Husqvarna FE501S & FE350S

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by trailrider383, Sep 11, 2014.

  1. Fast1

    Fast1 Twisted Throttle

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    Is the Power Commander V only able to adjust fuel metering or is it also capable of timing advance?
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  2. MCoupe99

    MCoupe99 Adventurer

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    Lol, got a little mud on the bike today, took it out on FR57 outside of North Bend. With the fueling/exhaust changes its easier to loft the front tire over the deeper washboards/potholes at every RPM range. Power comes on smoothly, fairly easy to maintain traction as long as I didn't crack the throttle open too quickly. Next month I will be getting real off-road tires and rim locks. Kept the TKC 80s for the dyno tuning, they work ok on packed roads and trails, but they take a fair amount more skill to ride on anything dirt or mud as expected. The North Fork is definitely flowing a little faster and higher than it did this past summer. IMG_20201018_165856639.jpg
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  3. MCoupe99

    MCoupe99 Adventurer

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    Only fuel metering, not capable of timing advance.
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  4. OneManWolfPack

    OneManWolfPack Been here awhile

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    Once you have a more aggressive knobby the lofting will get even better. In all reality the TKC is not a bad tire, the heavier bikes knock them for tread life and this is better on the light 500. When I run my "street" wheels (TKCs) it makes me work off road in keeping everything balanced. They don't like mud but any competent rider can get them through 95% of what a real knobby would. You just need more momentum at times and a soft throttle at others. Also TKCs are good if I am riding with less aggressive riders as it evens things out. On the pavement the TKCs with their soft compound are a hoot. If I was dirt touring I would have no problem running TKCs. The best part is that they are cheap to procure from people picking up new bikes and are tossing them.

    Your bike is looking good. It looks like the rear still has somewhere to grab by the fender? The new KTMs lack this and it looks to be a serious oversight.
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  5. MCoupe99

    MCoupe99 Adventurer

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    Thanks. Yes, there are two grab areas by the rear fender (one on each side), nice to have for moving the bike around.

    My last bike (2009 Husky TXC250) that I sold this past summer had Pirelli Scorpion XC tires so I got spoiled by the amount of off-road grip they had compared to the TKCs. I've taken the 501 on all the same areas I rode the 250, but it has taken more skill to get through the tougher / slippery areas with the TKCs, but I agree that a good rider can get through 95% of what a real knobby tire would. The TKCs do work pretty good on asphalt, surprised by the amount of grip when I've taken the bike out a couple of times on short trips around my neighborhood, smooth rolling and hardly any vibration.
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  6. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

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    The Motoz Mountain Hybrid is a great all rounder, and you can really press hard with it on pavement. The carcass is super tough: I have run flat 20 miles without damage. Smooth, quiet, and very predictable when leaned over hard. I get 2200-2500 miles out of this tire with a fair amount of hammering. I need to add Slime to get it to seal up with Tubliss, but it is worth it.

    077C1B48-CDBA-447A-9250-62752840A4FC.jpeg

    The Dunlop D 606 dual sport knobby has been around a long time, and for good reason. It performs well in a variety of conditions, especially mud and loose rock. It howls on the pavement at 60, and lasts me 1000-1200 miles or so.
    A tough tire that excels in the dirt. There are grippier tires available but a powerful bike like my modded 501 eats them up quickly.

    2529FE52-2A76-4487-B1A6-A7003AE387C2.jpeg


    TKC’s are good dual sport tires, but once you go for more grip, especially coupled with more power, it is hard to go back unless you stay on the street. There are lots of choices out there, and I have tried many. Currently I swap between the Dunlop D606 and the Motoz Mountain Hybrid in the 130 size depending on the road/ hard single track ratio of the ride. Both are mounted up with Tubliss so I can repair flats easily or air down to zero psi if necessary to get out of a steep, slick creek bed when exploring off piste. Both tires are also DOT legal, but Tubliss is not.
  7. OneManWolfPack

    OneManWolfPack Been here awhile

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    What fronts are you pairing those up with?
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  8. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

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    2C728B77-2C16-4750-9594-63390E56FE44.jpeg

    It really depends on what terrain you ride most of the time. I try to avoid pavement and really enjoy the harder backcountry type rides. Here in Western Washington, that means decommissioned gravel roads, tank traps, water bars, rocky stream beds, muddy single track, and everything in between. I currently favor the Golden Tire GT 216 aa Fatty. This tire is expensive, but worth it IMHO. A quality DOT tire, the 216 is wider and taller than most. This delivers a bigger contact patch and more shock absorption. The soft compound combined with the bigger contact patch means more traction and a much less chance of washing out the front on wet roots, paint stripes, and the like. We often ride in the wet out here and not dropping the bike in sketchy maneuvers is really important to me. I can’t speak to how the GT Fatty works in drier desert terrain. I make the mental calculation of setting my bike up for more grip and shock absorption in exchange for more frequent tire replacement. Replacing tires is far cheaper than medical bills. Others may have different priorities.
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  9. Fast1

    Fast1 Twisted Throttle

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    Completely agree 100% with your Goldentyre fatty front tire assessment.

    I've found it also works well at speed (up to 80 mph) in deep sand that we experience here in the upper midwest besides the combo of mud, water and roots. Also the tire has worked well for me doing western state BDRs. Game changer front tire for me!

    The benefit of substantially improved grip in mud, roots and rocks with appropriate psi and that extra shock absorption are significant benefits over the large assortment of front tires I've used. Would not hesitate to purchase another (will be my 3rd) regardless of price.
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  10. dogsslober

    dogsslober No neck tie, Ti neck

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    Wonder how it will work with a nitro mousse, think Ill give one a try when my current tire and mousse are done.
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  11. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

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    Buddies run the GT Fatty with the mousse and are happy. My concern would be if you were to run that combo on the pavement at speed. I think that the heat generated by friction within the tire would quickly destroy the mousse. Off road the combo works well.
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  12. dogsslober

    dogsslober No neck tie, Ti neck

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    I've been running nitro mousse on four different tires with some pavement, only 15 to 20 mile sections 60 mph and have not damaged a mousse yet, I do dismount and re lube 1/2 way thru tire wear tho. Mostly trail riding with minimal pavement
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  13. LANCIVPT

    LANCIVPT Carbon Pilot

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    Just returned from a 10 day trip to Bear Creek in Kelowna, BC and Greenstone, Duffy Lake area near Kamloops , BC. This was our last ride of the year. IMG_0839.jpg
    My buddy and I trailered our respective 2020’s out together. IMG_0831.jpg
    Hardest for me was the triple black single track to the lookout overlooking Kelowna and that was when it was still dry. IMG_0111.jpg
    62413920444__9798EC2D-1DDB-45F1-81DA-F2D43E3C00C3.jpg
    Then off to Duffy Lake and we stayed in a cabin next to Face Lake at 5000 ft elevation but we rode around 2000 - 3000 ft plus lower elevation but conditions were very wet. Looking at these pictures you can see how hard up we were to get a last ride in for the season.
    IMG_0874.jpg
    IMG_0885.jpg
    Here we are staging at Duffy Lake.
    IMG_0113.jpg
    IMG_0115.jpg

    Was a great trip although cold and wet at times in icing conditions.
  14. OneManWolfPack

    OneManWolfPack Been here awhile

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    OK thanks. I tried the 216 fatty a few years back and did not care for it. It seemed to slow the steering down and you could feel the flex of the sidewall when trying to turn. I found I was fighting the tire at higher speeds. In the low speed single it tracked well. I think the higher profile may have changed the steering geometry and I failed to raise the forks in the triple clamps to compensate. This may have corrected my steering issues. On thing for sure is that 216 was heavy. Tipped the scales at 5kg.
  15. OlafofOregon

    OlafofOregon Long timer Super Supporter

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    120 running-in miles on the clock. Highway, town, forest roads and single track - breaking it in just like it will be ridden. Ran out of gas once already - about 70 miles on 2 gallons. I expected better MPG. Mirrors have to go. Seat has to go. Floppy license plate hanger too. Feels great to be on a dirt bike again!

    Adjustments.jpg
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  16. Snake Oiler

    Snake Oiler If the world didn't suck, we would all fall off

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    Gas mileage sounds off for a stock setup in my opinion.
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  17. OneManWolfPack

    OneManWolfPack Been here awhile

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    That is a Diablo tank bag?

    That gas mileage is right where mine sits. Hammering it is as low as 10L/100km (24 MPG) to cruising 5L/100km (48 MPG)
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  18. Bearded Hooligan

    Bearded Hooligan Moto Addict

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    First ride on the new to me 2015 501S. Did 500 miles over 4 days, camping each night. Bike ran amazing! Stock exhaust, euro map and fresh rubber. Here it is with all my camping gear loaded up.

    [​IMG]

    End of the second day of riding, about 225-250 miles in, thought I had a rear flat. It was worse than that, rear wheel bearings were toast.

    [​IMG]

    Rode about 5 more miles and found a place to camp. Next morning rode 35 miles to the closest shop. Fortunately they had some and were able to install new ones immediately. Appears that the ones that failed were not sealed bearings. Grab some lunch, back into the woods for some more dirt. Next day heading back to the van, which was about 90 miles away. Bike just dies and wont restart.

    [​IMG]

    Turns out the negative terminal on the battery is no longer attached to the battery. The battery housing had a slight crack. A little JB weld and some bailing wire got it back running.

    [​IMG]

    As soon as I would put the seat back on the added pressure would cause the bike to quit. Decided I would ride without the seat to get back to the van at my parents house. Bailed on the planned route and took pavement back for the quickest way. 75 plus miles standing at highway speeds is quite the workout for the shoulders and core. Normally I go through a used bike after purchase, however, this time I only had it a week and was working on other projects. I only had time to put new tires and grips on it. Went with the Shinko MX316 Fatty, supposed to be a direct copy of the Goldentyre. It was awesome and only $59 or so. Ran the Tusk Dual Sport on the rear and was happy with both at 20psi. Other than the few issues, the bike is awesome and feels like cheating compared to my 950 Super Enduro on the same terrain.

    Headed out

    [​IMG]
  19. OneManWolfPack

    OneManWolfPack Been here awhile

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    Looking at that bearing you are lucky you didn't fubar the hub riding it in for replacements. Looks like the previous owner may have been a little ham fisted/clueless?
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  20. NoelJ

    NoelJ Long timer

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    Has anyone on this thread had both an old 12-16 model as well as a 2020 501 that could summarize what the real differences are? I understand the 20's are lighter, but often "feel" is more important than actual weight [not that I know the real difference there either - real bike weights are often weirdly impossible to pin down]. But engine power/characteristics, size, etc.