Is it time for Change or not?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MATTY, Aug 29, 2021.

  1. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    Well I have not two hours ago sold my Triumph Tiger 800 XCX 2016 to a friend from East Lothian. I met up with him last week for a ride over to the Mull of Galoway We often ride out over that way or down into Yorkshire . He had a ride on the tiger i rode his GSXR 1000 streetfighter, and he happened to mention if i ever wanted to sell it to let him know.
    It did not sink in at first, but over the weekend i started to think about letting it go more. I mentioned it to the wife, she said It was my choice and only if i was sure. I went out this AM Shooting geese on the firth and met My mate walking off the shore. We talked Shooting and conversation back at the cars turned to the tiger, I was so luke warm about selling it, i told him to make me an offer, and despite him repeatedly asking what price i had in mind, i left it with him.
    He rang me at lunchtime and his offer was more than i wanted and actually only £70 less than i paid for it 3 years ago. I Accepted his offer and he agreed to collect it over the weekend. Two hours latter he rang up asked if he could pick it up today, as his wife could drive him down as she was home from work early.
    hour latter he is off back over the border on my / his tiger.
    I feel neutral about the bikes going, and although i admit it was not my intention move it s quick as i have, the space from the DRZ and the tiger is noticeable in the container where i store the bikes.
    I dont think i wat to part with anything else though, It was my newest bike and although i enjoyed it i never really took it to heart somehow, which is strange its a Triumph, and me and triumph go back to my road bike beginning when i got a a daytona 500 and a tiger 90 350 at 17. And to add to that last statement, the tiger 800 did ouse character something i feel is lacking in many newer bikes. Ok I know thats my view on charecter in a bike but i believe it to be so.
    #21
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  2. steingar

    steingar higher life form

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    I think the happiest time of my life was when everything I owned including my motorcycle fit in the back of a tiny little pickup truck.
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  3. Gone in 60

    Gone in 60 Been here awhile

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    Matty, glad to hear that you're getting better. As for the Triumph, as you said, you didn't really take it to heart, making parting ways with it less difficult emotionally. I love my bikes, and initially never think I can get rid of them, but things do happen. I thought I'd never sell my R1200R and put many happy miles on it. But, when it started having one electronic issue after another, I felt like it was betraying me somehow and all I felt was relief when I sold it. There's a BMW magnet still stuck to the refrigerator, and my wife sometimes asks if I miss that bike. "Someone else's problem now, hun."
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  4. FW190Pilot

    FW190Pilot Adventurer

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    THIS^^^^^^
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  5. Sal Pairadice

    Sal Pairadice Captain Obvious Supporter

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    I just can't get over the awesomeness of going out shooting geese on the shore and running into my buddy who buys my bike,

    An old friend of mine is an excellent rider and also the kid who appreciates character bikes such as BMWs and Ducatis. He bought a Tiger 800 and has been nothing but happy with it the last 5 years.
    #25
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  6. panhead_dan

    panhead_dan This aint jo daddy's Grundle.

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    Matty,
    We will all go through the things you are contemplating, if we are fortunate. It's difficult to do the right thing because we sometimes loose sight of just exactly what that thing is. Think about it- will selling your bikes make you happier? Will selling any of them make you happier? What will make you happier? The point to this life is to be happy, my friend.
    Go buy another bike. That always makes me happier! Live out your life happy and driving people crazy, man. Even when the day comes that you can't ride anymore. Let someone else worry about the bikes after you are done and gone.

    This one looks pretty good to me!
    [​IMG]
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  7. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    Seems to me you already answered your own question, at least partly. If it's not something you currently enjoy riding or a project you are actively working on (and enjoying doing it), sell it! Seems to me you have several bikes that compete for the same spectrum of dualsport use so prune out all but one - The DRZ and Tiger could go (Tiger also overlaps with the Trophy.) You already said the projects could go - and I don't know why you have a Lifan 125 either. I'd also ask why you need the whole slew of Planeta stuff? Maybe keep the best one and sell on the other and the spares to another enthusiast.

    You might find the time and space freed up quite liberating and it will allow you to focus on sorting and streamlining some other stuff instead of spending time on "projects" you're not that into any more.

    That said, there's no great rush. Why not try selling one that you KNOW you won't miss, then forget about it for a while - If in three or four months you are not regretting it, see how you feel about the next one.

    EDIT: Reading the rest of the thread, I see you are already a couple of steps ahead of me. I was going to suggest that selling/giving a bike you have cherished to someone you know is going to appreciate it is a lot easier than just posting it in the classifieds.
    #27
  8. Ray916MN

    Ray916MN Dim Mak

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    I'm 62. About 10 years ago, I could see my riding would change as I grew older. I would no longer be able to ride as hard, far, or fast as I used to. A lot of the folks I ride with are older than me and I could see what happened to them. Death, disease, waning strength and aptitude, riding one day, no longer able to ride the next day. I made a decision to begin to collect motorcycles because I not only love riding them, I love the design and technology of them. I decided to collect them while I could still ride them fairly well, knowing that as I got older I would transition more to the bench racing and kickstand event side of motorcycling. I bought an Aprilia RS250 a bike a buddy of mine who is about 10 years older than me had always lusted after. He has never lacked for money, but always put off buying one because it was too irrational. As soon as I got it, I went over to his place to let him ride it. He went about 30 ft, stopped and got off. Said the seating position was too much for him. His opportunity to ride something he always wanted to had passed.

    So now at 62, I have a nice collection and every time I go for a ride it is on something special. Today it was a ride on this.

    Desmosedici.jpg

    My days of taking on project bikes is ending and I'm focusing on riding my collection. Not riding as hard or far or fast as I used to, but the bikes I'm riding make every ride special. When you have fewer rides left in your life they should all be as special as possible.

    I don't think the phase you're in means shrinking what you own. I think it means selling the mundane and buying the superlative. Your opportunity to ride is always slipping away. You'll have plenty of time to sell stuff after you can no longer ride and the better the stuff you have the easier it will be to sell.

    Best of luck with your recovery and with whatever you choose to do.
    #28
  9. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    I feel i have moved a couple of bikes that although i liked them, they are not missed. The DRZ was bought cheap in terrible condition off a farm smoking. I Spent a lot of time on it and it turned out nice. Glad my daughter ended up with it. I dont see anything else going certainly not soon anyway.
    The yamaha XJ900f project bike i crashed on, i now am quite motivated to reconfigure. I have a 95 Diversion frame log book and FZ 1000 wheels and a few other bits i want to build into possibly a chain driven XJ900 Brat / fighter thing. :lol2 I am more enjoying the technical aspects of making a shaft to run the sprocket and a outer support housing than any aesthetic aspects of the build right now. in fact i just bought a stock diversion 9 tank today for the build, having spent two days fabricating a butchered trophy upper fuel tank section and a flat base, which looked just wrong.
    I felt i was getting bogged down with trivia, and needed to get into the machining part of the build rather than appearance at this stage.
    I am acctualy enjoying planning the build, now i got on and stripped the spare engine, so i know what i am looking at now in the XJ9 engine. In fact i think the humble yamaha 900 four is an underrated engine, ok its no powerhouse as such but smooth and simple.
    Re the planeta spares? I need to keep all that stuff the IZH parts situation for the sport model is not ideal, and in the UK finding parts is near impossible, I like the IZH ride too much to let them go.
    The Lifan 125 king cruiser? :lol2 it needs to get photographed and put on fleabay of Local faceache marketplace, i need to get this done. .
    #29
  10. zeerx

    zeerx Long timer

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    It’s not difficult to part with a bike(s) when properly motivated. After a crash this spring which resulted in me getting some neck vertebrae fused, the DRZ, KZ and ZRX were gone in five weeks. I can’t take the chance.
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  11. Rider2

    Rider2 Been here awhile Supporter

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    This has been an enlightening thread for me. I'm 68 and just came back from a 3 month, 24,000 mile, 44 state ride. Not nearly as enjoyable as in past years, and the GSA seems so much bigger this time than when I did essentially the same trip before. The bike is a 2020 and is great but I'm just not feeling it like I did the 2016 GSA. Can't decide whether to downsize or hang up my helmet altogether. If I downsize that will probably be the end of long trips, OTOH I would gladly skip riding Coast to coast across the great plains again, 8 times is enough!
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  12. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    Even before the deer hit and ultimately my minor stroke, I / We had long since given up two up bike touring. if i go off on a bike now i am alone or in company of friends, but if i am touring with the wife we use open sports car/ kit cars. have a 88 marlin roadster (trials car build) We use, and have had caterham seven/ locost builds mostly with ford 4 cylinder in them of various types.
    I simply never got the big heavy ADV bike deal at all, and if anything other than minimalist touring i would use the car of some kind.
    you could use any car i suppose, but reason went with kit cars was they are light fast nimble, and basic in nature and largely open to the elements. And yet they have way more weather protection should you need it.
    if you get tired, you are sat in a comfly seat you are not sat on the grass or a rock at the roadside.
    Big pluss is you can carry lots of gear even basic parts, and the car remains unafected handling wise, Ok well thought out bike luggage can be get by just fine . But with the kit car you can take more stuff, without resorting to the roof top 4x4 type racks. simple rear rack and under rear bodywork storage is both secure and practical and i much favour this approach to touring.
    Ok i admit, any tight off roading is impractical, but in the case of the marlin roadster trials cars you have a reasonable off road capability probably surpasing a large touring bike quite easily. (google clasic car trials marlin roadster for what these cars can do, its not 4x4 stuff but its not pavement either and gravel tracks no problem) .
    We did a trip to the alp's two years ago, more or less mirroring what we had done in the 70s and 80s before we had the kids, In the marlin,. We once got sought in a down pour on a trident in 1979 near a place called Gap. Slept under a fly sheet at the side of the bike, the wife cried that night. Ok we were young and learning then but. if we had been in a lotus seven we would have at least been off the ground and with a soft top roof for protection.
    I am not here to deride bikes, just pointing our MY/ OUR long term feelings and thoughts on minimalist kit cars as ADV ish transport and yet retain the outdoor connection the bikes offer in a practical way yet with undoubted performance handling just the same.
    #32
  13. Pantah

    Pantah Jiggy Dog Fan Supporter

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    I am 72. The last big ride I did was the 2018 Alcan5000 TSD rally aboard my 2012 KTM 690R. The prior year I rode my 2016 Honda Africa Twin from Boston to Scottsdale were I retired to. That trip was 2017. In 2019 I bought pristine 2007 Ducati Monster S2R 1000. In prior years I've ridden coast/coast many times. Mostly on a 2004 KTM 950 Adv that I put 70k miles on. In fact I rode it in the 2006 Alcan 5000 and also in 2010. In 2011 I rode the Continental Divide Ride from Canada to Mexico aboard a Yamaha Wr250r.

    I think its all coming to and end, though. I rarely rode at all since the Pandemic began. Maybe 2 or 3 half day trips on either my KTM on Arizona dirt roads, or my Africa Twin into the high country. I've ridden my two Ducatis only enough to keep the motors healthy. I'd like to sell the Africa Twin, the KTM and my 1998 Ducati SS900 FE. But my kids want that Ducati and the other two bikes are probably not worth much. I like looking at them, though!

    I have a few typical health issues for a man my age, but I have a top cardiologist and primary care. They have scanned my heart, lungs and arteries and everything seems to be good if I take my meds. So I think the reason I am fading on my life-long relationship with motorcycles; is a rising concern over riding in the street and being taken out. Also I fell off my KTM in the dirt a little over a year ago. Had I not had a friend riding with me, I may have never gotten out of there. It was on a remote Utah trail north of Moab. And I hurt over it too!

    I think if I was Matty and recovering from a stroke, I'd be done with motorcycling for sure. I might keep a few special bikes but probably unload most. I only have one riding buddy left. We went to grammar school together and have ridden together most of our lives. We live 700 miles apart but we usually meet somewhere out west and ride together for a few days. He's still into it but he DID mention the possibility of a side-by-side the other night. The rest of my riding buddies quit years ago or have even passed.

    IMG_4427 (1).jpeg
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  14. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    Deciding what you need to move on to someone else is a complex choice, and precisely why i started this thread.
    I knew i had or at least felt i had to trim the flock somewhat. although those around me did not see the need. I am glad things have turned out the way they have, the daughter with the DRZ 400 was a case of fate lending a hand really. And because i brought that bike back from the dead too spending way too much time on it, i feel my contribution is shared with my daughter rather than an outsider gaining from purchasing it.
    Again the tiger i got it from my nephew who moved to NZ i borrowed it long term, and got it after two years at a bargain price, its gone to an old friend so i feel content. I think thats part of it, the emotion , that connection that you have with a bike, that is so sad to see diluted to just cold hard cash.
    My stroke? ME? I could no easier give up Bikes than i could waterfowling, That is Me, what i am. Bikes were always there for me, to jump on get some space escape what was happening. I had an instant adrenaline injection when i needed one. The feeling of being lifted after that perfect string of curves you went round never grew old for me, i am so glad i can still physically do this after recent events. To walk out on it all now. for me would be plain wrong.
    Strange as it may seem, waterfowling has a stronger than any other drive in my life. My love of it stems from family connections historically, and My involvement in the sport from childhood both here and in Nz never went away. Its the whole thing The wild places the lonely areas the weather the tradition, and the Dog/ man working together aspect in adverse conditions where both need each other. ( i hunt shores not fields) .
    in a way i feel there is a similarity with motorcycling, you are alone in beautiful wild places probably at a time of day the rest of the sane world is fast asleep. I tend to travel to the coastal grounds early morning in the off season, watch the geese massing and ready to leave for Scandinavia in the spring. Same with the autumn migration i use a bike to scout if you like. But i see the connection in my world and wont give either up until i am absolutely forced to by insurmountable complications in my health or death itself.
    I actually see my life style choices, as health strong motivators to live eat healthy and a good form of outdoor exercise, which i see as a good positive thing.
    Whatever anyone needs to do, is your c. hoice, we are all different with different requirements and i think we all must go with our instincts, but the wealth of info shared by others here have insight you dont always recognise yourself, and this is precisely why its good to talk.
    #34
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  15. JETalmage

    JETalmage Long timer

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    Oh, I can relate. Through most of my life, I've daydreamed about using what we on this side of the pond called 'rail dune buggies'--tubular frames powered by an air-cooled VW Beetle engine in the rear--as my primary car. Sadly, their days of near universal proliferation here are over. One in good shape occasionally shows up for sale around here in middle Georgia, but I don't want to be dinking around with an obsolete engine with breaker points, etc.

    It seems to me the same thing powered by a GoldWing engine would be the bee's knees. But nowadays, innovation is too entangled in nanny-state regulation. Polaris had to resort to 3 wheels to work around that. Were Polaris to build a 'dualsport' version of the Slingshot, I'd be all over it.

    But the vehicle bureaucracy here has long been as schizophrenic, self-contradictory, hypocritical, and absurd as the current (hopefully anomalous) political 'administration'. In some States, the Slingshot is considered a car. In other States, it's a motorcycle, and therefore subject to helmet laws.

    Meanwhile, off-road 'side-by-sides' have become all the rage (and a mainstay essential to mainstream motorcycle dealerships). They've become as large as jeeps, but cannot be tagged for on-road use. Yet because they are so popular, some local governments are allowing them to be used as cars in residential areas--even while still disallowing non-street-legal trail bikes to be likewise used and allowing bicycles to have free public roadway range short only of major highways.

    It's downright shameful that we have allowed entrenched bureaucracies to become so tyrannical that they are not even held to common-sense logical consistency.

    Anyway, that's why for decades now my 'touring car' is the closest practically-common thing to an open-air rail dune buggy substitute: a no-frills, base model soft-top Jeep. It's my multi-mode 'convertible' when I want it to be. I can just lift the soft door window frames out and have low doors open to elbow level. Or remove the whole doors to be open to the door thresholds. I can remove the side and rear window panels while leaving the top up for shade. Or remove the whole doors, fold the whole top down, and even fold down the windshield for maximum openness.

    Of course, it's suitable for not just dirt or gravel roads, but actual trails. I drive it as deep as I want into my woods to do some target shooting. It carries my Trials bike like carrying a Jerry can. It carries our kayaks on the stainless tubular rack above the roof. Hauls the utility trailer for everything from multiple dirt bikes to building supplies. It used to haul and launch our sailboats.

    I've used it as a painting scaffold; to pull dead trees down; to drag logs around the property....

    More practical than most think, and much more fun than a truck.

    JET
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  16. JETalmage

    JETalmage Long timer

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    Disclaimer: We're all different. So are our injuries. I'm NOT a doctor. We have to make our own decisions, and I don't presume to give you advice.

    That said, knowing nothing more about your situation than what you stated above, my story may give, if not you, someone facing surgery a bit more hopeful outlook:

    My neck fusion was in 2012. The only relation it had to any 'crash' was this: A few years prior, I had gotten sloppy on a near-vertical downhill on my Trials bike. So when the rear tire bumped over a small root, over the bars I went, landing sharply on my right shoulder. Hurt like crazy. My riding bud had to recover my bike as I hobbled back to the trucks. Went to the local Med Stop. Had X-ray. Doc said I'd stretched ligaments, but "...we don't fix these things unless you're a football star or something."

    In 2012, that pain had started recurring, so I went to have it checked. Waiting to meet the doctor in the exam room, I noticed the walls were adorned with not only the usual medical posters, but as many framed photos of stock race car drivers.

    I related the shoulder injury. After a few pokes and prods, to my utter shock, the doc said, "That's not your shoulder. It's your neck." I thought he was nuts. He said "I'll give you a cortisone shot, but you'll see." Of course the MRI proved him correct. It was arthritis that had choked my spinal cord down to what he described after surgery as "a ribbon."

    I feared my riding days were over. When doing the pre-op paperwork, the attendant, a very pleasant, petite lady older than I, mentioned that she had had a neck fusion. Later in the conversation, it came up that she was a rider, and would soon be replacing her current Harley with a new Fat Boy. Shocked again, I quizzed her:

    "You're still riding after neck fusion surgery?!"
    "Sure!"

    "Can you turn your neck to check traffic over your shoulder?!"
    "Sure!" and demoed.

    Needless to say, that conversation was a godsend of pre-op hope.

    I had just bought a new 2012 DR650. Long story short, through the months of recovery, I fully complied with instructions. I guess about nine months or so later (don't really recall how long), at the last post-op check before being released, I asked the doc about riding. With the requisite hint of a doctor's general motorcycle caution in his tone, he smiled and said "Live your life, James. If you do something that breaks your neck, it won't be where I fixed it."

    After by-the-book 'full recovery', I distinctly remember my first very trepidatious 'test excursion' off the pavement onto a grassy shoulder. Up on the pegs, easy careful pace. Fully watchful for any minor bump, the front wheel instead dipped down into a small depression hidden in the grass. Man, just that little jolt hurt like you-know-what!

    But over the next few months, I was gradually but fully back to normal as far as riding was concerned. It's been several ADV bikes, Dualsports, and even Trials bikes since then. I'm riding as much as ever, and literally don't even think about the neck anymore, except in conversations like this.

    Yes, I was blessed at every step along the way, and no, I can't speak for anyone but myself. And my heart goes out to anyone less fortunate. But I'm certainly not the only one fully back to riding after vertebrae fusion.

    I'll tell ya this, though: Even though it really had nothing to do with my neck, I dang sure don't get sloppy on steep downhills on the Trials bike anymore. ;-)

    JET
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  17. zeerx

    zeerx Long timer

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    ^^^^^^^^^ Good on you. I’ll give you credit for getting back out there.

    Full disclosure: six or eight years ago I was told the same thing.......the shoulder pain was your neck not your shoulder. Neurosurgeon was keeping an eye on it. Probably from hockey.

    Fast forward to last spring. At my crash I was laying in the dirt numb and unable to move from the neck down for 10 minutes. Scariest thing I had experienced in my life. So after an ambulance ride, a Med flight and 3 weeks in the hospital I finally learned to walk and function again.

    Riding since 1968 so I figure I had a good run. Time to hang it up. Be careful out there JET.
    #37
  18. MATTY

    MATTY BORDER RAIDER

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    The Lifan King 125 cruiser went on facebook market place, What a waste of time that was, if your selling Chinese junk get ready for the messengers from hell, will i take a px on a £200 bike, more questions about location than the bike. I cried shy in the end posted it sold. I figured the kind of characters enquiring, on our place would end up costing us dearly in potential unwelcome visitor trouble. I stashed it out back in a wooden shed with two old lawn mowers i chained it to . out of sight out of mind for now.
    I am Currently building the project Mongrel hybrid XJ900 yamaha XJ900 But not going chain staying with the shaft drive but twin shock conversion on the diversion XJ900 s frame this time.
    I am glad i did not rush into selling this project, i initially wanted it gone, but that was then, i feel i want to work keep me active this winters nights, plan is to get it ready for the spring, Looking at a bare bones naked fighter scramblerish type vibe to it.
    In just a few short weeks, i feel my stamina is improving, although some days it is clear i have over stepped the mark, i do need my sleep a full 8 hours. If i go on less i seem to get tired much quicker. I know all f us are different, but I think i need to Little projects, to focus my mind. i am quite sure that if i was just stagnant in my Bike and car World, i just could start mopeing about my weak right arm and what has happened to me.
    I went to a medical appointment, where the second heart monitoring showed i am fine in the heart area, but in the waiting room, a chap was talking to me and he was not doing very well at all from what i could tell. He was so down about his condition , he was Walking fine and apart from a slurred speech he seemed fine , but boy was he down about his fate.
    I tried to encourage him a little, but he just was in the doom and like he could not or did not want to climb out of it somehow. I do feel my activities help focus me, and the whole bike thing, after seeing mates die etc , i think you get to accept no one is going to live forever and just get on with it.
    but i must reiterate we are all different, and i suppose cope with or handle things quite differently to each other.
    #38
  19. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I don't usually deal much on FBM or Craigslist, etc. but I've done enough to figure out the more obvious pitfalls. Sold an old Korean bike I had put a different engine in and had a similar experience to you. Prospective buyers seemed like mostly kids with zero clue, thinking they could pick up a fully operational bike for peanuts. This one actually started easily and was rideable but had the entire charging system removed and needed a chain & sprockets and this was all stated in the ad. It didn't deter dozens of flaky buyers wanting to know if it was street legal, asking if I'd take $50 per week or trade for a gaming system, etc., etc. Of the first couple who actually showed up, one arrived two hours late and thought he could get it in the back of his car. He then panicked when I started talking about taking the wheels off and he'd have to put them back on himself - turned out he owned no tools. I gave him his money back and told him to get lost. The second one showed up two hours late and announced he had only brought 3/4 of the agreed price. Fortunately the next person was more enlightened and knew what he was buying. There doesn't seem to be the same problem with cheap lawn mowers, etc. but cheap motorcycles bring out the idiots and time-wasters.

    Clearly stating in your ad, exactly how you want the transaction to go - e.g. "£400 cash, NO OFFERS, NO HAGGLING, NO TRADES, NO TYRE KICKERS, BUYER COLLECTS" then simply ignoring and blocking anyone who suggests anything different, has made things a lot easier for me. However, if you are completely put off selling it yourself, I suggest you wait until you find someone you know and trust, who is willing to deal with the BS and offer them a big cut to sell it for you - otherwise it will stay chained to the mowers until it rusts into the ground.

    Good luck with the ongoing recovery. The daily improvements will get smaller and smaller but you will continue improving, especially if you keep doing what the medical professionals have told you to do diet and exercise-wise.
    #39
  20. doc moses

    doc moses fearlessly flatulent

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    Good good good thread. Thank you Matty for starting this. Nothing I can say that hasnt been said, I feel as if I sat in on a conversation that was made for the questions I have about hanging on to the bikes I mostly just look at. I sold three PC 800s last week (two were mine, one was my wife’s) and that still feels so good!
    #40
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