How to trailer a GS, or any bike for that matter?

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by alain173, May 26, 2008.

  1. alain173

    alain173 Adventurer

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    What's the best way to tie down an r1150gs to a trailer? I've never trailered a bike. Should I place it on its bike stand and tie the handlebars down? or leave it on its own tires and tie down the handlebars and rear wheels? I've got to trailer the bike tomorrow and not sure how to do it. Thanks in advance
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  2. Boatman

    Boatman Membership has it's privileges ;-) Supporter

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    I use 2 straps on the handle bars as close to the triple clamp as possible going forward and to the sides. Then I strap the rear tire down. Compress the forks enough so that on rough roads the suspension won't compress enough to loosen the straps. Bike verticle and no side stand. Also if not using a chock for the front wheel, it's a good idea to secure the front wheel from moving/turning side to side.
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  3. mrmaico

    mrmaico Long timer

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  4. Ol' Badger

    Ol' Badger Adventurer

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  5. syzygy

    syzygy Guest

    If you have a wood deck on the trailer, nail or screw down a length of 2x4 up against the front tire on both sides to eliminate the chance of the front end sliding out sideways.

    -kevin
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  6. rdwalker

    rdwalker Long timer Supporter

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    Alain: this is indeed the correct procedure. As other suggested, use a wheel chock (best) or at least some form of wheel block.

    In a nutshell: the most important thing is to fasten/immobilize front wheel against chock/block. As shown in the BMW document - straps on front wheel (above fender) hold it tight.

    The rear should be held lightly, only to prevent bouncing on bumbs.

    Do Not: strap by handle bars. You run a chance of busting them. Compresing the front slightly (by strapping near triple clamp, as suggested by Boatman) is permissible but unneeded if the front wheel is tight. Make sure not to compress front or rear shocks more than just very light - they are not designed to stay in compression for prolonged periods and you may blow out the seals. I did that on my KLR, I know.

    The method shown in the A&S link to BMW document works for me, I have transported my K'RS that way; nowadays, if my big 'LT or the 'GS go for a ride, that is how they are strapped.

    Good luck!
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  7. jpalamar

    jpalamar Long timer

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    Don't waste your money on tie-downs with the HOOKS on the end. They are a major PITA in that you can not sometimes cinch them down enough. Get the ratchet tie-downs that have NO HOOKS and just loop thru; that is, one continuous length that is attached to one end of the ratchet and the other end feeds thru the ratchet.

    They are, I believe called 'endless loop' tie-downs.

    [​IMG]

    Also, Wal*Mart among others sells some cheap seat-belt lambs wool chafing avoidance pads, about 2 bucks that make not scratching/chafing your painted surfaces an easy way to protect.
    #7
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  8. Xeraux

    Xeraux Archvillain

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    Edit: Whoops. I didn't see the A&S link was already posted.

    I wouldn't use a ratchet strap. If you get over-zealous with a ratchet, you can bend a frame or something.

    Use a good cam-lock/tension strap and tie off the ends.

    I have a set of ANCRA "Classic" tiedowns. They incorporate a soft hook into the tiedown. It's kind of the best of both worlds.

    [​IMG]
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  9. nickatnite

    nickatnite Poster Boy for Red Death

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    The A&S link is the way to go.

    When I bought my GS back in 06, that is the way the dealer showed me to tie it down. He even threw in a set of double loops for my tie downs for the forks.

    You might not think the GS will stay there, but it will. I towed mine over 700 miles home from the dealer that way.
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  10. jpalamar

    jpalamar Long timer

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    I couldn't disagree with you more. Obviously you are correct in that you don't want to cinch down that tightly, but c'mon, unless you are an idiot who would cinch down to bend something especially if you are at the correct spots. If you are at the correct tie-down points BMW uses the strap you show and they are junk IMO and instill not much confidence; HD uses ratchet/endless loop and they are great. (I have an HD buddy) that can getl all I want.

    I'm enough of a fanatic that I use 4 (four) for the front wheel/forks (2 each side) and two in the back (pulling forward) as well. Extra effort, but bikes expensiive, peace of mind, cheap! Likely in this thread, never, ever, on handlebars! And of course the key is centering bike so there is neutral stress!
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  11. Xeraux

    Xeraux Archvillain

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    I'm not going to take the chance of being that idiot. I can compress the suspension with the cam-lock and never have to worry about whether or not I've overtightened. It eliminates one more worry.
    #11
  12. Whiskey Tango

    Whiskey Tango 1*

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    Ol'Badger's link is correct.

    Havinf hauled bikes back and forth between NJ and Daytona for year in a 42' Gooseneck I can tell you that pulling forward and down and out is correct. I use four straps on the front and two on the back. I use M&R Straps with the soft-ties sewn into the affair as well as a substantial collection of soft-ties in addition thereto.

    The rears are not as critical but you have to keep the hind quarters form dancing about. Careful of brake lines, wires and the like. Check the straps after fifty miles, put a click or two where needed and then you are usually good to go; or G2G as I like to say.:D :1drink
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  13. Gezerbike

    Gezerbike I'm Baaaaaaaaaaaaaa......ck

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    The A & S site hits the nail on the head. And I personly don't like the ratchet straps either...you don't need that type of hold down power. I share a trailer with a friend, and we have bought two of the Condor chocks. They make loading even easier, especially for one person....simply roll the bike onto the trailer, up onto the chock, it " flips " up, holding the bike upright....now you simply walk around the four corners tieing down, starting on the front. Reverse the whole operation in taking it off...again, a one person operation.

    http://www.revver.com/video/591782/...orcycle-stand-demonstration-duncanmoto-video/
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  14. ridgeback

    ridgeback CH

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    If you are using hooks and you hit a hard enough bump then the hooks can pop out (if the bike compresses more during the bump then you have it compressed with the tie downs). On the front tie downs, attach a bungee to both top and bottom hook eyelets. Spiral the bungee around the tie down and it will also keep the loose tail of the tie down from flapping about.

    To keep the front forks from compressing too much but still get a good tie down, cut a 2x4 two to three inches shorter than the distance from the top of the tire to the bottom of the front fender directly between the forks (with the bike sitting normal). When you sinch the tie downs, place the 2x4 between the top of the wheel and the fender. You have to make sure the board stays lined up because if it comes out then you won't have much holding the front of the bike down anymore.
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  15. DaFoole

    DaFoole Well Marbled... Supporter

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    Get a hold of Flug......he's REALLY good at this.....:lol3
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