Internet to shop or outbuilding

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by HickOnACrick, Oct 4, 2019.

  1. abramsgunner

    abramsgunner Been here awhile

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    You can usually put the DSL modem in bridge mode and use any router you want. I'm sure there are some out there that won't do bridge mode, but your ISP should be able to get you a model that can. Most DSL connections in my area can be put in bridge and then your router connects and logs in using your PPPOE credentials. Note: I live in the sticks, so we're a year or two behind the civilized world... YMMV
    #21
  2. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

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    You can usually log in to the modem, turn off its router, and plug any router you want into the ethernet port on the modem.
    #22
  3. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    I,too,am in the sticks- though our neighbor has fiberoptic,somehow...

    Your first sentence is exactly the issue- afaik, our ISP issues one,and only one, type of modem.

    For a charge,of course.

    It really sounds like Mesh is exactly what I've been searching for,though.
    #23
  4. ozmoses

    ozmoses . Supporter

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    This is so far above my analog brain pay grade that I just got dizzy and fell down.
    #24
  5. Johann

    Johann Commuterous Tankslapperous

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    In general connecting a WIFI router to an existing DSL modem/router or another WIFI router just involves ethernet cable (Cat5 will be good enough for most applications).

    Look for routers that are also designed to be WIFI switches and they should be plug and play, on the setup screen when you are configuring them (laptop connected to router with ethernet cable) there will be an option to select them as a secondary WIFI router. You shouldn´t even need to play about with IP addresses . Keep the name of the second router (SSID) the same as well as the login details and you will in theory be able to roam seamlessly between the two routers.
    #25
  6. Peculierboy

    Peculierboy Adventurer

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    +1 on the Ubiquiti solution. I use them professionally and at home as well. Check out this guys tutorial to get better wifi in his RV, https://outsideourbubble.com/build-a-private-rv-wi-fi-system-for-under-100/ it explains it in laymen terms and makes it easy to understand and set up.
    #26
    mitchapalooza likes this.
  7. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    Mesh router and one or two satellites.
    10-15 minute install, $200-$400 all in cost. DIY install.

    I cover 2.5 acres with 100 Mbps home 4000 sqft, shop 1000 sqft.

    Several choices:
    Netgear Orbi Whole Home Mesh Wi-Fi System
    #27
  8. B02S4

    B02S4 Aye

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    Simple solutions first...OP, if you have not already done so, I suggest optimizing your existing WIFI setup with Wifi Analyzer or other signal analyzer app of your choice. AP router placement, gain &/or directional router antennae, & the right extender/s might just get you there, and will no doubt improve your coverage. It is easy but takes time & effort to get there. Totally worth it. And recheck from time to time. Things around you might change. Where I am, they certainly do.
    #28
  9. REALGRAVEROBBER

    REALGRAVEROBBER LEAVING GRAVES EMPTY

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    The range extender utilizing the 110v circuit in your home have good reviews.

    Wi-Fi repeaters may also be an inexpensive option.

    Your pal, Lance in Montana
    #29
  10. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Since we took the FTTP upgrade recently (300+Mb!) the ISP gave us three wifi repeaters that are alleged to go out to 200 metres. Certainly works are far as we can go in our garden.
    #30
  11. abramsgunner

    abramsgunner Been here awhile

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    Honestly, with the crappy 1.5Mbs DSL I have at my house, I can pretty much extend it out to my shop with two Dixie cups and some string... :rofl
    #31
  12. nickguzzi

    nickguzzi Long timer

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    Yes, we were there.
    #32
  13. Mini Trail

    Mini Trail n°°b

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    I have the Orbi Pro AC3000 Business Mesh with one of the repeaters in my detached shop and couldn't be happier. It was very easy to set up and it coats the whole property with wifi. It is pricey though.

    In my old house my shop was 100' out as well. I put a repeater in the house window closest to the shop and another router in the shop. The shop router was the only device running off of the repeater and my shop computer & shop tv was only linked to the shop router. The equipment was different brands & different ages but it worked pretty well.
    #33
    showkey likes this.
  14. showkey

    showkey Long timer

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    Costco has the ORBI AC3000 on a $70 instant rebate out the door price $320........that’s base and two satellites.
    #34
  15. Steve_h

    Steve_h Been here awhile

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    You can use any router running DD-WRT as a network bridge back to your regular network. If you use everything in the bridged location plugged into the router, it will perforn NAT and that's all you need. If you want Wi-Fi, you'll need to plug another router into the bridge. But wifi routers are cheap at thrift stores.
    #35
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  16. kcoralj

    kcoralj Been here awhile

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    Wisconsin
    My downstairs neighbor just moved, I used to just give her a few bucks a month for her wifi but now I've got to hook up my own cable modem (actually they sent me one, an Arris)
    There are 4 coax cables on the back of the building, one from the phone box, three in "time Warner" boxes.
    I don't have a tone generator but I think I can handle sorting out the various splitters and garbage running up to my second floor apartment with a jumper and my multi-meter
    How can I determine which is the correct service line?
    Can I just connect the modem and look for the light?
    I suppose I could just spend the fifty bucks to send a tech, but obviously techs are the ones who put the crazy amount of unlabelled lines and splitters all over this place, if I could just sit out back with an extension cord and the modem could I determine if the incoming lines are bad?
    Maybe it doesn't even matter which line I use? I don't know much about the cable type broadband and I'm not sure when the last time these lines were even used.
    #36