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How do you guys and pals deal with maintenance costs overseas?

Discussion in 'Asia' started by Raul Pardo, May 27, 2020.

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  1. Raul Pardo

    Raul Pardo Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    24
    Location:
    Mexico
    Hello, I am in Turkey at the moment and I have to do the usual 5000km check for my Royal Enfield Himalayan. They want to charge me the half the cost of renting an apartment here, and I have the feeling I am being over charged, for some reason. Who makes half the rent in 30 mins?

    there is not much to do, just inspect this, adjust that and clean the air filter. There is not even the need for oil change right now.

    I am frustrated as I do not speak Turkish and they do not speak english. I do not even know that the know what has go be done, as the manual with the checklist is in english and it is available in other languages, but not in turkish.

    There is also no Honda or whatever other motorcycle shop in town, and I mean, there is not a single "official" shop of any brand at all. I only find the corner shop garages.

    any tips are welcome.
    #1
  2. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    I hear Van is full of Iranians nowadays - maybe ask in one of their restaurants for a recommendation.
    #2
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  3. Parcero

    Parcero Mundial Supporter

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    Location:
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    Without any knowledge about the rental market in Turkey, it’s hard to know if you are being overcharged (or undercharged) for the work down on your bike. I’m sure there is no correlation anyway, other than the general notion that in countries with lower costs of living bike repairs should cost less.

    I had routine maintenance done on my moto (a BMW R1200GS) and also replaced wear parts (tires, brake pads) in Colombia, Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia, and Argentina. A BMW dealer in Colombia did a 12,000-mile service, which included all fluid changes and valve adjustment, and the cost was slightly less than I would have paid in the U.S. I had tires that I brought down installed in Ecuador and the cost was substantially less than in the U.S. Another 12K service in Chile was about the same price as in the U.S. New tires (Metzeler Karoo 3s) plus installation in Bolivia cost half the price of the same tires/installation in the U.S. New tires in Argentina (Michelin Anakee 3s) plus installation cost nearly double due to heavy import tariffs in Argentina. Interestingly, a 6,000-mile service and repair of some broken parts there cost about a quarter of what a U.S. shop would have charged me.

    The cost of living in all of these countries varies widely, and my repair/service costs didn’t seem to follow. I knew approximately what things cost in the U.S. and hoped to be able to be under that, or well under, depending on the country but it didn’t always work out that way. I did use shops recommended by local friends who said they’d had good experiences and were fairly priced.

    In the end, I needed the service to be able to continue my trip and didn’t have many options. I didn’t like paying double for tires in Argentina, but had no options, and I made up for it with the half-prices tires in Bolivia. If you know any locals or can find recommendations for good shops on rider blogs or forums in countries you plan to visit, that would be my advice.
    #3
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  4. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    Do like I did, After my Norton came back from the local shop ,its 500 mile check, idling at 2000 rpms.
    Sit down with the bike, download dans motorcycle maintainence manual and any RE manuels you can, getting the basics for valve check etc.. after you determine what Needs to be done , have the tools. at a slow pace get to know your bike while taking in the culture.
    If you think you are being taken on costs it is a good motivation to learn what you will need to know throughout your travels. The suggestion to find another reliable shop is good but they wont have the clearances for the valves either. google RE turkey, dealer in istanbul. 90 216596 50 10
    #4
  5. Raul Pardo

    Raul Pardo Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    24
    Location:
    Mexico
    thank you. I do not have many options, there are just a handful of shops here, and none of them seems to me trust worthy. I wish I could do the service myself, but I have way too much (everything) to learn.
    #6
  6. Raul Pardo

    Raul Pardo Adventurer

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    May 24, 2020
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    Location:
    Mexico
    #7
  7. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

    Joined:
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    3,451
    Welcome to Advrider Raul

    If you are riding a Royal Enfield single and worrying about servicing costs it would make sense to take up a few wrenches and get your hands dirty.
    You asked about how to save money when having service work done and the answer is DIY. ( do it yourself)

    It reads as if this is your very first bike but you already know in detail the list of which items need to be looked at or may require a slight adjustment and you probably have a detailed operators manual containing more valuable instructions .


    Being marooned in Turkey you should have plenty of time to get familiar with basic maintenance . If you can get onto the internet , as now, then you should be able to access instructional videos about your RE bike maintenance .https://www.google.ca/search?q=Roya...work&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-ca&client=safari

    Knowing this stuff will be a treasure on the road if an actual mechanical problem comes up. One can’t do an adventure tour and also expect to have full garage services available for you to hand over the bike in every remote place on the planet and whenever a small problem shows up.

    The Royal Enfield single cylinder engines are of an old design and should be easy enough to work on for a beginner like yourself .It will be a good basic instruction course subject .Without a Royal Enfield dealership or parts supplier available any bike shop worker diving into it will probably be no better informed than you are now. :hmmmmmThey will probably first look up the video themselves and then bill you for the time .


    Old English bikes , which your single cylinder RE is , usually required frequent adjustment of the valve clearances , drive chain tension , clutch cable free play and oil change and a cleaning of an oil strainer or an actual filter to replace ( rare)

    All these items are straightforward and easy enough for a beginner with a set of wrenches. Old-days bikes usually came with all the tools ( some wrenches ,screw driver,feeler gauges) needed for doing this stuff and much, much more at roadside .


    Being your own mechanic for these simple tasks saves you cash and the worry of going beyond the recommended periods of use when not being able to locate a service garage .

    So , figure out what size wrenches you need and buy a basic set to carry with you. Buy a spare spark plug of the CORRECT type listed in your manual. Study up on how to service hydraulic disc brakes . Easy.

    But do NOT start messing around with the fuel injector or electronic ignition timing if your model has those .

    Your RE will still have the old fashioned adjustable screw and nut valve tappet adjusters , correct ? These are dead simple to understand and adjust .

    Any serious major mechanical failure on any bike will of course be beyond the scope of a roadside repair , but the regular “ inspection” and oil & filter change, chain adjustment, brake repair , tire repair / replacement and more should be within the ability of any adventure tourer on an RE.


    I do most maintenance on my bikes even when I travel - things like valve clearance changes on the BSA twin ( English, with overhead valves= ohv ), back 50 years ago , right up to the present when it comes time to do oil changes and valve clearance adjustments on my ohv BMW 1100gs, disc bake pad replacements . Tire replacement and puncture repair is the same for every bike.

    With the more complicated sohc and dohc multi cylinder engined bikes which use shims and with electronic ignition the adjustments take more skill,time and tools and are best left to experts or in my at-home workplace . The modern engine service needs are at much longer intervals so an occasional shop visit on tour is the better solution and money well spent.Fuel injectors should never require adjustments unless they get congested which requires a specialty injector service .


    When I travel I do an oil / filter change every 8000 to 10000km and that can be arranged as a do -it -myself job at any garage which is willing to sell me the oil and lend me a catch pan for the old oil and a work place out of the sun or the rain. For example in your home country Mexico where I love to travel most any small bike shop or oil change shop or automobile garage I ask will gladly let me do these things and charge only for the new oil. The same is true in most countries if you bother to ask .

    By the way , I looked at your first introductory post and will remark that you look better in the older photo . The more recent image with the big beard and bandana makes you look scary ,too much like a jihadi-sympathizer... or a Harley dude . :imaposer
    I bet that a Clean shave will be more hygienic and more comfortable .
    Have fun and I hope that your travel can quickly resume.
    #8
  8. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    #9
  9. Mark Manley

    Mark Manley Long timer

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    Location:
    Wessex, England
    I few years ago when I was travelling in Africa I was walking down the street with a couple of friends in Khartoum where most men are clean shaven or have a moustache and a local shouted across the road at my companion who was sporting a fairly long beard "hey look there's Osama Bin Laden", we all laughed somewhat nervously before moving on, my friend is Irish.
    #10
  10. Raul Pardo

    Raul Pardo Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 24, 2020
    Oddometer:
    24
    Location:
    Mexico
    Thanks for all the comments Sjoerd Bakker, and sorry for late replay.

    Update:

    - There is no Royal Enfield in Turkey.

    - Shop in Istanbul wants to sell me this kit, for 250USD. (just 40 pounds in the UK)

    ---> https://accessories.hitchcocksmotor...FyS2xXhnUZd6J74K7qGPQRyHr-yL977k5uLw7_rJ85d5E

    - Now I am waiting for the quote from the UK for the kit and some other parts which I plan to order and do the 10,000 km service in a nice shop I find in Ankara.

    - This is my first motorbike, I am on the road, no roof to work or time to learn on my own. I can and I will learn and do the maintenance later. This time I hope I can watch and learn. Problem is the mechanics do not speak any english so we can't really communicate. With the owner is ok (with google translate) but the mechanics have no time or energy for that, I understand them.

    - I shave!! https://www.instagram.com/p/CBp0nEUHrrV/

    I will follow with trip updates when it gets a bit exciting. So far I just move 1200km from Van to Ankara to extend the residence permit and get upgrades to my gear, but no real fun travel since.

    Good travels and stay safe!



    - Profile pic.jpg



    haha, This is my very first bike, and somehow I excuse myself fro
    #11