J&M Handlebar CB RADIO Mounting Option

Discussion in 'GS Boxers' started by onesaintsfan, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. onesaintsfan

    onesaintsfan BigJohnHart

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    Need pics of how you all mounted your J&M CB Radios on a GS. I have one pic just wondering what the other options are.

    Thanks in advance
    #1
  2. onesaintsfan

    onesaintsfan BigJohnHart

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    Can't remember whose bike this was that posted these but anyone else have pics of how you did yours? On my last GS( 04 1150 ) I made a base plate and put it on a ram arm. Worked good. But now with the different arrangement I don't have the room as before
    #2
  3. onesaintsfan

    onesaintsfan BigJohnHart

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    Rear view, looks like it only attaches at one point. Thanks guys
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  4. Dagny_Taggart

    Dagny_Taggart John Galt - 2020 Supporter

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    I asked sierra Motorcycle what it would cost to install a 2003 unit. They asked what bike and then said "We don't touch BMWs." I cocked my head to one side and asked "CAN-BUS?"

    No, noisy electrical system. I'm thinking BS and I keep going back to this unit. I'm going on a road trip in October with a Gold Wing and they have a CB and want "com" between the bikes.

    Please, post up after install and tell us what you think of the audio performance and the CB performance of the unit. Thanks n advance.
    #4
  5. rideLD

    rideLD The further the better!

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    Its true, the 1200GS has a very noisy electrical system. This has been verified by Autocom and Beahr. The problem is that huge alternator that gives us so much extra power to run all these gadgets, make the gadgets noisy. Also the spark plug coils are on the loud side and you get easily get spark ticking if you are not careful.

    As long as you are using a high quality, well shielded system with quality all isolated cords it is possible through lots of trial and error to end up with a very quiet system.

    I have done many autocomm installations but no J&M (who uses CB anymore?:D ). The easiest way to get a quiet autocomm installation is to mount it in a powered tank bag. This keeps all the cords away from the noisy electrical system. If you want to mount it on the bike the best way I have found is to not run the wires along the existing harness on the left side of the bike. (This will give you electrical noise every time.) Remove the tank and run the wires down the right side of the frame taking extra care to not get them too near the noisy ABS controller. Lots of people like to put their units in the tool tray. This works but you will have to be careful to route your wires around the battery. Its basically a situation where you go for a test ride, move the wires, go for another test ride and see if its any better.

    If you use in the ear, high fidelity ear plugs, you will be much more sensitive to electrical noise and the opposite is true if you use helmet speakers. It is possible to get that electrical noise free instillation on a R1200GS but its not as easy as it is on most bikes. :nod
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  6. Dagny_Taggart

    Dagny_Taggart John Galt - 2020 Supporter

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    Goldwingers and HD baggers:deal

    Great information... Maybe I'll just continue to use handsignals... I like peace and quiet on the road.

    Thanks for the reply rideLD:1drink
    #6
  7. onesaintsfan

    onesaintsfan BigJohnHart

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    Well, I use it but only because my main riding buddy has one and thats how we communicate while on the road. We have not stepped into the bluetooth era yet. Plus I have nice Arai helmet with 6-pin headset that I need to utilize. The Zumo plugs right in to this setup so I have the tunes while ridding.

    I had the CB2003 on my 04 GS and my buddy has one on his 05 GS. They work great with little noise.

    Looks like my best option right now will be on a ram arm. But I have a Mount from my old ST1300 that may can be modified

    When all this stuff comes it will take some trial and error I suppose:norton
    #7
  8. nickatnite

    nickatnite Poster Boy for Red Death

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    John...

    Ditch the CB and get a decent tank bag (Go ahead and get the TT one) and buy an Autocomm and put everything in the tank bag.

    I did and DO NOT regret it! I can run the Midland CB or GMRS 2 way radio with the PTT switch on the left handgrip.

    Read THIS THREAD


    Nick
    #8
  9. bongodave

    bongodave Fixing Stupid

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    Being a trucker, I find CBs useful, even in this day and age. Yeah, there's a lot of smack-talk, but when problems come up, they're good to have.

    One thing that helps is to run it straight to the battery (at least on a truck or car). That bypasses a lot of interference and gives it solid power for transmitting.

    I imagine that with a small antenna, you won't get a lot of range out of it, but hearing what the truckers have to say can help avoid tickets and road hazards. If I ever get a big road bike, I'd consider one.
    #9
  10. onesaintsfan

    onesaintsfan BigJohnHart

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    Yea But..................................I don't like tank bags much. Prefer a discret hardwire system for use with the ZUMO
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  11. OoPEZoO

    OoPEZoO Dirtball Extraordinaire

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    That is definitely the truth. I have an old Hondaline intercom/CB on my RT that I use on a daily basis. I commute 600 miles a week on a major highway and always leave it on channel 19 with the squelch turned up real high. This cuts out 95% of the crap, but still lets me hear whats going on 1/2 mile or so ahead/behind me. It has saved my ass more times than I can count. Truckers will always call out speed traps and random things like "there is a bumper laying in the south bound hammer lane at mile marker XX". When traveling with my buddies that use radar detectors, I almost always know about the speed traps before they get a warning. I also use it on a pretty regular basis when traffic gets backed up so I can find out if it is an accident or just some morning rush hour asshat screwing up the flow. As soon as I hear accident, I'm off the highway and onto the back roads. I've found it so usefull when traveling on the bike that I have seriously considered adding a CB to my car as well.
    #11
  12. _Harry_

    _Harry_ Redneck Emeritus Supporter

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    Ground loop isolators are cheap and easy to find at Radio Shack or your favorite local e-shop. Just sayin...
    #12