I&G plans for the Trans America Trail by CCM GP450 & Honda CRF250L

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Drumbrakes, Jan 4, 2016.

  1. kingrj

    kingrj Been here awhile

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    Last summer I did the TAT from the MS/AR border out to Utah, took the UBDR up to Idaho and then slabbed it back to MS (4500 miles) on a KTM690E. I used a TKC-80 front tire and a Mefo Super Explorer rear. They lasted the whole trip and I never needed any more grip anywhere. The year before I used a MT-21 on the rear riding the CDR and I had to have a tire on the way back in Montana. I put on a TKC-80 fresh and by the time I got back to Colorado it was over 1/2 worn out. The Mefo's are the bomb!

    The only issues I have ever had on those trips were pinch flats on the front. Use HD tubes and carry spares. If you have a cable actuated clutch take a spare clutch cable. Put on a new chain before you go unless your current chain has less than 5000 miles on it. Lay out ALL of the stuff you plan to take in the floor and then take only 1/2 of that! The lighter your bike is the more fun you will have..As mentioned earlier Wal-Mart can provide anything you really need. On some trips I just throw underwear away as I go and buy new along the way. NOBODY is going to check your helmet OR check to see if your tires are DOT approved! Hell you are not likely to even SEE any law enforcement along the trip! Some folks will tell you that you will need a separate Colorado OHV permit for you bike even though it is properly registered and tagged. That is NOT my experience. I only put OHV stickers on OHV vehicles that are NOT tagged.

    As far as safety is concerned...I strongly advise taking a SPOT locator. The western US is big country...stuff can happen and you might not get help for days if you get stranded.

    This is one of the best motorcycle trips I ever made and it will give you a spectacular view of the US. However....I am going to get myself in trouble for telling your this...skip the western Oklahoma part of the TAT and just stay on pavement until you get to NM. Especially if it has rained!!! I rode about half of the western portion until I decided I was either going to hit the pavement and get on with it, or stop and slash my wrists! My apology to the good people of Oklahoma...
    #81
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  2. Wreckchecker

    Wreckchecker Ungeneer to broked stuff. Supporter

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    Good post!
    #82
  3. kingrj

    kingrj Been here awhile

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    [​IMG] One more thing..MUD! I have ridden through TN mud, MS mud, Arkansas mud and Colorado mud..but Utah mud is the MackDaddy of all mud! God I HATE Utah mud! My strongest advice is that once you hit Utah..if it has been raining lots..take a day off and let it dry out some before you set out. There are some parts where the mud will cake up on your wheels and stick so bad that it will burn your clutch out and lock up your front wheel! Last year the Utah mud resulted in one rider in my group going into a mad goat dance fit and going home in a rented car and trailer..30 min later another buddy highsided on a muddy trail breaking 5 ribs and a collarbone. Let me tell you again...I HATE UTAH MUD!
    #83
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  4. Drumbrakes

    Drumbrakes Been here awhile Supporter

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    Mefo Super Explorer
    [​IMG]
    Heidenau K60
    [​IMG]

    The K60s are what I have fitted just now.
    they seem just about identical.
    #84
  5. kingrj

    kingrj Been here awhile

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    These will work just fine on anything you will encounter..With respect to other posters advice they may be much faster more aggressive riders needing a different tire for their riding style..for slow old me the Mefo was just fine and went the whole distance..
    #85
  6. wianbiggar

    wianbiggar Been here awhile

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    DB
    That's a more comprehensive tool kit than I have in my garage!!
    If I may - Watch you don't fall into the trap of trying to be prepared for every thing that could go wrong - you can't and if something does go wrong it'll need the one tool you didn't bring! Ask me how......
    And where's the adventure? BTW have you weighed the toolkit?
    Ian
    #86
  7. Drumbrakes

    Drumbrakes Been here awhile Supporter

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    Travel light, Move Fast!
    I've left out the MIG welder and compressor with the 25litre reservoir, the metre long socket lever, and the land-rover needed to carry them.

    My first attempt at the trip toolkit was weighed in November and was 5kg. That was without tyre levers or sockets to fit the rear wheels, but otherwise very comprehensive
    I've trimmed it down a lot since then, and although I've not weighed it, I think it's definitely under 2kg now.

    Here's the photos of it at 5kg.
    .[​IMG]
    +
    [​IMG]
    =
    [​IMG]

    I'm still taking the little socket set, but the big tool roll has been ditched and replaced with a much smaller one.
    #87
  8. Drumbrakes

    Drumbrakes Been here awhile Supporter

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    I appreciate the advice. As you say, different riders have different riding styles, and a some will do fine with a more road biased tyre than others.
    However, I have to ask.
    Do you think the Utah mud might have been easier to deal with if you'd had more aggressive knobbly tyres?
    #88
  9. kingrj

    kingrj Been here awhile

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    The photo of the mud in my post was AFTER I had scraped it all off and was going to try to go another 40 meters on the bike before I had to stop and scrape it off again..ANY tread pattern will fill up in one revolution in this stuff...Traction was not the problem...it was mud building up on the tire..Earlier in the trip I had to traverse Arkansas field roads (as you will too!) right after a rain. This mud was slick as owl feces (the slickest known substance on earth) but there it did not build up at all. I did as well as all of the rest of my group on various DOT tires. In THAT mud a full on motorcross tire would have been better I believe.
    #89
  10. Little Bike

    Little Bike Air/Clutz Sue Supporter

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    I'm looking forward to your RR, it's fun to see your home through someone else's experiences.

    Powwows, go, not all are open to the public, I'm sure with some internet searching you can find one to attend.

    Go to a rodeo, check out local fairs, eat BBQ. I don't know the route of the whole TAT, but if you're near Cody, Wyoming, there's a fabulous museum - Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

    And +1 on the SPOT
    #90
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  11. Drumbrakes

    Drumbrakes Been here awhile Supporter

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    Thanks,
    I do have a Spot gen 3, (although not planning on public location sharing at present).
    Just going to tuck it in the top of my top bags, to keep it away from the other gps devices at the front.(apparently they don't like being too close)

    The route is either the latest version (red dots):
    [​IMG]
    or the original version;
    [​IMG]
    I'm getting the updated maps, which go around Nevada, and will decide which option to take when we're in Utah.
    #91
  12. wianbiggar

    wianbiggar Been here awhile

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    Personally I would have take the welder and the LR!
    Ian
    #92
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  13. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer Supporter

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    There is really no need to take any wrench, socket, screwdriver, or ANY tool that you don't need for the fasteners on your bike. I would think that out of all the stuff in that socket set, most of it you don't need.

    Here is my tool kit for my WR. It has every thing I need to just about rebuild the whole bike.
    (My tire tools are in a separate tool tube mounted on the bike)

    IMG_0219.jpg
    #93
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  14. Drumbrakes

    Drumbrakes Been here awhile Supporter

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    I agree there's no point taking tools I don't need. I need tools for my bike and my wife's bike, however you're wrong to say I don't need most of the items in that small socket set.
    There are a few bits that aren't needed, but taking them out an 11mm socket saves no space and only a few grams.

    I do have 14,13,12,10,9,8 & 7mm nuts and bolts between my gp450 and the wife's klx.
    We also have 3,4,5,6 & 8mm hex / allen fasteners, cross head screws in a few places and a couple of flat screws (also useful if you need to pry open a small gap)

    I have already swapped the torq bits for ball ended hex, and the special tractive suspension bit as there are a few hard to reach hex bolts on my bike, but no torq fasteners on either bike.
    #94
  15. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer Supporter

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    Not wrong at all. Take what you need out of the box and put them in a smaller container. I've found the containers tools come in take up a bunch of space. I like to compact my stuff as much as I can. The less space your stuff takes up the better as most will agree. Looks like you've got your stuff pretty well sorted for your kit....and you did ask for advice....Have a great ride.
    #95
  16. Drumbrakes

    Drumbrakes Been here awhile Supporter

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    I did ask for advice and it wasn't my intention to sound ungrateful for your comments.
    Sorry if it came across that way.
    I just to say that I have considered what's in that box and that most of it does fit something on our bikes.
    That box is just over 4" long, less than 3" wide and just over 1" high. It fits quite a lot in a fairly small space (compared to most other socket sets), yet it's all neatly laid out.

    Tool rolls are fine for larger items but where do you keep those sockets and the hex bits? In the pouch at the side? Don't you find hunting for the right socket at the side of the trail annoying?

    I was still assuming all breakdowns happen in the cold & wet and I'd rather get the right tool quickly while I can still feel my fingers. (This toolkit is for these bikes at home, as well as on the TAT, where finding shade might be more of a problem)

    BTW, what's the hook for?
    #96
  17. Tewster2

    Tewster2 Long timer Supporter

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    The hook is for retrieving a nut or washer when I drop them down inside the frame or any other place that is hard to reach. The other end has a little magnet on it for stuff I can't hook. Sometimes a little tool like the hook is the only way to get to stuff. I've used it several times as I'm a bit clumsy. I hate when I drop a nut and don't hear it hit the floor haha.

    My sockets and little stuff all go in the small pouch. If I need to use the stuff I just grab a handful out of the pouch and place them on the black flap that is part of the tool roll. The items are easy to see. I never have to hunt for a socket or Allen wrench because I only carry a few. When I'm done I just scoop them up and zip the pouch shut.

    There are tons of ways folks put their tool kits together. The is a thread in the Equipment forum that has a lot of info about the various kits.
    #97
  18. Drumbrakes

    Drumbrakes Been here awhile Supporter

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    Current tool kit:
    [​IMG]

    packed:
    [​IMG]
    Tool roll comes in just under 2kg, including tyre levers.
    The compressor is about 700g (inc bag and seperate pressure gauge), prop stand 550g and socket set 700 g together come to another 2kg.

    Just for comparison to the socket set, Motion Pro's metric trail compact tool Do-dah comes to just over 500g, doesn't include a few of the sockets I need, and is nowhere near as convenient to use. It is, I admit, much more compact, which is why it has a home under the seat of my V-strom
    #98
  19. wianbiggar

    wianbiggar Been here awhile

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    Wonderful - well done on decreasing the size and Weight
    Ian
    #99
  20. pinball1008

    pinball1008 Been here awhile

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    "Tool roll comes in just under 2kg, including tyre levers.
    The compressor is about 700g (inc bag and seperate pressure gauge), prop stand 550g and socket set 700 g together come to another 2kg."
    4kg seems a lot and at first I thought you'd got a lot of unnecessary bits. Of course, it's for 2 bikes and it now makes more sense. How many tubes will you carry between you and are you lifting the tools between the 2 bikes?
    BTW MP trail tool with additional bits added is 450g, just weighed it