James Bay and Northern Quebec

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Bueller, Jul 18, 2004.

  1. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    This is going to be a long story, and I promise there will be lots of pix-but not yet. I have to tell the story chronologically or I get all discombobulated :D so if you don't want to or don't know how to read all of the text you can just skip it all and look at the pretty pictures farther down in the post. You know, the same way you read BMWON or Playboy :lol3

    However, for those of you who can actually read and really want the story, here goes:

    My tale began last summer. I replaced my '00 RT with a '04 GS. My girlfriend already had a '01 F650 GS and had considered stepping up to a 1150R. But we want to see Alaska before too long and it was decided that we should both have GS's in anticipation of that trip.

    So I purchased the GS and started equipping it the way I saw fit, and all was well. As I started doing some research about Alaska I figured out the road and travel conditions could get kind of tough sometimes. Wouldn't it be better to be experienced at that kind of travel before comitting to a 10,000 + mile trip? I certainly thought so, and I started looking for a couple of trips I could take that would be closer to home yet still present me with some of the challenges I might find on a motorcycle in Alaska. Dirt, mud, gravel, cool temperatures, and rain would all be expected up there, so I wanted to experience riding the GS in those environments but without such a huge commitment the first time.

    Last fall my girlfriend Candi and I went to MRN's "Unrally" in Eureka Springs Arkansas. While we were there we ran into our old friend John Harvey (Ontario GS). He didn't own a GS at the time and had ridden his RT to the unrally. Since he knew that I had gone from an RT to the GS he had several questions for me. As we were talking about everything I think I told him about my plans for Alaska but I was looking for some stuff closer to home to go see first. I can't remember if he suggested the James Bay area to me, or if I had already learned about it and mentioned it to him, but the seed was planted.

    Some time later (it was still winter) John emailed me to tell me he had purchased a new GS. At this point we really started working on the plans to meet and ride to James Bay. Actually John and his wife Heather started working on the plans while I just freeloaded :D I figured it would be like any long distance trip I've done. I had already proven I could do 1100 miles two up in less than a day, and I knew what tools and equipment to carry. I had already taught my girlfriend the art of packing lightly and tightly (leave the fucking hair dryer at home, there's no fucking place to plug it in anyway!) on previous trips, and she & I had already been successful at motorcycle camping on the RT. So as far as I was concerned all we really needed to do was agree on a date and show up at John's house ready to go.

    We agreed on July 10th - July 18th as the week we would make the trip. As the winter turned to spring John and I would shoot an occasional email back & forth about it all, probably more to keep it in the forefront of our collective consciousness and fight off the winter blues than for any other real purpose. As the weather warmed up outside John started getting serious. I started getting questioned about accomodations (hotel, camping, or a mix), food preferences, etc. This guy was really organized! He had already received his James Bay info packet from the Gov't before I'd even gotten around to requesting one. He was working on an itinerary for the entire trip before I'd even figured out how I was going to get to his house! So I'm a little bit of a slacker when it comes to this stuff, but I've managed to get through life so far, right?

    Finally we wrapped up enough of the details to call it a plan. Candi and I would depart Saturday morning July 10th for Peterborough, Ontario. We would cover the 560 miles hopefully by dinner time, meet John and Heather for dinner if we were early enough, stay with them overnight, and then we would all leave for James Bay the next day. We would do a combination of hotels and camping, and each of us would carry our own tent, sleeping bags, therm-a-rest, etc. John and Heather would carry the camping stove and food for all of us, and I would carry the extra gas for all of us. John and Heather would ride two-up on his GS while Candi and I each rode our own bikes.

    About 3 weeks before our departure date I started getting the bikes in order. Candi's bike ate a decent amount of parts. I replaced the chain, sprockets, rear tire & tube, rear wheel bearings, and performed the 18,000 mile service. I did the 12,000 mile service on my GS and replaced the tires. During the last week I spent so much time working and prepping things I really didn't get much sleep for several nights in a row (this would come back to haunt me later on in the trip, but I'll get into that later). Finally the weekend of July 10th arrived. We loaded up the bikes and got everything ready. It was then that I figured out Candi had lost her Throttle Rocker. Being the nice guy that I am I gave her mine and decided I would suffer without it. Usually she complains about wrist pain more than me if she doesn't have one, so it was a good trade. I would endure a sore wrist but I wouldn't have to listen to her bitch :wink:

    We headed out Saturday morning July 10th as planned under cool temps and rainy skies. No trip would be complete without a departure in the rain, and good ol' Ohio didn't let us down. We got about 45 minutes away from home and the skies opened up on us. We spent most of the next hour in the rain, then things dried up and got sunny. We had a pretty uneventful trip all the way to Peterborough. Even the Border crossing into Canada was quick and easy. I don't think the Canadians are nearly as concerned about security as the U.S. is. Everyone knows the terrorists want to blow us up, not Canada.

    We arrived in Peterborough shortly after dinner time. John and Heather have a nice house in a quiet neighborhood, and they were excellent hosts. We talked for quite a while, then they got us dinner from a local restaurant that makes some fantastic Italian food. We probably stayed up too late (adding to my growing sleep deficit), took showers so we wouldn't have to in the morning, then went to bed. The day's mileage was 581.

    We got up the next morning around 6:00 if I remember correctly. I didn't sleep very well, but that was no fault of John & Heather's. I think I was just starting to reach that point where I had been sleep-deprived long enough that I was almost too tired to sleep. I'm sure you've been there before at some point in the past. It's never a good feeling. However, once I was up and moving the excitement took over, and I was ready to go. John & Heather made us a nice breakfast we were ready.

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    To be continued...
    #1
  2. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    We left Peterborough under sunny skies and cool temperatures. John was leading because Candi and I had no clue where we were going. Once we were out of town a little bit I started taking some pictures. I haven't quite mastered the art of controlling the bike with one hand and taking pix with the other, but I did the best I could.

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    The terrain in Ontario surprised me. I expected it to be quite flat and boring, but the farther north and east we went the more hilly it got. The weather and scenery were better than I expected and I settled into a comfortable groove, just cruising along and taking in the sights. Somewhere along the way toward Quebec I actually captured visual proof that a Harley rider will wave to BMW riders:

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    I continued playing with the camera, partly for practice taking pix while riding, partly because there was nothing better to do. We were just covering miles, trying to get to the good stuff.

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    Shortly before we crossed into Quebec we stopped at a gas station. While getting gas I heard a motorcycle approaching, but it wasn't a typical modern bike. I hadn't heard the sound in many years, but once I saw him pull in I immediately remembered.

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    A blast from the past. A two stroke Kawasaki Triple. This particular model was the 500 cc version. I would still love to find a 750 cc version in good condition. Unfortunately it's not on the short list.

    Some time shortly before lunch we crossed into Quebec

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    Basically this meant that for the next several days we would mostly be communicating with the locals through Heather because she spoke significantly more French than all of the rest of us combined.

    We stopped for lunch a while later, then continued to the north for most of the rest of the day. We stopped for the night in a town called "Lebel Sur Quevillon", and stayed at the Motel Du Lac. Candi saw a Bear Cub off the side of the road on the way to Lebel Sur Quevillon, but it was gone back into the woods before I caught up to it.

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    Appropriately named I guess, since it really was on a lake.

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    Yep, Lebel Sur Quevillon was a happening place. The local disco was conveniently located right across the street.

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    We never even bothered to go into the town itself, but here is a pic of it.

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    John and I picked up some beer and then parked the bikes for the day.

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    Then we sat around for a while having a drink and a snack while getting assaulted with black flies. John and Heather had warned us to bring bug jackets and repellent, and we did as they said. But some of those little bastards still managed to take a few chunks out of me. Candi faired significantly worse. Apparently black flies are discriminatory and prefer blondes.

    Later we walked into town and got a pizza for dinner. Despite our best efforts Heather had to order our pizza for us. They still screwed it up but it was a good pizza anyway. After dinner we turned in for the night. The motel room was so hot I couldn't sleep (that's night number 6 of little to no sleep), and there was no air conditioner. Still when I awoke the next day I was excited. Day #3 would bring us into the wilderness and prove to be a really challenging day.

    To be continued...
    #2
  3. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    Ok, you got me on a technicality. I should have said we walked to the edge of town where there was a pizza joint, but we never went up the hill into the area you see in the picture. Geez! Cut a guy a break!
    #3
  4. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    We got up early again, as we did every morning of the trip. I think this was the morning we got up really early, but I can't quite remember. The lack of sleep was really starting to cook me at this point, and some of the details have been lost. But I think we got started around 5:30. We went across the street to the disco/restaurant and had a surprisingly good breakfast. As an added bonus it was cheap, too! I came to appreciate this later on because I found the farther north you go, the farther south your wallet goes!

    After breakfast we got on the road. This turned out to be a long day. We had to cover approximately 2 hours of travel between Lebel Sur Quevillon and Chibougamau, then eat lunch, and finally get stocked up and ready for the gravel road that led to the north.

    Once we were in Chibougamau we found the only logical choice for lunch.

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    PFK actually stands for "Poulet Frit Kentucky", which is of course the backward-assed way Quebecois refers to Kentucky Fried Chicken. It was almost the same, but not quite. Their cole slaw wasn't nearly as good, and instead of hot macaroni & cheese they had some kind of cold macaroni with a funky cheese sauce that had peppers mixed in. Downright nasty if you ask me, but of course we didn't know that until after we had purchased it. After lunch we purchased some chicken sandwiches, anticipating the fact that there would be nowhere to eat when we camped that evening.

    After handling the food issues we loaded everything up and headed out to get gas.

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    I love the Esso stations. It's a throwback to when I was a kid. I'm sure many of you remember that Esso was the original name for Exxon in this country. The Esso gas signs bring back a lot of memories, even back into the 60's when dad would throw the family into the '66 ford wagon he owned and drive all night from our house in Memphis, Tn. to Columbus, Ohio to see the family. I remember more than a couple trips like this when I would wake up in the middle of the night because I realized the car wasn't moving anymore, and that Esso sign would just be glaring at me. The good ol' days, when gas smelled good and 102 octane was readily available at the local pump. And it had lead, goddamnit, real honest to god tetra-ethyl lead. Not the sissy 87 octane diet gas we get force-fed today. It was the good stuff, and it killed brain cells and caused birth defects. Nothing less would have been acceptable in those days. Almost everything with 4 wheels had a V-8, and nothing smelled as good as the mixture of burnt high octane fuel mixed with tire smoke from a roasted set of Firestone Wide Ovals. If your car got more than 8 miles to the gallon it was simply un-American. Even as a child every time I heard a big-block lump of American V-8 pass the 6000 RPM mark I got a woody. Ah, but now I'm rambling...back to the trip.

    About 20 Km's north of Chiboougamau we came to Route Du Nord. This is a 400 + Km long gravel road that goes north and turns west toward the paved road to James Bay, and intersects it at Km 271.

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    This sign gave us a good idea of just how far we would be travelling before we saw any real civilization again.

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    Poste Nemiscau is the only gas stop on the road, and believe me there is nothing but nature for the 288 Km's it takes to get there.

    Before we started down the road we had to stop and take a few pics.

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    More to come...
    #4
  5. Fang

    Fang Adventurer

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    #5
  6. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    I don't think the front fender or tire wear on the CLC would be your issue. I think simply keeping the bike upright would have been the problem. I'll be posting that part of the story today or tonight, and hopefully I can finish the damn thing. But it takes time sorting through all of the pictures & stuff.

    The CLC is a heavy bike that will not fair well on a soft, soupy road. When it goes over there is a significant risk of costly damage. Not worth the risk IMO, although the wilderness we saw on that road was pretty incredible. You can get to Radisson without taking any gravel roads, and getting to James Bay only requires 12Km of gravel that was much better packed than Route Du Nord. I'd recommend you look into the "safe" route with a CLC.
    #6
  7. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    Here is a map of the area we traversed:

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    The Magenta colored line just north of Chibougamau is Route Du Nord.

    We started up Route Du Nord without much incident, except for my stomach, which was churning pretty badly. I popped an immodium and off we went. The weather was alternating between rain and sun and the road was mostly packed gavel and/or packed sand, as I had seen described on the internet. The scenery was worth the trip. Again, I was surprised at the amount of hills in the area.

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    As we progressed the road got a little softer off to the sides.

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    There were no houses or any other markings of civilization of any kind, except for the road we were on. Occasionally a small, short road would offshoot from Route Du Nord, but it was probably just an access road to a logging area.

    Our travel speed was relatively slow. I'm not the world's best in dirt & gravel, and Candi has minimal experience. Before this trip we rode some fire trails in Virginia back in May, and I rode behind her and attempted to coach her via FRS radios. Apparently there were two concepts that stuck with her:

    1) On gravel, faster is better than slow.

    2) Standing on the pegs will usually make it easier to control the bike.

    She took these two concepts to heart, and our speed varied between about 35 - 60 mph. Usually we were averaging 40-45 mph. For a while the road wasn't bad. Once in a while we'd get passed by a large semi, and I suppose those trucks help keep the road packed. But as we progressed further and further into the wilderness the road seemed to get less packed.

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    By this point we weren't seeing any more logging trucks, and although the scenery was still awesome the road was really starting to kick my ass. The lack of sleep for the last several days had caught up with me, and the road was getting very loose. I was sliding all over the place with the front end plowing through an average of 3-4 inches of sand most of the time. Every time I tried to go fast enough to get on top of the sand instead of sinking down into it inevitably I would find an unmarked soft spot several inches deep or more. On one such occasion I went into a series of tank slappers at about 45 mph and counted 8 of them before I got the bike under control. I had several other tank slapper experiences, but that was the worst one. I'm sure the 40 extra pounds of sloshing gasoline I was carrying upright on top of the toolkit wasn't helping. I was getting really worried about Candi's ability to handle the conditions. Also, reality was setting in. If I crashed we risked losing our spare gas. Worse yet, if any of us crashed and broke a bone there was clearly no help around for many miles. The only solution to a broken arm would be duct tape and a painful ride out of the wilderness. My stomach had been upset and rumbling since we left Chibougamau, and even though I knew I was having intestinal difficulties I was so clinched I couldn't have passed a pebble.

    We continued on until late in the afternoon, when we came to a camping area (complete with porta-johns) and an incredible river.

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    I believe this was the Rupert River. The rapids were pretty incredible.

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    I finally got some relief thanks to the available facilities, and we continued on in an attempt to make the camping area John had selected when we were planning the trip. Along the way we passed mile after mile of burned up trees. Apparently there was a huge forest fire sometime within the last few years. Finally we made Camp Nemiscau in a moderate rain shower. We had just barely made it in time to get gas, and although it was close to 5 bucks a gallon I wasn't complaining. While we were stopped here we met up with Paul from Halifax, NS. Better known as "Tree", he & John had chatted via email before we left on the trip and made arrangements to meet up with each other at some point. Tree was riding a '94 R1100RS with street tires. After experiencing so much difficulty on a GS with fresh tourances tree definitely has my respect for riding his R1100 though all of that stuff and keeping it upright.

    We debated our next move. It was still raining. If we continued on to the designated camping area we would get there in the dark. We were all pretty wiped out. We decided to go a few Km's up the road to the Cree village of Nemasca and see if we could find a place to camp. We turned onto the road to Nemasca and found a great area right next to a lake. A local came driving by and we asked permission to set up camp. The people of this village were very nice. They didn't seem to have a problem with us staying there. In fact I think it was quite the opposite. I think they were glad we stayed there. My guess is that not much ever changes in those parts, and 5 people pulling up on 4 BMW motorcycles isn't a daily occurrence, particularly when one of the riders pulls off the helmet and long blonde hair comes out. Both of the village police came by, as well as most of the village. Some of them stopped and talked to us, others just drove by repeatedly, looking at us and our gear.

    They had built a couple of little shelters along this lake, and we set up camp inside of them.

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    It was a fantastic place to camp.

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    As we went to unload our gear I found that our packed food from PFK had exploded all over my topcase and it's contents. There was cole slaw and that god-awful macaroni stuff all over the place. We salvaged the chicken patties and I washed everything else out in the lake. Tree went down the road to the village to see if there was any food he could buy. He came back with some cans of pop and 3 candy bars. I was greatful as it was better than our alternative, which was NOTHING!

    By this point I was really starting to feel physically terrible. I ate the chicken patty and the candi bar. We sat around the fire for a while being entertained by John and Tree. John is a really funny dude to hang out with, and Tree has been all over the place and has some great stories to tell. But I was feeling worse & worse. The lack of a good dinner with the addition of a candy bar sent my blood sugar reeling. Combined with a high level of stress for the day and the fatigue I had been experiencing for several days I started getting pretty anxious. I used to have this issue years ago and I always carry some medication when I travel just in case, but I was surprised I was feeling this way because it had been so long since I'd had any issues. Knowing that physically speaking things weren't going to get any better that night I told everyone I was tired and needed to get some sleep.

    Candi and I retired to our tent, and I attempted to get some sleep. The anxiousness continued to climb to a more intense level. Finally I couldn't stand it anymore. My mind was racing, and I was going to be up all night at this rate. I took some Zanax and waited for it to take effect. Over an hour later I finally fell into a fitful sleep for a couple of hours. I alternated between cat naps and consciousness for the rest of the night, wondering how in the hell I was going to complete this trip without collapsing from exhaustion.

    Day 4 coming up...
    #7
  8. Colt03

    Colt03 Been here awhile

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    Bueller, Great posts keep sending them. My Neighbor did the James Bay trip two years ago on a Honda Nighthawk !

    I would like to do it in the next year or so.
    #8
  9. lockcrash

    lockcrash Celtic Tiger

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    Keep it comin' Bueller, I want to see pics of James Bay. I was planning a similar trip this summer myself before I realised I'd have visa hassle
    #9
  10. davidmc

    davidmc Been here awhile

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    Great pixs & report, looking forward to more!
    #10
  11. Buelr_Grl

    Buelr_Grl n00b

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    OK, why all the hub-bub about a blonde on a motorcyle? Brunettes on Buells are great too!!

    Attached Files:

    #11
  12. Linzi

    Linzi Crazy Plott Lady

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    Brunettes are way better than blondes! :D

    Buells, though...uh, not so good. :rofl
    #12
  13. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

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    Morning comes early at this time of the year in these parts, and the day lasts a long time. Typically the birds were singing at 4 A.M., and we could still see sunlight at 11 P.M. It sounds neat, but the fact is it really screwed up my perception of time. I suspect this also had something to do with my repeated inability to sleep very much. It just made me feel "wired" all of the time.

    Day #4 (Tuesday) started with the little bastards chirping right on cue at about 4 A.M. I was so tired I attempted to sleep until about 5:30, and I might have gotten 20-30 minutes in there. But finally I just had to quit fighting it and get up. It was a little chilly out-not really terribly cold, but just enough to make me shiver a little. Perhaps in the mid-40's and partly cloudy. It was looking like we were going to have a good day in terms of weather, but around here you never really know what mother nature is going to serve up just around the corner.

    John is a morning person. He got up and started building a fire. He was all upbeat and talkative. It's hard for people like me who wake up slow and grumpy to digest a happy person in the morning, but I was determined not to ruin anyone else's vacation simply because I couldn't sleep and was a ball of panic and nerves at this point. So I hung out with John while he worked the fire and fired up the portable stove to make coffee and hot chocolate. He & Heather put on quite the show. They had cheese, apples, and melba toast to share with us. In light of last night's lack of food this was a welcome surprise. It was especially nice because I knew we would not get to a food place for several more hours.

    Tree got up last and joined us for breakfast. We talked more about the conditions we had encountered the day before. Tree had also experienced a good tank slapper, perhaps even worse than mine. We compared notes to see if they both happened at the same place, but I couldn't quite remember.

    After breakfast we packed up camp and headed out for more sand/gravel riding. I was still feeling quite anxious so I took some zanax before we left. It's quite a balancing act. Zanax will relieve anxiety, but it can also impair one's ability to control a motor vehicle. Furthermore since it is a benzodiazepene class drug (like Valium) it can cause depression. The trick was to take just enough to make me feel better without incurring the other unwanted effects. There was only one way to find the right amount, so I made my best guess and took a pill.

    We got back onto Route Du Nord and headed towards the James Bay road. There was some confusion about the amount of dirt we had to cover before we reached pavement again, but it was right around 125 Km. This turned out to be the worst stretch of the road. It was LOOSE! Often our speeds were down to around 25-30 mph, but Candi and I had discussed it before we left and decided that we didn't care if it took us all day to get off of that road, we were going to do it safely and slowly. I didn't need any more tank slappers or other adrenaline-inducing issues at this point, and Candi really didn't want to crash her bike for the 3rd time this year. So slow was the order of the day.

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    The partly cloudy weather I had woken up to was already turning to partly rainy. We went in & out of some rain showers. When riding in the rain it was cold enough to use a liner under the Darien Jacket I was wearing. When the sun came out it was too damn hot for the liner. We dealt with the yo-yo weather as best we could and continued on. My GS was pinging like mad on the shitty 87 octane fuel we had purchased at Nemiscau. Finally after approximately 3 hours we reached pavement. This is the intersection of Route Du Nord and the James Bay road, where they have a nice pull off complete with porta-johns:

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    I think we were all glad to be here, and I was particularly relieved that we arrived here without a single crash, though we had come so close so many times.

    I decided it would be best to get what was left of the shitty gas out of my bike, then refill it with the contents of the gas can. I had filled the gas can with Esso 91 octane at Chibougamau, and in light of the way the GS was pinging on the 87 garbage I figured it would be better to be safe rather than sorry. The nearest BMW dealer was almost a thousand miles away at this point. A burned valve or melted piston-while expensive to fix-would still have come in cheaper than the ridiculous tow bill I would have to pay if I melted the engine this far north. Combining the two bills would have run me into bankruptcy!

    Tree and John had both brought siphon hoses with them. We siphoned the gas into Tree's gas can and a Mellow Yellow bottle that Tree dug out during a dumpster dive at the local dumpster. We put the gas in John's GS, which didn't seem to be suffering any ill effects from it at all. Perhaps the difference is that mine is spec'd for the U.S. and his is Canadian. There must be some difference.

    It was getting kind of warm out, and while we were messing with the bikes Candi took off her riding gear. It was immediately obvious that black flies really do prefer blondes.

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    She was eaten up, despite the fact that she was using deet and a bug jacket. Such is life in the north, eh?

    Once I was done refilling my gas tank we headed north on the James Bay Road. We had to cover a little over 100 Km's to get to Km 381, the only stop on the James Bay Road. They had gas, food, and showers there. Now 100 Km's doesn't sound like much most of the time. After all, it was not quite an hour's travel to get there. But with the way I was feeling at this point 10 Km was too much! I really had to force myself to get on the bike and get going.

    We arrived with the sun still shining and went inside in anticipation of a good meal. It was just a cafeteria that served some sandwiches, burgers, and desserts, all at ridiculous prices. But we didn't care. It was FOOD!

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    I was so hungry I could have eaten one of everything on the menu, or so I thought. I got a burger, fries, and a drink to start. As it turned out I was feeling so sick I couldn't even finish the couple of items I had purchased. I did my best to try and hide how badly I was feeling from everyone else, but I don't think they were fooled for a minute. I hope they weren't too worried about it, and I didn't really explain to everyone why I was feeling so bad. I really didn't want to talk about it. But Candi knew what was going on. She did her best to help out.

    After lunch everyone decided they wanted to take showers.

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    After all it had been 2 days since the last one. As a result I found that Aerostich gear does a great job of holding in B.O. in addition to it's weather and crash protection! As for me, I was so tired I decided to skip the shower in exchange for sleep. I went outside, put on the helmet so the bugs wouldn't eat me, and laid down on a picnic table in classic Iron-Butt motel style. I probably slept about 1/2 hour, but at this point every little bit would help. I woke up in a complete daze. Everyone was repacking their gear after their showers so I got up and started walking around to try to shake the cobwebs out of my head.

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    I was still a bundle of nerves so I took another zanax. The pills weren't working very well but at least they were working somewhat.

    At this point mentally I was at a cross-road. The voice in my head was telling me to abandon this trip in favor of civilization and sleep. To hell with James Bay, I didn't need to see it that badly. I could head south and make Matagami in 3 hours. There I could get a nice hotel room. But I'm a pretty stubborn dude. I wasn't going to travel all this way only to turn around less than 300 miles from my ultimate destination. Still I just didn't think I could get back on the bike and continue north. I looked around at my surroundings and contemplated getting a room here for the night. I could stay and rest, then catch up with everyone else in Radisson tomorrow. But zanax-induced depression was starting to set in. I just couldn't stomach the idea of staying at this camp for the night. Feeling like I was quickly running out of choices I did the only thing I could think of to do. It's the same thing I do whenever I'm finding a task extremely difficult to complete. I broke it down into little pieces. "Ok, I'm going to get on the bike and click it into gear. Then I'm going to twist the throttle. I'll see what happens from there. If I make it 10 kilometers and have to pull over and try to sleep, so be it. I'll set up camp and let the others go on. If I make it farther, that's a bonus".

    I talked myself all the way up to our destination in Radisson, almost 250 Km away. I don't really know how I did it, I just did it. But once we got there I was spent. So was our gas. I listened to the fuel pump gurgle for the last 5 Kilometers, wondering at what point I was going to have to push. Surprisingly it made it, even though I had ridden with the fuel light on for over 40 miles.

    We gassed up and checked in with the local campgrounds. We got our spot and set up camp. It was a nice clean area.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    As you can see we had to get the bug protection gear out in force.

    I went to the campground facilities and took a nice long shower while Candi set up our tent. The shower was somewhat warm and felt great! It temporarily revived me somewhat. At least enough for me to accompany everyone into town and get some dinner. We had a nice meal at "Mike & Jo's" (one of 2 restaurants to choose from in Radisson) and were served by a hot looking young French-Canadian girl who also spoke some english with a very sexy accent.

    After dinner we went back to camp. I took another Zanax in the hopes that it would help me get a good night's sleep and went to bed. It was late (close to 11:00, I think), but I could still see the sun. I thought to myself "at some point the madness has to end". Then I fell promptly asleep, for the first time in many days.

    Stay tuned...
    #13
  14. Bueller

    Bueller Cashin? Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2003
    Oddometer:
    18,430
    Location:
    Hide Away Hills, Ohio
    BTW folks, I know this chick. She's a hottie and she's got a wicked forked tongue. Let the cat fight begin! Linzi drew first blood...
    #14
  15. bpeterson

    bpeterson no other way to say it

    Joined:
    May 25, 2003
    Oddometer:
    1,098
    Location:
    NJ
    dude, you better friggin finish this story quick, before I buy your bike and make you ride to James Bay all over again! :D

    good stuff man, keep in comin'
    #15
  16. VistaCruiser

    VistaCruiser Adventurer

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2003
    Oddometer:
    25
    Location:
    Between Casar and Polkville
    Great stuff Bueller, I've always wondered what that trip would be like. Your pics tell it all. :thumb
    #16
  17. Buelr_Grl

    Buelr_Grl n00b

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2
    Buells aren't so good, huh?!!?!?! If you can beat me, you can eat me...
    #17
  18. Linzi

    Linzi Crazy Plott Lady

    Joined:
    May 18, 2003
    Oddometer:
    15,471
    Location:
    Norris, TN
    This is a good ride report, so if we're going to continue, I'd rather not hijack the thread. :): You can meet me in JM, as I started a new thread with all relevant info, thus far.

    Linzi and Buelr_Grl's Buell Discussion...
    #18
  19. RumRunner

    RumRunner Sit there, turn that

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2001
    Oddometer:
    6,323
    Location:
    Great White North

    Start your own thread for your shit, this one is about a ride into the bush.

    DW
    #19
  20. RumRunner

    RumRunner Sit there, turn that

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2001
    Oddometer:
    6,323
    Location:
    Great White North
    Looks like our mind waves were in sync, faster than we can type
    :D :thumb :nod

    DW
    #20