Husqvarna 701 Super Moto and Enduro!

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Dozer720, Aug 13, 2015.

  1. zoink

    zoink Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    398
    Location:
    SW VA
    Honestly if you're newer I think you'd be happy with either.

    I've owned a couple DRZs, on my 2nd 701, and also currently have a DR650 (which is for sale :)). I'm constantly on the fence, mostly from a cost/value perspective about which one I should keep for the long haul. 701 is winning, but really you can't go wrong with any of them functionally. Just boils down to what you like most in what each bike has to offer. Happy to offer any insight I can if you have more questions.

    The best thing you can do if you're worried about skill development, is go take some classes from the pros. I waited way to long to do that and I suffered a lot from developing bad habits, as well as transferring a lot of street habits (that were also probably not properly developed) over to the dirt.
  2. hardhat

    hardhat Been here awhile Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Oddometer:
    431
    Location:
    Las Vegas
    My experiemce w my 2018, most GOOD locksmiths will have q suitable blank and can cut the key in 5 min.
    cookieGB likes this.
  3. Foo Bar

    Foo Bar Semper Fi Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2017
    Oddometer:
    129
    Location:
    Somewhere Between Space and Time
    No [serious] complaints at all with my 701, which is my first off-road ride after riding street for a few decades. If I didn't have a 701, I'd only consider a plated KTM 500 or Husky 501 if you're doing off-road more than 80% of the time or well under 6' tall. Those smaller bikes are more capable off-road, lighter, plated for access to more land, and still are okay, but not as good, as a 701 on the street/highway.

    I'm 6'2" and don't plan to leave my 701 anytime soon, while my shorter riding buddy had a 690, but is now much happier on a 500 EXC. But based on your type of riding, a 701 sounds like a better fit to me. I wouldn't want to speak to other brands, but if you can spend for the Husky, I doubt you'd regret it.

    Buying tip if you're buying new: The Dealer activates the electronics in the bike after sale to the new owner. I purchased my 701 new, several states away, and had shipped to my door. Even with shipping, I saved thousands over the dealer prices in my state. You will still likely pay state tax; in fact, I paid state tax in the purchasing state, but the small difference in my state.
  4. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2020
    Oddometer:
    229
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    Other considerations with the 500 would be a shorter oil change interval and weaker stator. For ADV riding, I really like being able to charge my phone, run a GPS, and run aux lights and heated gear all at the same time if I need to.
  5. Foo Bar

    Foo Bar Semper Fi Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2017
    Oddometer:
    129
    Location:
    Somewhere Between Space and Time
    Adam Riemann and RTW Paul have no trouble with global travel on these smaller 500cc bikes, so those considerations can be solved.
    greasyfatman likes this.
  6. rsteiger

    rsteiger Bob Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,626
    Location:
    Hotlanta Area
    The power draw to charge cell phone and run a GPS is pretty small and should not be a problem. If the AUX light are LED then again there should not be too much of a concern especially if you replace the headlight with one of those aftermarket LED setups.

    The big issues start to happen with you are trying to run heated grips, jacket, and pants... those things tend to need a lot of juice.
  7. Norty01

    Norty01 Occupant

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2014
    Oddometer:
    3,341
    Location:
    CARLSBAD, CA, USA
    Before you buy a bike, take an OFF-ROAD motorcycle course. Raw-Hyde or something similar. Then, make a more informed decision regarding buying.
    srv256ss, KiwiPewe and WSobchak like this.
  8. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2020
    Oddometer:
    229
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    Here’s the math I did to be sure I knew the limits. All these are max draw (brights on, heated gear on full, etc).

    3A cell phone holder
    4A heated grips
    2A Voyager Pro
    8A jacket liner
    3A heated gloves
    1A USB port
    5A headlight
    7A aux lights

    Total 33A = 396W

    I don’t know why stator output stats are so hard to find, but Baja Designs lists max output for the 2017 EXC 500 at 195 watts. EDIT: the 2020 690 owner’s manual lists a capacity of 300W.

    Anyway, I totally agree that the 500 is the right ADV bike for some folks. I just like the extra peace of mind and convenience of the bigger bike.
  9. WSobchak

    WSobchak Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,314
    Location:
    North Central Washington
    I guess I’m in the minority here, but I suggest that you start on a small light weight bike and work your way up.

    I grew up riding crappy dirt bikes in orchards and hay fields. Got a street bike when I got out of the army and after a few years started getting back into dirt.

    YZ125 to DR350 to XR650L to 690 to a 950 Super Enduro and now on a 701. No doubt, they’re great bikes. But there is a lot of value in riding smaller bikes on more difficult terrain and then working you way up in terms of horsepower and weight. You learn so much on small bikes that is very difficult to learn on bigger bikes.

    I could hop logs on the 950 and ride more difficult trails and then when it comes to dirt roads you’re just in you comfort zone enjoying the flow. But those skills are best built on smaller bikes.

    I’ve been riding a trials bike more than the 701 this year to focus on slow speed balance over rocks/obstacles and getting more clutch control for wheelies. Not because I enjoy the trials bike but because I want to be a better rider on the 701.

    My 2 cents

    sincerely,

    Some random dude on the internet
    roookie1, Norty01, Riel and 1 other person like this.
  10. jonz

    jonz Miles are my mantra Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Oddometer:
    5,998
    Location:
    CA dez (it's a dry heat)/West Yellowstone,MT
    You don't enjoy the trials bike??? I've had a blast on the trials motorcycles I got to ride. So much so, I bought a trials bicycle.
  11. WSobchak

    WSobchak Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,314
    Location:
    North Central Washington
    I do enjoy the trials bike, but to be honest I like to get out and cover some country on the 701, my favorite riding is fast 2 track. The trials bike is fun but not as much as the 701.
  12. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2020
    Oddometer:
    229
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    I rode MTB trials and have been thinking about getting into moto trials for the same reasons as you. Do you find it transfers over well to a bigger bike?
  13. Salzig

    Salzig Comfortably dumb

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,001
    Location:
    Cremona, Italy
    My owner manual (2018 701E) says 300W.
    Section 22-Technical data, subsection 22.1-Engine.
    Foo Bar and smackyface like this.
  14. smdub

    smdub Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2017
    Oddometer:
    458
    Location:
    Maryland
    YES! I picked up dirt bikes late in life. Riding w/ guys half my age who had done it since youth. I bought a trials bike and took the class at the Trials Training Center. Helped ENORMOUSLY! The 701 is less nimble than, say, my 150 or 500 but look what Pol Tarres and the other trials guys can do on the big bikes. Pol finished the Romaniacs bronze class this year on a freakin' T7. I think those skills had to help immensely.
    WSobchak likes this.
  15. WSobchak

    WSobchak Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,314
    Location:
    North Central Washington
    Yeah they do. Slow speed balance, clutch control, log hops, finding the balance point on long wheelie etc all transfer. It’s just you have to get your body weight and timing right on the bigger bikes and you can get away with some more slop on the smaller bikes.

    Getting on the 701 after riding the trials bike makes it feel like you have to exaggerate your body position but the mechanics are the same.
    smackyface likes this.
  16. mjskier

    mjskier Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    853
    Location:
    Colorado
    Alternate source for the Rottweiler filter?
    I don't see a listing for just the filter on their site. Just the full kit.
    smackyface likes this.
  17. zoink

    zoink Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    398
    Location:
    SW VA
  18. mjskier

    mjskier Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    853
    Location:
    Colorado
    Thank you. Obviously my searching skills need some improvements
  19. smackyface

    smackyface Boldly going wherever Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2020
    Oddometer:
    229
    Location:
    Albuquerque, NM
    Good find, thanks! Confirmed 300W for the 2020 690 as well, once I knew where to look.
  20. zoink

    zoink Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2012
    Oddometer:
    398
    Location:
    SW VA
    What are my options for front axle sliders? I bought some like this where the closed nut on the one side of the axle comes with a replacement, but I didn't even pay attention that the other side is also not hollow. Would prefer not to drill. I found posts of people with sliders of this type installed, but they don't mention anything specific.