I Want A Pair Of Boots, That Do It All !!!

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by FREDO RIDER, Jun 12, 2006.

  1. blackmamba

    blackmamba Been here awhile

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    I got my VENDRAMINI MARATHON STEEL boots today.

    They are comfortable straight from the box.
    They are almost too beautifull to use for motorcycle riding. The craftmanship really is in a different class to the other dual sport boots. Good quality leather.
    "Profumo di pelle"


    Got the coconut insoles in the box as well.

    AND, + 3 for Trophy Cycle Apparel/MapleafMoto who shipped fast and gave me a bike mag to boot.
    :clap

    cheers
    :1drink
  2. phqueto

    phqueto Adventurer

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    [​IMG]has any tryedthese ? they look like they could be resoled getten tired of spending $ on boots that the sole wears out whe the uppers look brand new
  3. joey185

    joey185 It's a momo Dada

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    Has anybody considered the Fox Offraod Comp 5 or the Alpinestars Tech 3 All Terrain ( take steel cap off if you dont want store owners yelling at you that you scratched their floor.) I think if you want dual sport protection, then one of these is the boot. I'm thinking of these. I ride with my old tech 8's but want something a little more friendly looking and better grip but still want to know when my 500lbs of bike falls and pins my ankle or foot that I'm gonna be OK.
  4. joey185

    joey185 It's a momo Dada

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  5. globewanderer

    globewanderer n00b

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    Remakable! Ever thought of purchasing boots for riding and leaving a pair or two of shoes in the office. I have noticed that it doesn't take a whole lot of time to like slip out of ski boots, motocross boots, snow shoes (I'm Canadian) etc into a pair of shoes, work the day then change back again.

    You may want to go to the Rossi boot website in Australia and check out the Rossi Vision. Theyr'e about the best adventure boot I have found but unfortunately they are not known in North America yet. Second to them (at least for me) is the Aerostich. Good luck and throw in a pair of clean socks with the shoes.

    Globewanderer
    Kashmir, India for the moment
  6. LoneStrom

    LoneStrom Been here awhile

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    I had a pair of those for a few years with mixed feelings. They are a solid, well made boot but I didn't think they were that great for motorcycling. The boot is split all the way up the outside so I never could get them watertight. It was pretty much pointless even though the leather was well treated and waterproof. My feet would come out black from a good rain shower.

    No real ankle support either, for the money I'd go with the combat lites if you like that kind of style boot.
  7. OJHengen

    OJHengen Orv Hengen

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    Amazing! This thread was started in 2006 and is still going strong. As for boots, I've tried several, but am sitting here in my office still wearing the boots I rode in with this morning; they are more comfortable than my dress shoes! I ride extensively - long cross-country trips of thousands of miles, and a daily commute of 90. I use the BMW Pro Touring boot year-round in all climates. Comfortable, cool or warm enough, and waterproof. The best I have ever worn, period. I also like my vented BMW boots, but they are summer only and not waterproof; plus, they are kind of low-cut (very comfortable, though). I have a pair of Savannah boots I like, too, but they are not nearly as comfortable to walk in. I do like their weight and protection though...

    Orv Hengen
  8. ADVrealtor

    ADVrealtor Work 10, Travel 2...

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    Where do you order the buckles to modify the Combat boots?
    Chris
  9. P B G

    P B G Long timer

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    I change shoes when I get to work because they get messy in the lab.

    But then again, there are days when I ride not to the lab, but to someone else's office, and I don't keep a pair of shoes at every place I go.

    And it would be odd I think to walk it, and change my shoes in the reception of some business.
  10. FREDO RIDER

    FREDO RIDER Enjoying the path !

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  11. batoutoflahonda

    batoutoflahonda Long timer

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    So while researching foot protection and what actually causes and gets broken during a crash, I found this.



    Prevalence and patterns of foot injuries following motorcycle trauma.

    Jeffers RF, Tan HB, Nicolopoulos C, Kamath R, Giannoudis PV.
    Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, St James 's University Hospital, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and patterns of foot injuries following motorcycle trauma. DESIGN: Prospective. SETTING: Yorkshire Region Trauma Units (Level 1 trauma centers with trauma research). PATIENTS: Individuals injured in motorcycle road traffic accidents between January 1993 and December 1999. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Patient demographics, protective devices (helmet) use, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), clinical details, therapeutic interventions, resuscitation requirements, duration of hospital stay, mortality, and type of foot injuries sustained. RESULTS: The parent population of 1239 contained 53 (4.3%) foot-injured motorcyclists (49 men) with a mean age of 31.7 years (range 18-79 years). Fifty-two were drivers and one was a rear-seat passenger. Mean ISS was 6.9 (range 4-33), significantly lower than the parent population mean of 34.98 (range 9-75) (P = 0.001). Mean GCS was 14.7 (range 13-15). The motorcyclists' injuries included 26 metatarsal fractures (49.1%), 14 talar fractures (26.4%), 7 os calcis fractures (13.2%), and 6 toe fractures (11.3%). Associated foot injuries included three partial foot amputations, four Lisfranc dislocations, three cases of foot compartment syndrome (two crush injuries with no fracture, one open fourth metatarsal fracture with associated Lisfranc dislocation). Forty-six motorcyclists had more than one foot injury. Associated injuries included 22 ankle fractures (41.5%), 15 tibial fractures (28.3%), 6 femoral fractures (11.3%), 5 pelvic ring fractures (9.4%), 23 upper limb injuries (43.4%), and 3 cases of chest trauma (5.7%). No one sustained abdominal trauma or head injury compared with the parent population. All patients required operative stabilization of foot fractures, including their associated injuries. Mean hospital stay was 10.9 days (range 1-35 days). In the parent population, there were 71 deaths (6.0%), whereas there was only 1 death (1.9%) in the foot-injured group (with fractures including open book pelvic, T6-8, unilateral open femur, tibial, ankle, and metatarsal) with an ISS 33, who died of multiorgan dysfunction syndrome. At final follow-up, all patients underwent radiologic and clinical assessment of foot injuries. Forty-three patients returned to their previous occupation and level of mobility. Ten of the more significantly injured patients had to modify their occupation from manual to sedentary-type jobs due to their foot injuries. We noted a pattern of complex ipsilateral foot and limb injury in nine patients, which we postulate was due to the actual mechanism of contact with the road surface. CONCLUSION: Motorcycle accidents continue to be a source of severe injury, especially to the foot. The most common foot injury is a metatarsal fracture; however, there must be a high index of suspicion for associated injuries. Although these injuries are associated with a low mortality rate, they require prompt assessment and treatment to limit long-term morbidity and disability. The difference in foot injury pattern and mortality between the parent population and our series, among other factors, potentially may be influenced by the actual mechanism of contact with the road surface and the modifying action of the foot during the accident.
  12. EDG1911

    EDG1911 Banana Cream!

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    [​IMG]

    Prevalence and patterns of foot injuries following motorcycle trauma.

    Jeffers RF, Tan HB, Nicolopoulos C, Kamath R, Giannoudis PV.
    Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, St James 's University Hospital, Leeds, United Kingdom.
    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and patterns of foot injuries following motorcycle trauma.

    DESIGN: Prospective.

    SETTING: Yorkshire Region Trauma Units (Level 1 trauma centers with trauma research).

    PATIENTS: Individuals injured in motorcycle road traffic accidents between January 1993 and December 1999.

    OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Patient demographics, protective devices (helmet) use, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), clinical details, therapeutic interventions, resuscitation requirements, duration of hospital stay, mortality, and type of foot injuries sustained.

    RESULTS: The parent population of 1239 contained 53 (4.3%) foot-injured motorcyclists (49 men) with a mean age of 31.7 years (range 18-79 years).

    Fifty-two were drivers and one was a rear-seat passenger.

    Mean ISS was 6.9 (range 4-33), significantly lower than the parent population mean of 34.98 (range 9-75) (P = 0.001).

    Mean GCS was 14.7 (range 13-15).

    The motorcyclists' injuries included 26 metatarsal fractures (49.1%), 14 talar fractures (26.4%), 7 os calcis fractures (13.2%), and 6 toe fractures (11.3%).

    Associated foot injuries included three partial foot amputations, four Lisfranc dislocations, three cases of foot compartment syndrome (two crush injuries with no fracture, one open fourth metatarsal fracture with associated Lisfranc dislocation).

    Forty-six motorcyclists had more than one foot injury.
    Associated injuries included 22 ankle fractures (41.5%), 15 tibial fractures (28.3%), 6 femoral fractures (11.3%), 5 pelvic ring fractures (9.4%), 23 upper limb injuries (43.4%), and 3 cases of chest trauma (5.7%).

    No one sustained abdominal trauma or head injury compared with the parent population.

    All patients required operative stabilization of foot fractures, including their associated injuries. Mean hospital stay was 10.9 days (range 1-35 days).

    In the parent population, there were 71 deaths (6.0%), whereas there was only 1 death (1.9%) in the foot-injured group (with fractures including open book pelvic, T6-8, unilateral open femur, tibial, ankle, and metatarsal) with an ISS 33, who died of multiorgan dysfunction syndrome.

    At final follow-up, all patients underwent radiologic and clinical assessment of foot injuries.

    Forty-three patients returned to their previous occupation and level of mobility.

    Ten of the more significantly injured patients had to modify their occupation from manual to sedentary-type jobs due to their foot injuries.

    We noted a pattern of complex ipsilateral foot and limb injury in nine patients, which we postulate was due to the actual mechanism of contact with the road surface.

    CONCLUSION: Motorcycle accidents continue to be a source of severe injury, especially to the foot.

    The most common foot injury is a metatarsal fracture; however, there must be a high index of suspicion for associated injuries.

    Although these injuries are associated with a low mortality rate, they require prompt assessment and treatment to limit long-term morbidity and disability.

    The difference in foot injury pattern and mortality between the parent population and our series, among other factors, potentially may be influenced by the actual mechanism of contact with the road surface and the modifying action of the foot during the accident.
  13. Asphalt Assault

    Asphalt Assault Been here awhile

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    Can anyone here provide some insight on the Marathon Steel boots on sportbikes or sport touring bikes? I'm looking to invest in a solid pair of boots and love the reviews the Marathon is getting, just not sure if it will equal out to clunky shifting. I have an F800S.

    Any suggestions or alternatives?
  14. MADSTROM

    MADSTROM Long timer

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    Should be fine. The toe is just a little thicker than some lighter weight boots but I made a slight adjustment to the shifter linkage and never gave it another thought from that point on. They are very flexible in the ankle if that's what you are concerned about. They are 2.8mm leather crush resistant etc.
  15. esblow

    esblow Adventurer

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    I just want chip in my two cents since I've been on the perfect boot hunt for a couple of months now and this thread has helped alot. I'll be honest though, I havent read all 1154 posts. Only about 900 or so.

    For me the perfect pair of boots would be (in no particular order): waterproof, not too hot, protective, comfortable enough to commute to work in rain-or-shine, then wear in the office all day without looking like a goof, take short hikes in, take very long rides in, check out a museum, etc. Same as the original post by Fredo.

    I wanted to take it a step further in my pursuit for impossibility by going super-budget using Craiglsist and ebay AND STILL get a perfect pair of boots.

    It took a few tries over a couple of months, but I finally did it.

    First I bought a pair of Oxtar boots off ebay for $25 shipping included. When I got them they were in decent shape, but not at all the perfect pair of boots even if they were new. The length was a good, the width was good, and by the numbers they should have fit, but the toe box felt like a rock climbing shoe. I've since learned that motorcycle boot sizing is about as accurate as a Yogi Berra quote.
    Sorry, no pics.

    Next I found a pair of very used Triumph Gore-Tex boots on Craigslist for $15. Because of inaccurate Euro/US sizing conversion they were a bit big even with two pairs of inserts and since it was a Velcro only closure, which was pretty worn out, I couldnt get a good fit. If I had bought this boot new ($179) though I think they would have been a good contender for the perfect pair of boots.

    Finally I bought a pair of used Daytona Roadstar GTX boots for $100. Now, I know that $100 isnt in super-budget category and that I could have bought a pair of brand new boots for a little bit more, but these boots really are the perfect pair of boots for me. If I could justify $449.95 for a new pair of these I would. But I cant. So I'm really happy to get a pair for a c-note. They fit great, and so far fit the bill for the perfect boot. We'll see how they do once summer comes back around though. But since I live and commute around San Francisco I think they will be fine.
    <img src="http://lh4.ggpht.com/_rfDgCge6WCg/TNt-cNQIiVI/AAAAAAAACEQ/jciKH64UdhM/s400/DSCN1239.jpg" height="300" width="400" />
  16. marchyman

    marchyman barely informed Supporter

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    I'm surprised you found a used pair for sale! In case you don't know... (and I don't remember if I mentioned it sometime during the several years this thread has been around) they can be re-soled. Helimot does the job, although sometimes you have to wait a bit if he doesn't have the needed size sole in stock. When the boots come back they'll be good for many more years of use.
  17. esblow

    esblow Adventurer

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    Yeah, its kind of funny about that. I did as much research as I could about the boots before I met the guy to try them on. The guy I bought them from didnt know that Helimot would re-sole them and he had them re-soled somewere else. I have no idea where, but It says Michelin on the bottom of the soles. He didnt look very happy as he handed them over to me after I just given him more information about his boots than he knew himsef.
  18. B-B

    B-B out of my lane

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    Just wanted to say i bought a pair of TCX X-Five boots last year and there's already a hole in the shift pad from my shifter. Pretty much cosmetic I think but pretty low mileage for wear like this.
  19. 1200gsceej

    1200gsceej wanabee overachiever

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    Mind if I ask how much they were? :ear
    And how about US to European sizing?
    (I'm getting more and more interested in these boots ...)
    -ceej

  20. Mr. B

    Mr. B Slowpoke

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    You got a good deal. I have been thinking about selling mine but I wouldn't let them go quite so cheaply.