Internet to shop or outbuilding

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HickOnACrick, Oct 4, 2019.

  1. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    Okay, so many times I wish I had internet access in my shop. My shop is about 100 yards from my house, and my cell-signal is not strong enough to load much of anything, especially videos. Add to that, I am too damn old to look at a small screen for assessing technical data.

    The cell signal at my home is too weak to use as a hotpoint.

    And being a complete dumbass, I neglected to ask the contractor to run an ethernet cable when he ran power and water to the shop.

    This is what I have tried so far:

    https://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-Powe...=netgear+powerline+1200&qid=1570235469&sr=8-3

    This system is supposed to use the copper wiring of your home to extend the wifi to a distant point. Although it works well in my home, it was a failure to my shop. Essentially what I can gather is that although the home and shop are on the same electrical feed, there are two different fuse boxes, one in the home, and one in the shop, and two different boxes negates the transfer of signal.

    So what I am thinking of next is a point-to-point wifi transmitter. Something like this:
    https://www.amazon.com/EZ-Bridge-Lite-EZBR-0214-Outdoor-Wireless-System/dp/B002K683V0/ref=sr_1_1?crid=33ZI2EBY7WYTC&keywords=tycon+ez+bridge+lt&qid=1570233984&sprefix=tycon+ez,aps,140&sr=8-1

    In concept, it takes your wifi signal and transmits it across open space to a receiver. the receiver accepts the signal and then by use of and an access point, I can transmit that signal into my shop (wirelessly or via ethernet to a device).

    Anyone have any experience with either of the two?
    #1
  2. mitchapalooza

    mitchapalooza Rider is Air-cooled Supporter

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    https://airmax.ui.com

    I've used Ubiquiti stuff professionally and personally. Really user friendly and great quality and stability if you can get past price tags.
    #2
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  3. abramsgunner

    abramsgunner Been here awhile

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    +1 on Ubiquiti gear.. good stuff at a good price.

    You can do a simple 5GHz bridge with a pair of Nanostations, or I believe you can setup a pair of Unifi Mesh radios to bridge on the 5GHz channels and still connect mobile devices to the 2.4GHz side (haven't played with them yet).

    Running copper in the ground is just an invitation to replace your equipment any time lightning hits anywhere near your house.
    #3
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  4. oldmanb777

    oldmanb777 Just say NO to socialism!

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    Can't you just run cheap cable from the house to the shop? "T" off the cable. Put in a wifi box in the shop? Burry the cable. Our cables are not buried very deep.
    #4
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  5. szurszewski

    szurszewski Long timer

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  6. Beezer

    Beezer Long timer Supporter

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    no. thats where I go to get away from... ah... the stuff...
    #6
  7. Motopsychoman

    Motopsychoman Not a total poseur Supporter

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    If you do pull a CAT6 cable between buildings (150m max distance) you should install a surge suppressor at both ends. You could alternatively add a cheap network switch at each end as they are magnetically coupled.
    #7
  8. josjor

    josjor Long timer

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    +1 on Ubiquiti. A lot of the farmers and ranchers around here use their stuff to get to their outbuildings.
    #8
  9. Steve_h

    Steve_h Been here awhile

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    I'd go with a wireless solution. Years ago we had a customer that had a wired connection to an outbuilding for 1 pc. Just about every time there was a good thunderstorm, it was replace either the card in the pc or the switch in the main building. When wireless finally came of age and we could get some decent stuff, they switched to wireless and no more blown anything.

    I read a good article on why that happens years ago. Something about ground potential. Since both buildings are grounded at the building, there is a voltage potential difference between them because of the distance. The network cable is then used to equalize the difference in potential.
    #9
  10. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    Timely thread.
    I've been researching this same issue; as far as I can tell,each and every device has pros and cons though,generally speaking, the less it costs the worse it is.
    #10
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  11. abramsgunner

    abramsgunner Been here awhile

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    I've found this to be true as well.. but i can say that Ubiquiti gear is generally dirt cheap and I've got outdoor installations in the weather that have had zero issues since I installed them 6 or 7 years ago. Not bad for a sub-$80 radio.
    #11
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  12. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    Let me ask you this,beyond getting signal in my barn, what Ubiquiti gear would reliably boost the DSL Wi-Fi within the walls of our home ??
    #12
  13. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    If your wifi router is out of the way, you could put a parabolic reflector behind it, pointed at your shed. I have a friend in Eugene OR that shares internet between his home and office this way -- about a 4 mile separation.
    #13
  14. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    4 mi ?!? Whoa!


    First,I'd like to cover 2 floors of house plus the attic with existing WiFi signal.

    Then I'd like to get signal to the barn which is a mere 150 ft away.
    #14
  15. configurationspace

    configurationspace delooper

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    Yeah, he's lucky his office window faces his house, and the two are separated by a valley so he has clear line-of-sight.
    #15
  16. 5th-Elefant

    5th-Elefant Long timer

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    I’ve got some point to point kuwifi bridges for my barn. About 70 yards or so. Had them a year. They’ve been faultless.
    #16
  17. HickOnACrick

    HickOnACrick Groovinator

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    I had really good results using the Netgear Powerline 1200 within my house. You get two transmitters in the box and they use the internal circuitry of your home to extend the signal. The key is to not connect them to a surge protector, rather directly into the wall outlet. There are a number of Youtube videos describing how to do the installation. You will also need to purchase a second access wireless access point if you want wireless...or purchase their product that has antennae that extend act as an access point (they have antennae and plug directly to you wall outlet).

    Someone with better electrical knowledge may be able to chime in about the pros/cons about not having a surge protector.

    Outside of that, your best bet is to run ethernet cable directly from your router to wireless access points like Google Wifi mesh access points. The Google mesh access pints can either receive signal wirelessly or via ethernet cables. If your router is centrally located, and the internal walls of your home are drywall, you may get by with wireless mesh. If your walls are brick, plaster, mortar, or cement, you'll have poor results running a wireless mesh.

    Regardless, get a receipt when you purchase and make sure the company accepts returns. If it doesn't work, get you $$ back.
    #17
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  18. beemerphile

    beemerphile Unreconstructed Southerner Supporter

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    Where I live buried ethernet cable is a lightning magnet. I'd run fiber underground or wireless bridge. My shop and house are on separate transformers so I couldn't use powerline. I used an EZ Bridge before I did the underground. It worked great. In fact, it is still working great up to my woodshed where I have some cameras watching the upper end of the driveway - about 800 feet spread and carries a couple of 4MP cameras at full frame rate. I've also used Ubiquiti and Engenius with good results on other installations. To solve the lightning problem with buried CAT5 I ended up putting a $5 Netgear GS205 5 port switch (using only one in / one out) and both ends of the wire to use as a "fuse" because it was cheaper than ethernet IVS protection.
    #18
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  19. abramsgunner

    abramsgunner Been here awhile

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    EDIT: I've never used them, but I have a customer that bought one of the Google Mesh systems for his house and he loves it. The standard kit gives you three radios so you can cover a pretty large house. The primary radio attaches to your router, and the other two link to the primary to extend coverage.
    #19
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  20. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    Google Mesh may be the answer to inside our home,wondering if it's worth trying the 3 pack to hit the barn/garage as well ..?

    Since our ISP requires use of their supplied DSL modem, looks like Google Mesh will not work... :cry
    #20