How big are ADV bikes going to get?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by DesertPilot, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,556
    Location:
    Wellington,New Zealand
    totally agree, thats why i think these bikes should not go there....
    #81
  2. BlueM00se

    BlueM00se 'Cuse LAX Fan Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2012
    Oddometer:
    2,618
    Location:
    Southern State of Confusion
    It's kinda funny. There's a thread on here that raises the point that Brand Bashing is for the Birds, but then we have this thread where size bashing is OK! Different tools for different situations. My Triumph Explorer is great for the riding I want to do. Comfortable upright ergonomics, great power, suspension and handling, plenty of electric output for heated gear and auxiliary lights. I can ride it comfortably all day with a smile on my face and easily go on any "maintained" road. Yup, it's too heavy for me to handle on true off road conditions, so I guess it never should have been built and some of you will call me a poser even though I don't have it outfitted to go "off road".

    It's amazing the number of people who will put down a bike (and rider) just because the bike wasn't designed for the type riding they choose to do.
    #82
    JETalmage and ErictheBiking like this.
  3. SFC_Ren

    SFC_Ren Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2013
    Oddometer:
    547
    Location:
    Salem,Oregon
    Hmm, seems to me only people that have an insecurity about being a poser, would be defending being a poser? There are lots of upright, cushy suspended, full on sport-touring bike/Standard bikes that can go down a gravel road and offer better protection from the wind and elements than your tiger. You don't NEED to defend why you bought your bike to ride around on the road for, but then again don't try to logic out your emotional, illogical decision to buy it.

    #83
  4. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2011
    Oddometer:
    27,225
    Location:
    Western Sierras
    I remember the first time I went riding in Death Valley. I was on my XL600, and about to ride down a narrow ridge into a gravel wash. I was a little apprehensive about it, and paused at the top. At that moment, a guy rode around me, and right down the hill into the gravel with no trouble at all. He was riding a fully loaded BMW R1200GS with a passenger on the back. :eekers

    For me, that bike would be strictly pavement and fire roads. For him, it was an all terrain dual sport. It's the rider, much more than the bike.
    #84
  5. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 18, 2014
    Oddometer:
    615
    Location:
    Mountain View, CA
    I wouldn't say there's been much size-bashing here. People have been remarkably restrained. There also seems to be a general consensus that 1) large adv bikes are an excellent tool for adv touring, 2) they don't seem likely to get too much larger, 3) when things get tough, it's the rider not the bike, and 4) many people would like to see more mid-size bikes like the KTM and 'will they ever get around to releasing it' Yahama in the 500-700cc and under 400 lb range. I found this near-unanimity of opinion quite interesting.

    There has, however, been fair bit of Jeep bashing :D
    #85
    cyclopathic likes this.
  6. bomose

    bomose Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,418
    Location:
    Dixie
    I read a story about the first guy to ride the Alaska Highway. He was an AAF veteran from Alabama and did it on a Harley in 1946, I think. The only gas along the way was sparse and were in 5 or 10 gallon cans. Guys were tougher back then. I bet it weighed a lot. Any bike without a lot of plastic to break can be an adventure bike.
    #86
    DesertPilot and mikegc like this.
  7. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    13,441
    Location:
    Huntsville , Al
    I remember the first (and only) time I went riding in Death Valley. I was on an 83 Yamaha Venture full dress touring bike. I remember looking at the entrance to Titus Canyon and wishing I had a more suitable bike. On my way out I took some torn up twisty paved road through the Panamint Mountains. At one point the pavement ended and there was a frozen creek I needed to cross. I ended up doing it but there was a bit of a pucker factor. Again I wished for a more suitable bike.

    Years later when it was time to replace that Venture I bought an R1100GS. I never did any extreme off road or rode it to Starbucks but it was IMO the best all around bike available back in 94. I rode it with my sportbike friends and also did two up trips with my wife.
    #87
    bomose likes this.
  8. bomose

    bomose Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,418
    Location:
    Dixie
    #88
    bromax, TheBritAbroad and mikegc like this.
  9. bomose

    bomose Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,418
    Location:
    Dixie
  10. bomose

    bomose Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,418
    Location:
    Dixie
    Nor nearly as old as I .
    #90
    mikegc likes this.
  11. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    6,496
    Sometimes it just happens and I don't mean Dempster just your regular highway repair detour. As my friend put it nicely "don't come to Mexico during rain season"
    #91
  12. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    6,496
    So what in your mind ADV bike is "designed for"? Would it include hitting a detour section on paved highway?
    #92
  13. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    6,496
    The friend of mine rode Alcan first time in early 70s.. before it got paved. It was different experience back then and those bikes were half the size back then.
    #93
    bomose likes this.
  14. bomose

    bomose Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Oddometer:
    3,418
    Location:
    Dixie
    Yes, definitely a different experience. No GPS, Spot, or cell phones. No 9" travel suspensions and heated gear. In 50 years from now we may have our own personal transporter devices to get us out of trouble.:lol3 That's, of course, if the gov't allows us to operate our own vehicles.
    #94
    mikegc likes this.
  15. redneckK20

    redneckK20 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2013
    Oddometer:
    476
    Location:
    Hannibal, MO
    I have just a top box on my 1190r and always keep it pretty light because I prefer single day trips with off-road challenges rather than multi-day trips of on-road stuff. Not saying it's the right tool for the job but man there's a ton of satisfaction in following guys on normal dirtbikes on your 500+ lb street bike and staying on their heels.
    #95
  16. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    13,920
    Location:
    the hills
    I recall a few stories of guys chasing those old fat guys and wondering "How in the fuck?????"
    #96
    TheBritAbroad likes this.
  17. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,556
    Location:
    Wellington,New Zealand
    most definitely.i dont hesitate to ride gravel roads on ANY bike that i have owned.
    #97
  18. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Oddometer:
    6,496
    How about if it rains and turns in mudfest?
    #98
  19. advNZer?

    advNZer? Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,556
    Location:
    Wellington,New Zealand
    operative word here is GRAVEL .Dirt roads in the rain?Thats a different question.
    #99
    DesertPilot likes this.
  20. PeterTrocewicz

    PeterTrocewicz Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2009
    Oddometer:
    402
    Location:
    Kincardine Ontario
    Here's my Bonnie on wash day (Saturday). It poured rain on Friday, and I worked on clay and gravel road which became real nasty when it was wet.
    The dirt road was the main reason I chose the Bonnie over a routing cruiser when I was buying.
    WIN_20170910_14_01_13_Pro.jpg
    DesertPilot likes this.