Is it time for Change or not?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MATTY, Aug 29, 2021.

  1. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    I am having a senior moment. :lol2 at 63 years old I have had a minor stroke. (Lord only knows what a major stroke is like must be devastating) .
    I have been riding all my life and don't want to give up. But even before the stroke, i did think about trimming down my projects both bike and car.
    Being thee months post stroke in recovery right now, i am thankfully back riding with normal vision now and a weak right hand and leg about the only symptoms at the moment.
    So Now my quandary.
    I do still compete in club level trials, so do my family so not selling any trials bikes. But i have a few road bikes in my humble collection i am considering parting with, i say parting because getting me to part with any bike is like pulling teeth.
    The stroke however did reveal loud aqnd clear to me my mortality, and i started to think about when i die, exactly what i leave behind, that others might not want . And as such my humble road motorcycle crop perhaps needs pruning a little if i am to be responsible.
    The family say its not a problem, they will cross the bridge when they come to it. but stood in the Barn the other night i looked around, and i think i have to move at least some thing.
    So explanations out the way and fully aware it is ultimately my dessication ,i would welcome any thoughts and insight you would be kind enough to share with me here.
    The bikes involved are as follows.
    Triumph trident t150 1970 (four speed)
    two late 1970s IZH planeta sports 350s plus donor/ spares.
    2003 DRZ 400
    1997 Yamaha XT600E
    1993 Kawasaki EN500A3 (bobber)
    1996 Triumph Trophy 900 (Sprint lookalike build)
    1995 Yamaha XJ900 Rat cafe fighter build (running but currently stripped for paint
    2016 Triumph tiger 800 XCX
    2014 China lifan king 14f water cooled 125 ( cruiser Project build) dont ask me why i own that 125.

    The Last two project bikes would be easy to part with but, the rest not so much. The T150 trident is staying as is the TWO IZH planeta sports, I think the old 900 Sprophy buid must stay and the XT600e. the kawasaki 500 i am curently enjoying riding in my infirm condition. and although i have not much affinity with the 2016 tiger 800, its an ok bike and my newest one.
    What to do, i know its my dessication . but i need some prompting common sense on what to do. please. ideas on a postcard . :lol2
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  2. Meriden

    Meriden Yea whatever

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    No health problems, but at 62 I'm trying to clear my stable as well. Bottom line for me... I'm keeping my trials bike because I think I can get some use out of it, as well maintaining my balance skills. I'm keeping my 1970 Triumph TR6R 650 because I've had it since I was 19 and I have the space. I'm selling my BMW X Challenge, BMW RT, and probably an RD400 Daytona project. My dad died a couple of weeks ago and I'm cleaning up his estate. Thankfully he left pretty much nothing that I need to sell. No one in my family is going to want any of my bikes when I pass away so why punish them with weeks of work getting rid of my crap? Honestly I can keep myself busy with the Tiger and my antique XJ6. They will be better maintained since my attention isn't divided between so many projects. Sometimes less is more. I can look back over my life and remember bikes or cars I wish I had today, but I've never regretted selling any of them. My $.02 on a similar situation. Best of luck.
    m
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  3. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious Supporter

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    I was in a bar the other night, an the bartender was a friendly young guy and we got to talking about motorcycles. Turns out his dad had left him and his brother 2 project motorcycles. When I found out what they were I kept smiling and nodding but inside I was SMH. Two old CB 360s.:( I would only leave the cream of the crop and make sure they are in top condition.,
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  4. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    Thanks for contributing here. I do see change could have a positive aspect to it.
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  5. JETalmage

    JETalmage Long timer

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    Frankly, I'd sell off all that stuff (except the Trials bikes you actually ride) and buy a new Kawasaki W800. (Yeah, 'cause that's my current passion. ;-)

    But seriously; I know we're all different and it's hard to give up those things we've become nostalgic about. Nonetheless, all those 'when I get around to it' half-baked projects and trophies impose their own kind of nagging stress we carry around with us all the time.

    It's taken 67 years so far for me to learn and I still struggle with it; but there's a freeing and soothing relief that comes surprisingly quickly after getting rid of even some of the 'most prized' stale keepsakes. There's a youthful exuberance in seeing just the two or three pristine bikes that you actually ride surrounded in the garage by the breathing room (both physical and mental) they and you deserve.

    The Wife and I are determinedly in the process of simplifying possessions. I've never been one to have a plethora of 'project' motorcycles, but it's still a struggle. As a lifetime illustrator, I have a ridiculous amount of clutter in my studio. Old, but still functional Macintosh computers. SCSI cables. Palm devices. Zip drives and SyQuest drives full of client projects. Books on Flashscript, Hypercard, PHP. Airbrushes and all the paraphernalia that accompanies them. A massive steel mechanical drafting table with a track-drafter attached. Then there's the 'archives'--physical paintings and drawings and print samples of brochures, catalogs, book covers, posters, ads, identity and product logos I've done. But truth be told, I never even look at that stuff these days.

    So it's a struggle. But every time I force myself to get rid of another boxful, the next day there's the relief of "Why did I hang onto that for so dang long?"

    Back to motorcycles:

    I can relate. My own "most recent one" was the 2019 790 Adventure. No doubt many think I'm nuts, but that's the bike I just never gelled with. Its annoyances were subtly and slowly eating away at my pleasure of riding. But it was paid for. It was in pristine shape. I had spent way too much on junk to make it more likeable. It was supposed to be a 'great breakthrough bike'. It would be crazy to get rid of it, right?

    Well, when I finally got tired of being weirdly haunted by the W and bought one in April, I kept the 790, justifying its redundancy by its being my 'Adventure Bike'. And it sat there occupying space in the garage, fully ready to ride, while I found myself putting a steady 2000 miles per month on the elegantly humble W.

    After about 6 weeks, I figured the W was probably not an aberration of short-term impulse. I decided to put the 790 on consignment at the dealership where I bought it. But in this upside-down time of dealers needing all the bikes they can get, they offered to buy it back from me at very near my intended selling price. And a nagging, pressing weight just lifted off my shoulders. Rarely have I been so glad to be rid of a bike.

    So at almost 5 months since purchase, the W presently has 9500 miles on it--and counting.

    So my advice: Let it go. Make yourself do it. And regain some invaluable youth in the process. Nothing wrong with being a new and current and refreshed old guy.

    JET
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  6. TripleTriples

    TripleTriples Long timer

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    I'll add a counter point here.

    Sell the ones that are 'easy' to part with first, then re-evaluate the rest. Nothing in that list would be difficult for your family to sell if they had to, and they'd pocket plenty of cash.

    There's nothing wrong with keeping a stable of bikes around that you enjoy, even if they only get ridden once a year.
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  7. JETalmage

    JETalmage Long timer

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    Assuming Matty's family knows how to. I dare say Matty probably has more contacts and possesses more how-to in that regard, and would enjoy the process more. So he can spare the family the chore, pocket more cash for the effort in the here-and-now, and either use it for something fresh and not encumbered by a nagging 'disposal duty' cloud hanging over it—or just put it in the bank for the family to effortlessly inherit, if he prefers to think himself dead already. ;-)

    I don't presume to tell anyone what to do with his life. Young or old, any of us can die tomorrow, if we survive today. Nor am I dogmatic about it; balance is wise, and people are different. That said, I'd just rather continue living here-and-now with some vibrancy than leave behind an unfinished dusty-rusty 'museum' memorial to myself.

    JET
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  8. markk53

    markk53 jack of all trades... Super Supporter

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    @MATTY if part of the reason for moving bikes out is weak right grip you could consider putting a higher leverage master cylinder on the front brake. Reduced effort, with a bit more lever travel. Usually it involves going to a smaller piston master cylinder, but in cases where the mechanical leverage of the actual lever, the piston may be larger. I helped research this for a rider wanting stronger brakes to compensate for weaker grip and an email to Brembo got him the recommended set up to do the job.

    Otherwise I'd decide if the project or bike is still fun. If so, don't sell it.
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  9. Knapper-UK

    Knapper-UK Been here awhile

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    I'd sell the lot (except the trials bikes and the Trident - everyone needs a classic to tinker with). If you don't want tall, heavy, big and bonkers fast but still want to enjoy very decent highway performance in a manageable package, get a Triumph 1200 Speed Twin. Compact, simple, physically manageable but still with ample performance, oodles of retro charm and all the stress-free benefits and reliability of modern engineering.
    #9
  10. BetterLateThanNever

    BetterLateThanNever Nice, until you're not.

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    First, I'm sorry for what you've gone through, but glad you're on the mend.

    If it's any help to know this, I'm the same age as you and am having the same urge to simplify things, despite not having any kind of Road to Damascus moment. Maybe it's just time for a zennier (is that a word?) life, and maybe that doesn't have as much to do with your health as you suspect it does.

    Especially since Covid, I've found myself expecting everything I have - including some friendships - to requalify or get the hook. Stuff you don't care about takes up space that would otherwise make room for possibility.
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  11. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    Great input here thanks all, and much to think about, and might i add very apt relevant insight.
    I dont want to rush into anything right now, but several of you have touched on my attitude i feel i need a simplification a peacefulness if you like. strange term because i am not feeling any stress as such, but i think the stark realisation of mortality is lurking somewhere under the surface somewhere , but there is going to be a change I will mull over the situation for a wile yet i have no desire as the old saying goes act in haste repent at leisure. Ok i know its wed in haste, but i think you get my drift. :lol2
    #11
  12. AdventureTrail

    AdventureTrail Alex

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    So I think there's a couple parts to this.

    I'd sell any bikes that are "easy" to part with. Hell, with that mindset they're halfway out the door already. I'd spend some time riding the rest and decide what your actual wants are from a bike (or bikes) and keep those. Life is too short to hold on to projects that you don't have the passion for. Your most precious commodity is, and will always be, your time. Don't waste it on things that don't add something to your life or make you happy.

    The second part.

    I'm glad that you're doing better. When you have time, and you're in the right mindset, it could be worthwhile to start making plans for what you want to happen when you're gone if you haven't done so already. I have a good friend who has mutual hobbies and interests who has promised to help my wife sell unneeded/unwanted stuff of mine when I go. It's some peace of mind that my wife won't have to share all of that alone.

    Just some thoughts. Once again, glad you're doing better.
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  13. rwf

    rwf Been here awhile

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    My wife knows which friend to put in charge of all bike maters. I’ve spent my life doing things because I think I should. I wouldn’t part with a bike unless I really wanted to.
    #13
  14. gateman

    gateman Long timer

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    Wow you have a fleet to sort through.
    Just a thought on how you may sort the crop.
    Matty those bikes which now feel easier or offer more comfort to live with might be the better to keep. Think physical ability/comfort as a selection criteria.

    I had a stroke in 2007. It was in 2008 and I bought my first bike then.
    Back at that time pre stroke I was a very competitive and successful pistol shooter and post stroke recognized I would never have the sharp edge needed to win again.
    I sold all my gear. 12 pistols all the presses and 19 years of accumulated treasures. It was a huge step.

    Every so often I have a twinge of regret.
    I love my bikes and my new post stroke self needs the trips away and the comradery of the IBA community and the bikes for me allow a place to grow in.
    Stroke left me no room for advancement in the pistol game.

    It took about 4 years to rewire my brain.

    Good luck with your transition and recovery.
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  15. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    There has been a development, only a small one but its a start and fate i must say lent a hand.
    Gets a phone call from my daughter 7AM this morning. She is working at a retirement home part time while in university. On her way home this morning The Drive chain on her Honda CG125 snapped , in her defence she refitted the chain put a new split link in it and set off home.
    Chain broke again as she was going up her drive at her rental house.
    A few pics from whats app showed the problem, rear sprocket well warn chain ridding up and too much for the link Bang.
    Went down to Newcastle picked her and the CG125 up in the van, The bike neds a chain and sprockets. She has learned there is more to chain maintenance than cleaning and adjustment.
    Wife came out with the idea, what about giving her the DRZ400 as she had liked it for a long time , and t we just need put chain sprockets on her cg125 sell that.
    Needless to say daughter was delighted. so one down and a 125 that will move easy on gumtree or ebay as lerners must have 125s here.
    Just been out checked the DRZ over and she is out on it now, due back for lunch at 1pm and she is home now until her next shift on Friday.
    Just ordered sprocket kit off ebay should be here in the week.
    So one down sort of, i am out of pocket but Daughter is happy so its a positive result in my opinion and anyway she is better off on the 400 than that 125 imo.
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  16. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    You’re three months into recovery from a stroke. You are nowhere near done. I’d suggest holding off until next year, when you’ll have a better picture of how you’ll be doing.

    Putter and play the rest of the year, and through the winter. Come spring, you’ll have a clearer vision.
    #16
  17. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    Thanks and i do realise that, its early days yet, and i am in no rush to move anything on just yet. Ok the DRZ but its the right thing to do.
    To sell something like say the 800 tiger for example, is too much at moment. i am far from sure how i feel and why i am asking for input here. a problem shared as they say/ two heads are better than one.
    The recovery as been good so far, i am not as physically blessed with stamina as i would like, but living is a huge bonus so i am not grumbling one bit.
    Input from here friends and family over the coming months will colour my decisions . I Kind of have been hankering after a
    CCM spitfire
    [​IMG]
    and i might just let my tiger and the trident go, but then again i might just bank the money. My mate andy was here last night and his exact words were Laughing " Hell are you planning on croaking or something, i know what you are like and you will be bleating about selling bikes for years to come. You never shut up about that suzuki GS1100E you sold in what? 1987 was it? " And i must admit he has a point. :lol2
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  18. Chotu

    Chotu Lifan x-pect

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    I just had the widow maker heart attack in April.

    I have asked similar questions to yours because I had the same “wow, I can die?!?” realization.

    The best advice I got was to DO NOTHING.

    Do not make any decisions like this for months or even a year after the event. Your mind will go through different stages and start to return to normal thinking. Don’t decide any of this until you’re thinking how you used to.

    These are emotionally driven decisions. You’re making them based on the mortality emotion. But guess what? You could always have died. Car accident, bus hits you, etc.

    It’s just now the death thing is stuck in your head even subconsciously. Let it drift away over a long period of time and then go look at this idea of parting with some bikes.

    Your family is probably right too. They can deal with selling some bikes later if you’re gone and they don’t want them. But you’ll be around for many more years. Especially with the drugs you’re probably on to keep things running smoothly.
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  19. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    Glad you are ok, And i agree the realisation is well very real. And as i said earlier i wont be rushing into anything far a wile.
    I do like the idea of freeing up some money, but although i am not made of money i don't really need it. I asked this question is it time for change or not , and only too aware its only me that can make that choice.
    Interesting many have similar thoughts and hearing how they have come to terms with this aspect of life is thought provoking and helpful.
    I know i have some bikes i will not part with . the IZH Planeta sports are staying until i die, too much fun to ride too rare in uk and not worth much in the bigger scheme of things. My yamaha XT600e too i go back too far with that bike, at the moment my head is telling me to keep the trident but not my heart. I feel similar about the tiger 800, i have the tiger taxed and on the road i think i need to get some miles on it whilst the weather is still ok. Time will tell.
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  20. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    You can find some similar ruminations in the various TBI/concussion threads. Similar to a stroke, dealing with a damaged brain and a body that doesn’t work right any longer.

    Fwiw, I was off the bike for a year. As I started riding again I went on a mildly challenging ride with a friend. Part of that was to have him evaluate me and my riding. I didn’t trust my own perspective.

    That said, things change. Age, weather, location, boredom, etc. I’ll be selling two bikes, because I just don’t ride them. Thinking about selling the Harley, which is really odd. But this year, I really didn’t enjoy riding it. It’s huge and heavy, and this year it was unpleasantly so. That’s a big part of why I bought the Guzzi V50. It’s less than half the size and weight of the Harley.
    #20
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