How I fixed the slow leak on my Tubliss

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by _CJ, Mar 18, 2019.

  1. _CJ

    _CJ Rugged Individualist

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    Ever since installing my new tires and Tubliss system, I've had a slow leak on the low pressure side of the rear tire. It held air fine for the duration of a ride, but would lose about half it's pressure every night until zeroing out. I gave it some time, hoping it would heal itself, but it didn't.

    Not wanting to repeat the entire installation process (as suggested by the Tubliss trouble shooting guide), I removed the valve core from the low pressure side, squirted about ten pumps of soapy water from a spray bottle into it, reinstalled the valve core, aired up the tire, and voilla! no more leak! Even two days later, it hasn't lost any pressure.




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  2. Aviatordoc

    Aviatordoc BMW R1200 GSA LC and S1000XR rider Supporter

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    You should a tried Stans sealant. Great stuff.
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  3. _CJ

    _CJ Rugged Individualist

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    My understanding is that if you want to use a sealant, it has to be used from the start instead of soapy water. Once the soapy water is used as part of the installation, you're married to it.



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  4. P 0 P E Y E

    P 0 P E Y E Bald rider Supporter

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    I’ve been Running Tuubless since God was in diapers. With wonderful success.

    The valve core needs to be re-tightened after the first couple of rides. Then checked occasionally for tightness.
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  5. noyolk

    noyolk Certified Preowned

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    Just be careful, I damaged the valve core and could not remove it as the tangs broke. Call to tubliss and they do not sell the stem, only a new liner with stem. Was able to save it with a left hand drill bit removing the core without damage to the stem.
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  6. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    dirty valve stem will do that
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  7. nzrian

    nzrian renegade master Supporter

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    My tubliss system on the rear leaked around the rim to tire interface on both sides of the rim with a motoz arena hybrid.
    Apparently the motoz bead width isn't as thick as most tires, so this is a known problem.
    I fixed it by removing the valve core on the low pressure side and squeezing in some slime tire sealant, without removing the tire.
    Fixed it up good as gold.
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  8. _CJ

    _CJ Rugged Individualist

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    Interesting, mine is a Motoz tire too.


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  9. nzrian

    nzrian renegade master Supporter

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    Try it, you get some puncture protection as well.
    I see you have it sorted anyway.
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  10. nk14zp

    nk14zp Long timer

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    I like to add a burst of air to the tire after getting it up to pressure to clean the valve. Got in that habit working on semis with equal in the tires.
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  11. ohgood

    ohgood Just givver tha berries !!!

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    equal in the tires? for balancing?
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  12. nk14zp

    nk14zp Long timer

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  13. _CJ

    _CJ Rugged Individualist

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    On the topic of balancing.......I was getting a cyclical vibration at 35+mph that kind of smoothed out above 55mph. The vibration would build for a couple of seconds, then tapper off and disappear for a couple of seconds, then come back. It had me puzzled because it seemed like a tire balance issue would be constant. Long story short, I removed the wheels and did a home balance job with some lead sinkers that cost me $3.00. Wrapped them in electrical tape and zip tied the ends of the tape to keep it from unraveling. Ended up with 5oz of weight on each wheel just about opposite of the low pressure rim lock thing. It's not pretty, but it works. Took it for a test ride, and it's smooth as glass.

    My theory with the cycling of the vibration is that it was because the wheels are different diameters, and when they synced up the vibration would be most intense, then when they were 180 degrees out, they would kind of cancel each other out.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]




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  14. worncog

    worncog YBNormal Supporter

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    Stans is good stuff. Raced mtn bikes for a few years when tubeless was in its infancy. Used Stans rims and latex compound with great results. Not a hiccup in the last two years of using Stans in the enduro tires.

    I use Stans to lube the bead when mounting and install the bulk amount thru the valve stem. Getting ready to mount a new rear tire on the DR and will be using Stans in the tube for extra security.
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  15. _CJ

    _CJ Rugged Individualist

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    yeah, some people swear by the sealant. Doesn't mix with soap/water though, and that's what I used when I installed the tires. Plus, it's one more thing to buy vs. mixing up dish soap and water that I already have on hand. We'll see if my opinion changes after a puncture. :lol3



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  16. tomrux

    tomrux Been here awhile

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    Dish soap can be pretty destructive on a rim tho. The reason I wont use it as lubricant when mounting tyres. Find a quick squirt of cheaparse cooking spray works atreat and after the first wash leaves no residue.

    Cheers Tom R
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  17. _CJ

    _CJ Rugged Individualist

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    Soap destructive to the rim? How so? It IS tubliss's recommended method of installation. Hard to believe they'd recommend something that's going to damage the rim.



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  18. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    IMO sealant is the way to go for tubliss. I've run Stans forever on Tubliss setups and it seals up great and also helps a lot should you get a puncture.
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  19. tomrux

    tomrux Been here awhile

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    Washes any oil of the rim and leaves a corrosive film behind. Too much caustic in dish soap. Shouldn't use it to wash a bike generaly either. Use a mild soap if you must.

    Cheers Tom R
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  20. teambft

    teambft teambft

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    So wanted to clarify - if I used soapy water to initially install my Tubliss, I cannot now use Stans as a sealant?
    #20