding on either side of the road..... Have mainly lived in countries that drive on the left (NZ, UK, Japan and Thailand) but have found little problem in adapting in places that customarily drive on the right (Europe, Laos and Mayamar in my experience). Again, it just takes a little conscious effort at first.

    ABS does not interfere with the operation of a bike in normal use on the road. While ABS does seem to have some merit on motorcycles, I doubt that it is the life / accident saver that it can be on cars. The dynamics of a 4 wheel vehicle and a 2 wheel vehicle are quite different. I can take or leave ABS on a motorcycle.... and fail to see the the need on a small machine such as the Super Cub. It is just there to meet design rules in some countries.... Adds unnecessary weight and complexity as far as I'm concerned.

    The USA adopted the metric system back in the 19th century....... The weights and measures commonly used in the USA are defined in metric units.... Dunno why ya'll have not just adopted the metric system wholesale like most of the rest of the world. There are only three holdouts, the USA, Liberia and Myanmar (Burma).... and I guess the last uses proper Imperial units, not the Americanised ones.

    Under the Mendenhall Order of 1893, metric standards, developed through international cooperation under the auspices of BIPM, were officially adopted as the fundamental standards for length and mass in the United States, though some metric standards were used in practice before then. The definitions of United States customary units, such as the foot and pound, have been based on metric units since then. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_the_United_States





    Growing up in NZ I learned to use Imperial weights and measures, and our currency was pounds, shillings and pence. We want metric for currency in 1967, and for weights and measures a few years after that. I have no problem using imperial units, and still sometimes do, but in truth the metric system makes much more sense.

    To say that to use SAE is to be American displays ignorance of reality.
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  15. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    I never said I hated the metric system. Just about everything I own is metric, except parts of the Sportster, and my 2 old cars. I have invested a fortune in metric tools. I am now more familiar with metric tools and fasteners than SAE. There is just something comforting about SAE tools and fasteners.

    As far as the earth continuing to orbit the sun like it always has, there is an example of something that hasn't changed. But I actually wish would. I would prefer a more circular orbit, about where it is during winter. It would super nice here hear in AZ. Of course other parts of the world would be under snow and Ice year round, but you can't have everything.

    You don't need to know exactly how a computer works to use one. Back in the 90s I built computers. Or maybe I should say assembled. Where you bought an empty case with a power supply, then selected all the other parts based on what you wanted. All you needed to know was what was compatible with what.

    The main part of new technology I object to it what is being used on vehicles, like bikes, cars, and airplanes. I have not flown since the TSA showed up, but I would be a bit uncomfortable on a plane being flown by a computer. Smartphones are my other major problem with it. I believe they are destroying society. My own kids are upset because my flip phone does not include texting. I sat in the car yesterday with my oldest daughter as she used her smartphone to text her husband. That is a bit ridiculous to me. I think the best use of new technology is using it to replicate old technology. Old vehicles were built with old manufacturing methods (yet still managed to be cheaper than new ones by quite a bit, taking inflation into account) It used to be that repairing or restoring a vintage vehicle was extremely expensive. You had to go through the expensive process of making and sitting up the tooling to make only a few of any one part. Today you can use modern manufacturing methods to make one or a thousand of those parts relatively cheaply. That allows me to buy reproduction parts for my old cars without spending a fortune. Same with old '50s and '60s Harleys and British bikes.

    I for one would not at all mind having a new copy of an old bike or car made with modern technology. I just wouldn't want any electronic technology ON it. Many vintage vehicle enthusiasts complain about vehicles being "over restored" They actually wasn't the flaws in the original vehicle left intact. Not me. I want it to be as perfect as it can possibly be.

    Not everything is about function. Most people who love old vehicles love their style and simplicity. The fact that they may not be as functional as newer ones is irrelevant. They are toys. Somethi9ng to enjoy. The metric system may indeed be better, but being an older American, I still love the SAE system. What I don't like is not having the choice to buy a vehicle without all this modern technology. My old cars, Stella, and Enfield work just fine. But imagine how much better and more reliable they would be if they were manufactured using modern methods, materials, and built to modern standards. I'm not talking about a new "retro" design, I'm talking about building a new, almost exact replica of an old design. Even a points and condenser ignition could be built better today than it was back then. And an original design Super Cub could be replicated, to a much higher standard, than it was originally. It would retain all it's original technology, with the exception of wire spoke wheels designed for tubeless tires. I believe tube type tires are the most dangerous part on any motorcycle that has them.
  16. CactusWren

    CactusWren Been here awhile

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    Wrong. Winter (in the northern hemisphere) is not due to the Earth's position in its elliptical orbit. In fact, during Winter (in the northern hemisphere) the Earth is closer to the Sun than it is in Summer. Earth's seasons are due to its 23 degree tilt of its axis. Why don't you stick to what you know.
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  17. ski-line900

    ski-line900 Been here awhile Supporter

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    I think we should be done with the metric/SAE conversation.
  18. CactusWren

    CactusWren Been here awhile

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    While it is true that almost all wire spoked motorcycle wheels are tubed, BMW has wire spoked wheels which are tubeless, on their Rxxxx GS models. There are probably others.
  19. cabanza

    cabanza Smooth is Fast

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    Can you all stop? If you would like to discuss metric vs. SAE, please make a thread. This is the Super Cub thread.
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  20. JerryH

    JerryH To Each Their Own Supporter

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    The earth being closer to the sun has to make some difference.

    The first wire spoke wheels specifically designed for tubeless tires were on the 1986 Honda Rebel 450. I have no idea why that didn't catch on. https://i.ebayimg.com/images/i/311905563385-0-1/s-l1000.jpg That was 33 years ago. Over 3 decades. Now we have EFI and ABS, but still don't have something as simple as tubeless tires on motorcycles. Since it has been so long, you would thing DOT would have required them on all street bikes a long time ago. They do require a lot of less important things.

    Yes, I'm done with the metric vs SAE thing. But I do wish the new Super Cub had tubeless wire wheels.