Honda Super Cub C125

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by cabanza, Oct 26, 2017.

  1. Chillis

    Chillis Long timer Supporter

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    Took the Cub out to run some errands. Used the heel shifter to upshift and didn't miss a beat. Probably should still drop it at a Honda dealer and have them go through it.

    I feel like I've owned the bike for years but it has only been a couple of months.

    Going to do the oil filter and valve adjust. After that I feel a Death Valley day trip in my future.
    kevrags and MYUMPH like this.
  2. vintagegarage

    vintagegarage Adventurer

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    I finally was able to order a red 2020 Super Cub at my local dealer today in Florida.. estimating an end of December delivery.
  3. Asuma

    Asuma Adventurer

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    I just installed mine. The inner plastic cover over the battery was a pain to deal with.
    hondacubber likes this.
  4. DaBinChe

    DaBinChe Long timer

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    yeah that was a pain.....no space to put the plug end anywhere.
    hondacubber likes this.
  5. skycart

    skycart Been here awhile

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    Went on a great ride today, but my SC is making some nasty chain noise. Sort of a whirring, but turns into more of a clunking at lower speed. Chain slack/tightness is within spec. Any ideas?

  6. ski-line900

    ski-line900 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Don't know how it should sound while running on the stand, but it sounds like it's loose.
    DaBinChe and villageidiot like this.
  7. ErikDK

    ErikDK Been here awhile

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    The hump is an option, it is not a necessity to use a tubeless tire on a rim originally designed for tubed tires.

    You are aware that it's the air pressure itself that keeps all tires - except those fitted withe tire clamps - in place on the rim?
  8. ski-line900

    ski-line900 Been here awhile Supporter

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    You're taking over multiple threads with this...
  9. Tromper

    Tromper Sagaciously Annoying Supporter

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    And when ya pull a nail and don't catch it right away air pressure declines, sometimes sharply.....
    You do you, but I'll stick with the advice of folks who've done a conversion if I go that route. It probably won't be a problem on a given day.

    Cheers

    Tromper

    "Safety tip: Check to see if your tube-type wheel has a safety bead near the lip of the rim. It’s there to keep the tire on the rim in case of a blowout and help seat it properly. Some tube-type rims don’t have them."



  10. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    So what oil is best?
  11. DaBinChe

    DaBinChe Long timer

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    Extra Virgin
    =retread= and Tromper like this.
  12. LE Trainer

    LE Trainer Bad Buddhist

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    Lube your chain.
  13. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar Supporter

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    This both amuses me, as well as providing actual power and torque data for the SC.
    Putting a 125cc scooter on a dyno just seems... overkill? (underkill?)



    2019 Super Cub on CycleWorld.com dyno:
    8.12 hp @ 7,120 rpm
    7.07 lb-ft @ 5,110 rpm
  14. DaBinChe

    DaBinChe Long timer

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    It's good to know the dyno numbers at what rpm.
    BMWzenrider likes this.
  15. ErikDK

    ErikDK Been here awhile

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    Whenever people post stupid shit about the safety hump, in essence stating that it's the hump that keeps inflated tubeless tires on the rim, and that a punctured tube will keep the tire on a rim without the hump, whereas a punctured tubeless tire on the same rim will roll off immediately.
    bikeridermark likes this.
  16. BMWzenrider

    BMWzenrider The Road Scholar Supporter

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    OK....
    I am a mechanical engineer who formerly worked for the tire retreading company, Bandag.
    The USTMA annual Factbook lived on my desk for many years.
    {USTMA = United States Tire Manufacturers Association}
    It covers all manner of specifications and design data for both tires and the rims that they are designed to mate with.

    -----

    The "hump" (proper term is safety contour) on the bead seat diameter of a rim is there for several reasons, and yes, one of them is to help keep the tire bead seated if you get a flat.
    -One of the reasons that is a good thing, is that your CO2 cartridges, can of fix-a-flat, foot operated air pump, or tiny 12v pump will not generate the volumetric flow required to reseat the bead after you find and fix the cause of the air loss. With a tube inside the tire, the volumetric flow rate is immaterial. You can refill a tubed truck tire with a bicycle pump given enough time.

    - One of the other big reasons is to help maintain the seal at the bead if you corner hard with an under-inflated tire.
    On a tubed tire, even if running very low pressures, the air stays in the tube if the bead of the tire separates from the rim momentarily due to a severe bump or side force. With a tubeless tire, if the bead rolls off the seat, even momentarily, you will experience a sudden loss of air pressure; which is BAD...

    So, does the safety contour ("hump") help keep an inflated tire seated onto the rim?
    Yes.

    Does the safety contour absolutely guarantee that a tubeless tire will not become unseated or roll off of the rim in the above or other situations?
    No.

    But it does, by design, go a LONG way towards forestalling that from happening; which is a GOOD thing.

    -----

    Now, lets talk briefly about tube type rims without the safety contour on the bead seat diameter:

    Yes, a tubeless tire will become unseated from that style of rim much more easily if you are running low air pressures or lose pressure completely.
    NO, a punctured tube inside the tire in no way helps keep the tire bead seated any better than for the tubeless tire on the same rim.
    (unless you are running a foam-filled tube, which is an uncommon special case)
    BUT, a tube inside a tire WILL keep the air inside and prevent sudden & catastrophic air loss if the bead rolls a bit due to low pressure or hard cornering forces.

    So, No, if there is no air inside the tire there is no magical safety advantage between tubed or tubeless tires on a tube-type rim (without the "hump").
    BUT, if there is a tube installed in a tube-type rim, there is a safety advantage when running low pressures or under heavy side loading of the tire.

    -----

    Tube-Type tire with a tube on a tubeless rim?

    The safety contour will work just like a tubeless tire if you get a flat, which, by the way, will make it more difficult for you to break the bead to repair/replace the punctured tube.
    'nuff said.

    -----

    Can you safely run a tube-type tire without a tube on a tubeless rim which has the safety contour?
    Yes, but...

    One of the differences in construction of a tubeless versus tube-type tire is the inner liner of the tubeless tire.
    The inner liner is the same type of low-permeability rubber used to make tubes, so that migration of air molecules occurs more slowly.
    (it losses air less quickly)

    The construction of some tube-type tires are thick enough and have at least one layer of rubber compound which is dense enough to work fine without a tube.
    But some are much more porous, so you will need to keep an eye on air pressure MUCH more frequently.
    Also some tube-type tires have a bit more flexible and "looser" beads, which can make them difficult to get the bead sealed well on the rim; and more likely to break the seal at the bead when running low pressures or when flat.


    ------------------------------

    One last item, since we are on the subject of mixing/matching tires & rims.

    Darksiding.
    (using an automotive tire on a motorcycle wheel)

    Yes, it CAN, and has been done very safely.
    I have personally carved through the Black Hills on a R1200RT with an all-season passenger car tire mounted on the rear wheel.
    And I do mean "Carved".
    I like to get the bike leaned over.

    ONE CAVEAT!!!
    The bead seat diameter of motorcycle and passenger car tires is the exact same across the board....
    EXCEPT for 15" rims/tires.

    For some stupid reason (I think it was the French), the standard for the 15" bead seat diameter of a wheel/tire designated for motorcycles is just a bit larger than for a 15" automotive rim/tire.

    If you try to force a 15" car tire onto a 15" motorcycle rim, you will quite likely damage the internal structure of the tire bead from overstretching it.
    And if that damaged bead lets go explosively while you are zooming down the road...
    ... Well, that would also be BAD...


    --------------------------------------

    Modern tires are generally a high quality product which are overbuilt for the specified pressures, loads, speeds, etc.
    The body/carcass of the tire is very sturdy and able to be safely used much longer than in days of yore.
    You can get away with a whole heap of stuff if needed to get you out of a pinch.
    But my personal advice is to put a tube in there if either the tire or rim is designed for tubes, especially if you like to air down when going off road.


    Now that we have that subject covered properly by someone who has worked in the tire industry,
    can we PLEASE get back to taking about the Super Cub???

    Thank you.
    Xchemie, ErikDK, der_saeufer and 7 others like this.
  17. Moat

    Moat Been here awhile

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    YaY!! :clap Nice job, BMWzenrider!

    Bob
  18. vintagegarage

    vintagegarage Adventurer

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    May 28, 2019
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    Florida
    Has anyone who has a red 2020 Supercub on order heard anything about the actual delivery date of their Supercub? The original announcement from Western Honda mentioned for November delivery, and my dealer is saying December delivery, but I haven't heard any updates, or if they have actually been shipped..
  19. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    But what it I want to dark side my Cub, but on the front instead of the rear, using a tubeless tire with a tube on a tubeless spoke 15” motorcycle rim at 5 psi? Will it work, or will I tear a hole in the fabric of space time?
  20. JCSS1976

    JCSS1976 n00b Supporter

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    This covers one of my favorite overheard at work statements. If it is F'D up it was probably designed by drunks or the french.

    J.




    One last item, since we are on the subject of mixing/matching tires & rims.

    Darksiding.
    (using an automotive tire on a motorcycle wheel)

    Yes, it CAN, and has been done very safely.
    I have personally carved through the Black Hills on a R1200RT with an all-season passenger car tire mounted on the rear wheel. And I do mean "Carved". I like to get the bike leaned over.

    ONE CAVEAT!!!
    The bead seat diameter of motorcycle and passenger car tires is the exact same across the board.... EXCEPT for 15" rims/tires.

    For some stupid reason (I think it was the French), the standard for the 15" bead seat diameter of a wheel/tire designated for motorcycles is just a bit larger than for a 15" automotive rim/tire.
    If you try to force a 15" car tire onto a 15" motorcycle rim, you will quite likely damage the internal structure of the tire bead from overstretching it.
    And if that damaged bead lets go explosively while you are zooming down the road...
    ... Well, that would also be BAD...
    BMWzenrider likes this.