Is Mexico Safe?

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Arte, Feb 1, 2010.

  1. knight

    knight Long timer

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    A few months ago in BCS Mexico, immigration officials set up a makeshift check point on the hwy, checking gringos for documentation
    They then began setting up checkpoints twice a month, now they have been setting up check points twice a week , including one in front
    of the Chedraui on the main drag through town

    They dont ask to see your FMM , they ask for your passport , and input your PP number into a handheld device to determine your status

    A couple friends who are also ex pats , were stopped and then accompanied 10 miles home, then back to the checkpoint by the police, in order to retrieve their forgotten passports

    The cost of applying for a 4 year temporary residence in BCS is $13,129 pesos , which incudes payment of the fine for having an expired FMM

    I was issued a 4yr TR , despite having an expired FMM that was issued during the humanitarian amnesty period in Mexico

    Another friend was denied applying for TR , because his FMM does not expire until next month
    Ohio_Danimal, Grynch, Cal and 2 others like this.
  2. Animo

    Animo Been n00b awhile Supporter

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    It’s great you were able to take advantage of the new rule. Who knows how long they will allow people to do that. I think it may be short lived.
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  3. Grynch

    Grynch Long timer

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    !!!APB Warning!!!!

    Suspect was last seen at the Overland Expo West Moto Party, last Saturday night in Flagstaff, AZ.

    AKA: Skizzman. Suspect was last seen slightly inebriated and heading for the Mexican border. Approach suspect with extreme caution.
    Accomplices Rad n Doc are following close behind on the yellow BMW hack.

    Rumor has it they will be heading to Batopilas for some Pulque.


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  4. Grynch

    Grynch Long timer

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    Overland Expo West

    IMG_20210925_131048.jpg IMG_20210925_131058.jpg IMG_20210925_101142.jpg IMG_20210925_100648.jpg IMG_20210924_103930.jpg
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  5. Grynch

    Grynch Long timer

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    With a temporary residence you still need to reissue every year . After four years you need to apply for a permanent.
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  6. JuddS

    JuddS Been here awhile Supporter

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    I have a question for you guys who really explire all corners of mexico. I am now in colombia exploring every inchbof this incredible xountry and there is about 40% of the country thst is not under government control. Its controlled by armed guerilla groups who had been fighting the government for 50 years and then 4 years ago the government signed a peace deal with them and agreed not to enter their areas anymore. So, in these areas you really are on your own if you decide to go there. The us state deparment wont allow our people in those areas and the comombian govt csnt go there. If you get kidnapped, you are in real trouble. But, everyone knows where these areas are. When you reach them there sometimes is a fortified outpost with lots of soldiers and you are allowed to cross, but you are crossing into unmonitored territory.

    As long as one respects those boundries, i find it to be a safe country with much less risk of running across some narcos. Do you guys who really know mexico well have an ides of where these "no go" zones are? Ive spent a lot of years in mexico amd traveled it extensively but never really got a good sense of where the no-go zones were. I mean, i know that ive been in juarez a year ago and there were active gun battles between narco groups and thst is not good to be around. I kniw that i rsn into some trouble taking back roads to copper canyone one time and after they verified i didnt work for a cartel or govt, the let me go. But i wouñdnt go back to thst back road as my guess is its an actively controled drug route to the usa.
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  7. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    You appear to already have enough experience in Mexico to be able to “ feel” your way through the situations where security is of concern to you. By and large the concept of” no go zones” is fluid. A place or area may qualify for “ no go” in some weeks but then relax again .A city may experience a period of violence and then revert to a more civilized mode , such as Cd Juarez, Reynosa, Nuevo Laredo. Also the decision as to “ no go “ may differ depending on who issues that warning of “ no go” e.g . US gov . employees are under greater restrictions than ordinary US tourists.

    Many riders go through the Copper Canyon back country area with no real problem ( me too) , as they have often reported here. It is a question of knowing what is going on in a region and what you are comfortable with and acting accordingly . The CC narco issue may be not so much that it is a transit route for drugs but a source region where the crap is grown in isolated pockets and the resulting conflicts over control of that business. If riders know this beforehand and travel through in daylight and mind their own business and not ask awkward questions of or about the illegal operatives then the narco road guards and the national police seem not to mind or care to much that such strange foreigners ride through.
    It is not in their interest for narcos to arouse international bad press coverage by abducting foreign tourists who have no connection to any of their trade.If one is a foreign investigative journalist or gives rise to suspicion that one might be working for some governmental or police agency the situation will become risky .
    Pay attention to the news reports as you travel .
    RJAMT, JuddS, codebot and 3 others like this.
  8. Grynch

    Grynch Long timer

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    In regard to deer strikes in Mexico: I do not see that many, since it is a food source, the Mexicans have consumed a good chunk of the population.

    On the other hand, driving near the Texas/ Mexico border at night, is super dangerous.
    Even interstate 10 for that matter.
    hgulledge likes this.
  9. shiryas

    shiryas Dragon with matches

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    Is it possible to ship tires from US to an address in Mexico?

    I would like to ship some tires for my return trip and do not want to haul them around. I already have the tires and this will $ave some funds, yes I am a cheap inmate.

    - I had read that you can not bring in used tires (unless mounted). Not sure if this is true
    - Also read that new items will be have heavy import duty tax. Not sure if this is true either

    Thanks, Chris
  10. Animo

    Animo Been n00b awhile Supporter

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    It’s fairly expensive and a pain in the a** to import tires, they will be stuck at customs somewhere.

    I would mount the new tires before your trip.
    shiryas likes this.
  11. shiryas

    shiryas Dragon with matches

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    @Animo

    Thanks for the confirmation.

    New tires are installed, the 990 just likes to eat them. If needed I will just buy them down there. Not planning on going into the Yucatan but time, conditions, weather will dictate the trip.

    Cheers, Chris
    Animo likes this.
  12. Animo

    Animo Been n00b awhile Supporter

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    Checking tire pressure every other fill up is a good idea for wear. I doubt you’ll need it, but if you do, you can find tires on https://www.mercadolibre.com.mx/

    Shipping time is usually 5 days. You can send them to a hotel one week away from the current location, as long as you reserve and notify them of a shipment.

    You can find tires in San Cristobal in Chiapas as well with Zaul at
    Moto Adventure Service
    +52 967 119 9209
    https://goo.gl/maps/uYtczjeztFERVBXEA
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  13. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

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    The tire market in Mexico is a lot better and prices are not astronomical like they used to be, but... Keep in mind that most dealerships don't see bikes like your 990 on a regular basis. Showing up at a smaller town bike shop and expecting them to have the tires you want in stock is not realistic (actually, it's not realistic in the US either). They will have to order them from the distributor (most likely in CDMX) and could take anywhere from a couple of days to a couple of weeks to get, depending on where the shop is, what you want, what's in stock at the distributor, when they ship, etc.. Sometimes it's faster to simply go to one of the bigger towns and get the tires there.

    Gustavo
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  14. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    I just brought down new Moto tires last week. Had to pay at the customs booth. Duty is 16% so in my case about $40. But the local Llantera mounted them for $15 the pair
  15. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    Heading down to Batopilas last Monday.
    upload_2021-10-1_14-35-52.png

    And the ride back up with Bisbonian up in front on his MG V85.

    upload_2021-10-1_14-36-41.png
    A quick trip.

    Now back to work on the November Meet-Up
    chilejack, OroDas, akaDigger and 7 others like this.
  16. patched

    patched Adventurer

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    I did Batopilas to Urique last March on a MG V85tt! I don't think I could have done it with a hack!
  17. Turkeycreek

    Turkeycreek Gringo Viejo

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    The road up and back was not bad. Sonora Hwy 20 and parts of Mex 16 were a lot of work. The Batopilas bridge was fun. It felt like less than about an inch of the raised pavement before the tires would drop off into the center
    Ohio_Danimal and pceire32 like this.
  18. McFoil

    McFoil Filthy Pig

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    I ship tires every year from the US to Vallarta, Jal for past 4 years using DHL. Never a problem.
    noshoes, pceire32 and shiryas like this.
  19. Sjoerd Bakker

    Sjoerd Bakker Long timer

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    Animo suggested

    “”Checking tire pressure every other fill up is a good idea for wear.””

    For experienced riders it should not need to be clarified what is meant by “ checking tire pressure “ , but for the newlings champing at the bit raring to venture out it won’t hurt repeating:

    If tire pressure is checked while at the gas pump the pressure reading will probably be inaccurate on the high side because the tire may still be warm -to -hot from the riding. Personally I have seen some motorcyclists who then felt they needed to drain off some air to restore their ideal gauge setting(!) Tire pressures should be read when still cold, not adjusted to the spec when warm . Leave it be during the day when tires and ambient air temperatures rise.

    Fumbling with tire gauges frequently is a good way to bleed off air . A too-soft tire will heat up quickly due to excessive flexing and it will eventually blow up at high speed or fail otherwise .


    Unless you are the type of person who raises and drops tire pressure and measures it for every change in dirt road surface , is it really that important to check the actual pressure so often ?

    If a tire gets a puncture it will quickly let you know it is too soft! A slow leak too will be evident soon enough if one learns to be sensitive to the feel of “ too soft” .

    If one only puts a tire gauge on the valve stem several times daily it is sure to drop the pressure , and you may think you have a leak .

    You might as well be at a tire pump every morning , cold , give it a shot and bleed to desired pressure . A lot of needless work in my lazy estimation .

    I work on the method of setting “ a” right cold pressure then ,for baseline reference, press the thumbs in the middle of the tread to feel how hard that is and see how much , if any , of bulge there is in the sidewalls from only the weight of the bike and if or how much it wiggles from wrenching the handlebars side to side violently at standstill.

    After that , at the start of a ride day I look if the tires are squatting more and if they thumb-feel softer than they should . I go weeks between putting a tire gauge on them, sometimes months, and don’t seem to have any problem with faster than usual wear . I do not ride trying to spin the rear wheel to throw dirt for show effect , and I go easy on the brakes.
  20. Animo

    Animo Been n00b awhile Supporter

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    Thank you for your infinite wisdom :rolleyes

    How difficult is it to add 5psi to the cold reading when you’re checking a hot tire?

    I’ve never owned a bike or car for that matter, which didn’t lose some air during the course of time.
    roadcapDen and pceire32 like this.