How to Re-key Givi Trekker to BMW Key

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by kevin g, Feb 18, 2017.

  1. kevin g

    kevin g Been here awhile

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    When I got my Givi Outback Trekker top box I was intrigued by how similar the key is to my 2011 GSA. I got the Trekker top box because I like the mount system that Altrider offers for the cargo platform I have; I can mount the box all the way aft or the passenger seat location. I have the BMW panniers and would like to have just one key.

    After removing the lock from the Trekker and recalling what the BMW locks look like I figured the Givi lock could be modified to use the BMW key. It can be; and here is how to do it.

    First, I ordered a lock set from Revzilla, I did not want to be without the lock on my case in case it did not work. The Givi part number is SL101, it is $19. Here is a comparison of the two locks and keys. Givi on top and BMW bottom.
    [​IMG]
    The BMW key is about 0.025" wider and just a bit shorter.
    The first thing to do is remove all of the tumblers and the tiny springs that go with them. They can be pulled out from their wide side with small pliers or pushed out from the narrow side.
    [​IMG]
    Notice that the first plate at the front is not a tumbler held in with a spring. It is a shield that allows only the right key type to enter. It is a little too narrow for the BMW key.
    [​IMG]
    Use a square jewelers file to make the shield plate a bit wider to fit the BMW key.
    [​IMG]
    The next step is to file the lock assembly a little wider so that the BMW key will fit. There is a spring loaded trap door at the front of the lock and I wanted to keep it out of the way of the square jewelers file so that it did not get filed along with the lock internals.
    [​IMG]
    In the end I put some masking tape on the two faces of the file that were orthogonal to the surfaces that need filing and this kept the trap door from getting filed. Each of the ribs that you see must be filed a bit to allow the BMW key to fit. There are ribs on both sides that must be filed.
    [​IMG]
    The metal is soft and files easily. After filing there may be some small burrs at the edges of the ribs that should be removed with an X-Acto blade. Here is the lock after widening for the BMW key. Finally, blow, or rinse out, any filings in the lock body.
    [​IMG]
    The next step is to find the correct order of the tumblers to allow the lock to operate. This type of lock pulls the tumblers in to be flush with the lock body to turn the key. There is probably a method to figure out what tumbler to use where, I used trial and error. Here is the lock with the first three tumblers fit. Notice the shield at the top of the photo. As you fit each tumbler you must test to see that the lock will turn before moving to the next. Notice that some tumblers have the inside tab on the same side as the outside tab that rides on the spring; others have the inside tab on the opposite side.
    [​IMG]
    I was able to find a tumbler that fit for 7 of the 9 positions after some trial and error. The last two tumblers turned with a little drag and I noticed that with the key inserted there was movement of the tumbler only in one direction, the others had a little free play in both directions. I used the file open the bottom of the tumbler on one and reduce the tang on the other and they turned freely.
    [​IMG]
    The end result is that all of the tumblers could be used. If not all of the tumblers could be made to work it should be no problem to leave a few out. Be careful with the tiny springs. If you lose any they are the same as the BMW lock and your dealer probably has about a million of them from all of the lock sets keyed over the years, mine does. Unfortunately, the BMW tumblers are thicker than the Givi tumblers so they cannot be used, unless one has the patience to thin them. There are only 3 different tumblers for the BMW lock but the Givi lock seems to have 6 different tumblers.

    After fitting all of the tumblers I shot some spray white lithium grease in the whole thing and exercised the lock a bit. I installed the modified lock in the top box and it works perfectly. It is really nice to have a common key for everything on the bike.
    #1
  2. JimVonBaden

    JimVonBaden "Cool" Aid! Supporter

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    Nicely done! :thumb
    #2
  3. KiwiKurt

    KiwiKurt Amor Patriae

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    nice! well done!
    #3
  4. The Opa

    The Opa experienced

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    Impressive!
    #4
  5. Daleah

    Daleah Been here awhile

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    cool!!
    #5
  6. GS Addict

    GS Addict Pepperfool

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    :thumb
    #6
  7. ALJR

    ALJR Adventurer

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    Very impressive ingenuity. You've got a lot of patience. Thanks for sharing.
    #7
  8. dyg

    dyg dyg it

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    Great idea and thorough pictorial! Afraid I do not have the patience or eyesight that you do. How long did it take you?
    #8
  9. kevin g

    kevin g Been here awhile

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    It took less than an hour to figure out the approach and file the lock cylinder to fit the key. In another ~20 minutes I had most of the tumblers fitted and a working lock. Because I am an engineer and cannot always control myself I spent another hour trying different arrangements of tumblers to see if there was a better combination. I use an Optivisor for close work so i can see the fine stuff.

    I could probably do the whole thing in an hour now. Gee, I have a spare lock now so maybe I feel a challenge coming on...
    #9
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  10. YakSpout

    YakSpout Obstacle Allusion Supporter

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    Thanks for this! I re-keyed my V47 to my BMW key and it's not perfect, but it's WAY better than carrying (and potentially losing) 2 keys.

    A couple wiggles and it'll rotate properly.
    #10
  11. kevin g

    kevin g Been here awhile

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    If you take the cylinder out and check that none of the tumblers sit above the cylinder that should eliminate the need to wiggle. Each tumbler should be flush or if slightly proud have a little travel against the spring force so that they will go flush. Not all of the tumblers are required so if one or two are hanging up you can just omit them.
    #11
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  12. hammick

    hammick Long timer

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    Nice!
    #12
  13. AZgman

    AZgman Addicted to curves

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    Thanks for the post, I was able to re-key one of my Givi Trekker bags today so I don't have to carry two separate keys. "Someone" ordered two separate bags rather than a set (which would have had the same lock setup on both bags)!
    #13
  14. ninerone9

    ninerone9 n00b

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    Thank you for the post! Worked brilliantly for my '09 F800GS key into my Givi Trekker Outback box! Now I don't have a givi key bouncing around on top of my faux tank while I ride! Couple of notes: 1. Harbor freight for the set of needle files ($3.99). 2. My BMW key would not reach the last tumbler so I left it out. 3. The second to last tumbler was sticking out a little too much, so I filed it down just a touch. 4. I used a tiny flat screwdriver to pry out the tabs that hold the front face onto the core. Inside are 2 springs and the plastic "doors". These come right out giving full and easy access to filing out the lock core. Reassembled the face fine with a small punch and hammer. 5. Didn't even have to open up the SL101 kit, though it was nice knowing I had the extra springs and parts from the kit handy. 6. Pay attention when re-installing the core; there is one correct way. Cheers.
    18738428_10213154957732559_4222314806573156406_o.jpg
    #14
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  15. Geneva2001

    Geneva2001 n00b

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    #15
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  16. Geneva2001

    Geneva2001 n00b

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    Want to say a big thank you. tore apart my Givi Trekker 58 and rekeyed it with 8 out of the nine pins. Works like a charm, couldn't have done it without your help! Took me not more than an hour.
    #16
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  17. Menoche

    Menoche Been here awhile

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    Same here, at last, only one key :) thanks!!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    #17
  18. Daleah

    Daleah Been here awhile

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    I'm putting this on the list for winter projects.
    #18
  19. Fast Idle

    Fast Idle Since the Sixties Supporter

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    Thanks a bunch kevin g. I met you at D2D in Dawson and you suggested this for my KTM. It works great! Only one key, yahoo!
    #19
  20. TrentAJ

    TrentAJ I'm bringing ugly back Supporter

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    Thanks for posting this detailed walk-through. I rekeyed my Trekker Outback 58L in less than an hour. One key for the entire bike.
    -Trent
    #20