1. Adventure Rider Print Magazine!
    We're doing a print magazine this November - 128 pages of high quality adventure riding stories, photography and interviews!

    Click here to purchase a copy for $9. Limited copies still available.
    Dismiss Notice

How do I get these bolts out please?

Discussion in 'Australia' started by Scottyx, Sep 29, 2020.

  1. Bluetonguejak

    Bluetonguejak Pretend racer

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Oddometer:
    3,336
    Location:
    Gippsland
    Look familiar?

    20201008_175611.jpg
    #21
    BergDonk, GodSilla and Precis like this.
  2. Scottyx

    Scottyx Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2017
    Oddometer:
    174
    Location:
    Sydney
    I only have the manual on CD and it's a bit of a prick to find the right manual so I haven't looked for a while.

    I have tried a big hammer and copper drift and belted the crap out of the bolts, then put the rattle gun back on them and still no movement.

    I reckon I'll look for somewhere to drop it off and have someone do it for me.

    Apparently there is a face book group for Tenere, but I don't really know how to work that stuff out on face book.
    #22
  3. Hay Ewe

    Hay Ewe Just a Wannabe

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    6,935
    Location:
    FNQ - AUS
    #23
  4. Paul124ac

    Paul124ac Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2015
    Oddometer:
    3,306
    Location:
    NE Vic
    There are varying strengths of Loctite used to secure threads, if Yam used the green one in this application then destruction of the bolts is the only way to release the part. I’d be seeking as much info as I could, I don’t reckon you’re the first to ever remove this like @Hay Ewe infers.
    #24
  5. gateman

    gateman Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2009
    Oddometer:
    1,891
    Location:
    Norther NSW, Australia
    I have BAHCO tools going backto 1977. Solid good stuff.
    #25
    Sebastionbear and Kiwirich like this.
  6. Scottyx

    Scottyx Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2017
    Oddometer:
    174
    Location:
    Sydney
    67FA6A02-CCE6-455E-B31B-74BEDEEBB3CB.jpeg Finally I got motivation to have another look at it.

    I drilled some holes through the work bench and bolted the barstard down added heat and a long breaker bar.

    Once the bolts cracked they came out with no resistance by hand. So the stake did nothing to make it tight.
    #26
    badmanners, GodSilla, saltyD and 9 others like this.
  7. Scottyx

    Scottyx Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2017
    Oddometer:
    174
    Location:
    Sydney
    1912ED3F-CAB0-463D-BA0F-9FD318B79D66.jpeg My mate popped over on this and that’s why I got round to doing it actually.
    #27
  8. GodSilla

    GodSilla I did that.

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12,958
    Location:
    GodSowncountry Australia
    If heat made a difference they were probably loctited in with a strong thread locker compound. Glad you got it done eh.:thumbup
    #28
    ZoomerP and Kiwirich like this.
  9. Dee Cee

    Dee Cee Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    614
    Location:
    Newlyn. Victoria.
    If you are worried about a naked flame next to things you can use a large soldering iron on the end of the bolt and maybe enough heat will help the loctite (or anything else) release.

    Just spent nearly eight hours getting 4 x M 20 10.9 grade broken bolts out of an excavator track beam. That was fun, my shoulders were sick of holding up the drill to get a hole through them so as I could cut them out with an oxy and then weld shit on to them to slowly work them out. All for the sake of some never-seize during assembly. Every bolt or screw I pull out and re fit gets a dob of grease on all my machinery unless stipulated otherwise.

    I was at the mower shop on the weekend and some bloke was trying to change his blades on a ride on, bolts into blind holes on his spindles and it wasn't going to well, mumble, mumble.:baldy I will be removing mine from my new mower and making sure that some lube is on them. So many things are put together dry and it is a recipe for drama later on.:dirtdog
    #29
    Wodger63, Fearless Whetu and BergDonk like this.
  10. Big Willy

    Big Willy Gen. Italia

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    5,059
    Location:
    Sunshine Coast
    Mower bloke needs an angle grinder :-)
    Years ago I was selling a tool at the markets that I didn't know what it was.
    A customer showed interest and said it was for splitting steel nuts and asked how much it was.

    "I think I'll keep it" I said

    Doesn't compare to an angle grinder though :-)
    #30
    BergDonk and Boxa like this.
  11. GodSilla

    GodSilla I did that.

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12,958
    Location:
    GodSowncountry Australia
    Many torque settings for my bikes are specified for dry threads. There are specific dry-thread threadlockers and specific oily-thread threadlockers too. And the high-strength ones often get misused by home and professional mechanics on the wrong parts. :fpalm Dry threads are in common use on many things by design. A rattle-gun helps.:-)
    I pay a fair bit of attention to the details in my manuals regarding exactly which loctite to use on any given part, and owning a 640 Adventure it is necessary to use the stuff.
    Thread lubricant is occasionally required, like the 640 chain adjuster bolts that do a chemical thing and bond to the swingarm because the materials are different. Even then, using common copper anti-seize grease is the wrong fix, you need something with nickel in it. That took a bit of reading to discover.
    You should really research this stuff if you are having difficulties or intending to use a lot of it, there are caveats and traps for young players. I'm still learning as I go myself.:scratch
    #31
    Paul124ac and Boxa like this.
  12. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day. Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    8,159
    Location:
    Southern Illinois USA
    .....and exactly how would and angle grinder help in mower blokes situation ?
    #32
  13. Big Willy

    Big Willy Gen. Italia

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Oddometer:
    5,059
    Location:
    Sunshine Coast
    It'd be too awkward with a bench grinder.
    #33
    sages, Paul124ac and Woody2627 like this.
  14. Dee Cee

    Dee Cee Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2006
    Oddometer:
    614
    Location:
    Newlyn. Victoria.
    I too have a 640 Adv and a good manual with all the different thread lockers mentioned, some are old loctite part numbers and have been superseded.

    I have made up long taps and drills for fixing seized chain adjuster bolts in various swing arms, mine in my 640 have never seize on them and have given no trouble in 14 years and 100ks.

    During my time as a diesel fitter we always cleaned and oiled head bolts before torquing them down, a little under the head is a must to allow them to spin smoothly for the setting to be accurately reached.

    The many years I have spent pulling agricultural and earth moving gear apart has cemented my thoughts on lube on bolts. FWIW.
    #34
    GodSilla likes this.
  15. Scottyx

    Scottyx Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2017
    Oddometer:
    174
    Location:
    Sydney
    I went to put the nut back on the end of the crankshaft to hold the rotor in place and noticed the threads on the crank are a bit dicky. The nut tightened up a bit and then just spun as it's threaded.

    It's hard to see exactly what happened, but the nut appears to have a "heli coil" type thing inside it. When I took the nut off again the heli coil thing is sticking out past the end of the nut.

    I couldn't bring myself to look too hard at the crank so I pushed the bike into the corner and I'll think about it latter.
    #35
  16. Scottyx

    Scottyx Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2017
    Oddometer:
    174
    Location:
    Sydney
    37F1C15A-9888-42AE-A5D6-166B2CEE4699.jpeg
    #36
  17. GordyOZ

    GordyOZ Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2013
    Oddometer:
    786
    Location:
    Submarine Town
    looks like a single use locking nut, if so you will need a new one................. most clutch nuts and quite a few front sprocket retaining nuts are like that and for a very good reason
    #37
  18. GodSilla

    GodSilla I did that.

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12,958
    Location:
    GodSowncountry Australia
    That's bad news. Got a thread file?
    #38
  19. Roofchop

    Roofchop Hands up mother stickers, this is a f**k up!

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2016
    Oddometer:
    696
    Location:
    Carool, NSW
    Looks like its been repaired in the past with some type of thread insert.

    Might be able to save it, if you can unscrew the insert and refit it to the crank (with loctite!)

    Cheers
    Dave
    #39
  20. Boxa

    Boxa 2 Smoking Barrels

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2014
    Oddometer:
    756
    Location:
    SA Riverland.
    AFAIK the reason for some bolts stating that no lube be used is to get an accurate torque on the bolt.

    If lube is used they (the manufacturer) have no control of what is used as lube, a bit of oil out of your oil can if very different to molly grease and give a much different torque on a bolt.

    A lot of bolts are tightened to a rotation rather than torque taking out the friction of the bolt head out of the equasion.
    #40
    Big Willy and a2zworks like this.