How to make your own Carbon Fiber/Kevlar Bash plate....

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by ebrabaek, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. runnin4melife

    runnin4melife Been here awhile

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    Come to the dark side of chopped exhausts! Also if you are going to chop/weld the stock exhaust which works famously, perhaps the talented gent could fix the arrow exhaust too. Just chop right before the dent and some talented folks could fix the dent and re weld that too. :evil
  2. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Yeppers..... Dark side. On top of this, the top of the Arrow headers are touching the oil pan. There is no way to adjust this. I will say that never again will I purchase any Arrow product. It is cheap, poorly fitted, and ehhhhhh.... Poorly jigged. As soon as I can find someone to weld my stocker, it's ottahere. The dent is miniscule, and has no effect on performance.
  3. Loutre

    Loutre Cosmopolitan Adv Super Moderator

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    :happaySo happy this thread is back
    But god damn what did arrow think with their design?:becca This is supposed to be a dual sport and not a race bike.
  4. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    I know right...... They had their head up their a$$ when they designed this header. :huh
  5. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Alright.... stage two.
    First a ramp was designed to hold the now straight bracket, in stead of the S type old bracket.
    [​IMG]


    On the guard....
    [​IMG]


    Final angle adjust.....
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Then 15 layers of 6 oz 6K 2x2 twill was laid up.....
    [​IMG]


    This time I am taking it to 300 deg for a few hrs, to achieve max potential....
    [​IMG]


    Note the 4 layers of 6 oz 3k 2x2 on the inside @ ground zero.....
    [​IMG]



    This whole latter part of this thread really illustrate how well composites works, and can be fixed....altered....etc. I can assure you that you would have been throwing an aluminum guard away at this point,as it would have sheared. That of course could be fixed with hammering, and welding.....but at a higher by a good margin....cost. I think that the engine would still have been ok..... I think, but the headers would have been toast, as aluminum does not distribute pressure very well. It tends to deflect in the area of impact, as we have seen some inmates replacing their oil pan after a good hit. That is still not bad though.
    This will now cure a few hrs, and then onward to the outside.
  6. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Then on to the bottom. Extra armor. 10 layers of 6oz 6K 2x2 twill.
    [​IMG]


    It looks like the guard has seen a bit of use. Note the "CAT" area.....
    [​IMG]


    Then after rough sanding.......
    [​IMG]


    Fitting tomorrow.
  7. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Slowly ground off the bracket to make a good fit.....
    [​IMG]


    Then trimmed the inside, and prepped for another piece to be bonded to the inside....
    [​IMG]


    Piece bonded to the inside, and hole drilled.....
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Then fit checks out great....
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    I am waiting on some 12 oz 12K 2x2 twill...... Notice the outside has been sanded..... Can you say.... Carbondillo.....:clap:freaky:lol3:lol3
  8. murph76

    murph76 Been here awhile

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    hey erling....is the bike lighter with all these carbon fiber mods or are u braking even with to many layers to hold strength?
  9. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    I am getting around 60% of an equivalent aluminum build..... Not at fault of the composites, but as I am not vacuum bagging, I can never reach the strength of such. I just add a layer or two of CF. Normally I would be at about 30% of alu. equivalent, so the bike will always be lighter with this, than with alu. or steel. Like the luggage cases. If memory serves me correct, they came in at just about 3-4 pounds each..... So still lighter, but not as light, as it could be, but lighter , and stronger by far as compared to alu. I have no doubts this would have taken out the oil pan, if it was a 5-6mm alu bash guard.
  10. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Soooo... I finally got a chance to put two layers of Panzer Cloth on the bash guard. Two layers of 12K 12oz 2x2 twill. This is why. I am always trying to circumnavigate vacuum bagging. Simply because of time, and mess involved. I will not argue that vacuum'ing it would make for a stronger matrix. Hands down. As I am still in prepping for my all mountain bike front triangle..... it will be bagged. I simply try to work it without. I am not adding for strength here, but as you will see with high temp/strength epoxy's.... They are extremely hard, making for a very stiff layup, but the one thing is abrasive resistance. It does not have that. So I mixed two types of polymers..... High temp, and low temp epoxy ( MAX HTE+1618) This way I now have two outer armadillo layers...:D:D with a flex bonding..... It increased the weight I would say 10%, but I am thinking that that combo will prevent a lot of the abrasive wear from road debris. The other solution, of course, would be an outer layer of Kevlar, but I don't wanna look at a yellow, orange, blue....etc.... guard.....
    So here it is with rough sanding done, and the rub completed......
    [​IMG]


    Next it a layer of clear coat.....
  11. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Two layers of clear coat, now drying...
    [​IMG]
  12. Ms. Nashville

    Ms. Nashville Been here awhile

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    You really want to armor a tank, dont you? :huh

    Keep up the good work. I read EVERY thread of yours!
    Always gives me new ideas what to work on next :evil

    Greetings,
    Martina
  13. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Thanks Matti..... It is great to see that you enjoy the posts......:clap:freaky:freaky
  14. MaxThePanda

    MaxThePanda Psycho Panda

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    Hi Erling

    Been reading your threads, and particularly this one, with interest. I am riding an amateur rallye raid in South Africa in November http://amageza.com and am turning my thoughts to getting my bike set up properly.

    I have a KTM 690R with an auxiliary rear tank, but that's not enough fuel. My current plan is to put on a pair of roto-moulded polyethylene tanks from http://www.rally-raidproducts.co.uk and then make my own nav support and fairing to go with them (the rand is very weak against the pound haha).

    I've been thinking... instead of aluminium for the fairing/nav frame, it looks like a carbon/kevlar combo would be well up to the job, from what I've read here. My main question - how would it handle vibration, as that is the main enemy of these frames? With a kilogram or two of roadbook/ICO etc. mounted high up, there is a bit of torsional twist on the frame. And that's not to mention the impact in an off, which I'm certain to have. In my experience with my current fairing, ordinary glassfibre is pretty poor in this situation! I did see KTM's latest rally bike was using a carbon composite fairing frame - I don't see why my backyard version shouldn't also!

    And the second question is regarding the fairing panels themselves. What combination of carbon/kevlar (number of sheets, in what order - perhaps one of each?) would be good for that? Since it's high up and out front the challenge is to keep weight as low as possible. I'd rather under engineer it and make a couple from my mould in case I fell and broke one, rather than over engineer it and make it too heavy.

    And lastly, for complex shapes, is there any disadvantage to using smaller pieces cut and overlapped, or does one really need one sheet covering the whole area?

    I've never worked with carbon or kevlar before, but I am up for a challenge, and it looks like a wonderful project to get stuck into.

    Thanks for your fascinating thread!
    cheers
    Ian
  15. mtbbker

    mtbbker MtbBiker

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    Ian
    There is a thread here on ADV about navi towers (they debated composites:evil). Have a look here http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=684282
    Then book at AMTComposites one of their courses on composites, I think they have a branch in Slaapstad. Speak to Evan at HO in Johannesburg. Once you start making components with composites, a whole new world awakens:rofl
  16. MaxThePanda

    MaxThePanda Psycho Panda

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    Thanks - checked them out. Looks interesting... you into this yourself? cheers, Ian
  17. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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    Hi Ian.
    I will admit, I haven't got a clue about the construction of these towers. I have seen a few, but never actually paid much attention to one. I will start by answering a few of your questions. Vibrations, you are correct is an enemy to fiberglass, or glassfiber as you mentioned. There are a couple of reasons for this. First is the resin primarily used with fiberglass, is polyester. When cured, it is so hard that it is almost brittle. A way to compare this to say modern day epoxys, would be to pour a little puddle, say 5 cm in diameter. Pour one with an average polyester, and one with an average epoxy. Try to ply it, and you will find the polyester stiffer, the epoxy more pliable. Then take a nail and a small hammer, and gently tap it in the middle, and observe the tendency of the polyester to crack like a spiderweb, very quick, and the epoxy resist that. Second. The fibers in fiberglass are primarily made from a glass matrix, which is more brittle as compared to carbon or Kevlar. So to your question. No.... Carbon/Kevlar will with stand vibrations just fine, as long as it is dimentioned, and designed correctly. But herein lies the beauty of the composites. You can add strength in mounting areas, to make them strong, and go thinner in non critical areas as to save weight. As a general rule of thumb, a proper composite layup will weigh about 30% of an aluminum. That is very general, and that weight loss can quickly be nullified by the overuse of resin. It would be quite a complex part to manufacture, specially as a first dab...:D but certainly a doable thing. Rather than discuss the specifics in this thread, I would like for you either to go through my FB page, or start a thread in the 690 section, and I will be more than happy to help you along. I am game....:clap:freaky
  18. mtbbker

    mtbbker MtbBiker

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    Yip, search on wilddogs for my Meerkat project:D
  19. OKstripe

    OKstripe Adventurer

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    Just saw for the first time. This is even cooler than the carbon fiber rear rack!:nod
  20. ebrabaek

    ebrabaek Long timer

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