Husqvarna FE501S & FE350S

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by trailrider383, Sep 11, 2014.

  1. Fast1

    Fast1 Twisted Throttle

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    Seems puzzling that those racing supercross would use such a wide tire if it really does slow down the quickness of directional changes and climbs out of ruts...

    Wonder if it is just the rider that makes the difference and that can exploit the benefits of the wider width tire since there are certainly ruts that build up on supercross tracks

    upload_2021-7-22_21-21-39.png
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  2. OneManWolfPack

    OneManWolfPack Been here awhile

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    Most motorcross/supercross tracks are soft and they tend to breakdown over an event creating lots of unconsolidated material. I imagine a wider tire in in that stuff is similar to the advantages in sand.
  3. wfv56

    wfv56 Been here awhile

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    Have a feeling my question has been answered in this thread but I can’t find it. I have a 2016 501s I bought new and love. I installed a Recluse clutch at the end of last season. I would like to try a LHRB and think I have seen reference to using the clutch master cylinder to activate the rear brake and dispensing with the brake pedal. Anybody have any details on this procedure?
  4. renogeorge

    renogeorge Let's ride!! Supporter

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    It can be as simple as having a brake line made to run from clutch master to the rear caliper if you don’t want to retain foot brake
  5. wfv56

    wfv56 Been here awhile

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    What about the Recluse slave cylinder connection? Just cap that off? Do you get decent power to the rear brake using the clutch master. Is the only advantage of the the Clake SLR the retention of the clutch lever?
  6. renogeorge

    renogeorge Let's ride!! Supporter

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    Yep. Just remove and cap. A couple I've ridden with this mod seemed fine to me. You could also change the clutch master for one with a different piston size if more is needed. I've never tried a Clake. Rekluse sells a LHRB kit which retains the clutch master and lever and includes a separate rear brake master. It also allows retention of the foot brake if you want. Haven't tried it. But I am about to order one.
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  7. twinrider

    twinrider Pass the catnip

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  8. timeOday

    timeOday Long timer

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    I went the other way. I bought a bike with a left-hand rear brake co-plumbed to the foot brake master (just by using a double banjo bolt), which I converted to a clutch lever.

    Now that I think about it this is a crappy way to do it because the equalization port for the foot brake master will not be sealed off just by squeezing the left-hand brake master, which makes me wonder if it ever worked right.

    In my case the conversion to normal setup worked for about a year before it started leaking, and when I took it apart the rubber seal in the clutch master had swolen to about 30% larger size!
    So, any rubber that has been used with DOT must be replaced before using mineral oil, and I suppose the reverse is true although I don't know firsthand...
  9. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

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    I installed the Rekluse LHRB setup in February on my 2021 KTM 500 XCF-W. I retained the factory foot brake pedal in addition to the handlebar mounted Rekluse master cylinder. I did replace the longish stock clutch lever with a Midwest Mountain shorty lever to fit inside my full wrap HDB hand guards better. Follow the installation and bleeding procedure exactly. Once bled and adjusted I have not needed to make any other adjustments in 90 hours of use. The new gen Rekluse LHRB is powerful enough to lock the rear wheel when needed. After riding with it for several months I can’t imagine riding steep technical terrain without it. Expensive but worth it.
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  10. oldfuddy

    oldfuddy Long timer

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    Nice. Can you post a pic of the new Rekluse LHRB installed? I’ve used the Clake SLR for a long time because it is way more powerful than the mtn bike conversion models out there (including the Gen1 Rekluse) and it tucks in better being more natural of a pull for the hand/finger. It’s dual control as well if needed, but I don’t run the pedal as I prefer the LHRB only. IMG_9166.jpg
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  11. Rot Box

    Rot Box Diesel and Dust

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    I had a left hand rear brake (no foot petal) on my Husky 510 with rekluse that used the clutch master with a custom line to the rear caliper. Very underpowered.. I wouldn’t recommend doing it that way. I switched back to the foot petal. Fwiw
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  12. renogeorge

    renogeorge Let's ride!! Supporter

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    Was that the old setup or the new one?
  13. oldfuddy

    oldfuddy Long timer

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    Concur with early Gen mtn bike type conversions. The Clake SLR however is as powerful as the pedal and with only one finger with more precision. It will lock the rear wheel on slab fully loaded and while sitting just like standing on the pedal. A proper LHRB can make a rider safer and faster off road. It did for me and I moved up a class with it and took a state championship last year. Way more control and precision braking in the technical descents, high speed braking in braking bumps, and right hand corners. Might not be for everyone though.
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  14. Rot Box

    Rot Box Diesel and Dust

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    Not sure what you mean..
  15. Anatoli

    Anatoli Pale rider

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    Here is a photo of my setup. The clutch is on top. I have tested the Clake setup and agree that it is superior. I am just recreational riding so I don’t use the clutch lever much. The Midwest Mountain Shorty Lever was necessary to reduce the pull and possibility of snagging or breaking the long stock lever.

    • 4FD3976A-785E-4241-941B-F83FA4B4ECC2.jpeg
  16. Rot Box

    Rot Box Diesel and Dust

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    I re-read my post and I guess I should clarify. I had a rekluse clutch and did not have a clutch lever. Mine used the stock clutch lever/master cylinder for the brake on the rear wheel. Was not great… I think the setups you guys have posted are probably much-much better than mine was.
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  17. Snake Oiler

    Snake Oiler If the world didn't suck, we would all fall off

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    I have both of the clake setups ( pro and 2 lever) here in a box. Been hesitant about installing them while traveling away from familiar riding. But now I'm heading to the mountains in WY it might be a good idea to test them. Tough making up my mind.
  18. renogeorge

    renogeorge Let's ride!! Supporter

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    Rekluse recently came out with a new version of their LHRB. It supposedly has a different master cylinder which is adjustable in and out with a track setup. To give better lever placement while competing with other stuff on that end of the bar.
    LEFT HAND REAR BRAKE KIT | Rekluse

    OK. I see from your latest post you didn't use the Rekluse LHRB kit. Thanks
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  19. renogeorge

    renogeorge Let's ride!! Supporter

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    What is it that the Clake does that makes it superior? Thanks
  20. oldfuddy

    oldfuddy Long timer

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    Engineering wise the Clake is far superior to anything out there IMO. I used almost all of them. Used a Clake 2 for a non auto clutch bike (brilliant design) and the Clake SLR for the Rekluse bikes. Billet machined boss, larger master cylinder providing firmer feel and more power to brake and it is the only kit one I’m aware of that mounts in a way that you don’t have to have the clutch lever or LHRB at a weird angle up or down which can make for an awkward pull and feel when standing and can put the wrist at a bad angle that could snap the wrist if hitting a g-out or sharp edge unexpectedly. The Clake mounts with the levers in a normal location. This also protects the Clake lever and master better as it’s lined up right behind the bark busters. The downside to a Clake is it makes it hard to run flags unless you use the stock KTM/Husky flag base and then mount SxS flags. The SxS flag with the burly mount doesn’t line up well on the clutch side running a Clake SLR. Another downside to the Clake is it’s not cheap. Bleeding is easy on the SLR. The Clake, as with any LHRB set up where you keep the rear pedal can make bleeding a little harder. Takes more patience. That said, as with any dual set up (keeping the pedal) you sacrifice some LHRB braking power, that’s why I remove the pedal. Removing the pedal and using the SLR is just as powerful as a pedal, but using one finger. Not everyone is a fan though. After 50 years of riding I thought I’d miss the pedal, only took a couple rides to get used to it. Even the Clake 2 which seems like it would take a while to get used to is pretty intuitive and quickly learned. These LHRbs aren’t for every one though. Best to try one out first before dropping the cash IMO. Nothing wrong with a 100 years of a rear brake pedals on these things.
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