Kawasaki Versys-X 300

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by shyam334, Nov 8, 2016.

  1. Chucksklrst

    Chucksklrst Been here awhile

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    Anybody from the Denver area, would like to get together and compare notes and farkles on the X300. Just picked up a slightly used X300 that was bone stock.
    The_Precious_Juice likes this.
  2. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    Also make sure clutch is adjusted. If OP is new rider many neglect to adjust clutch properly which results in incomplete disengagement.
  3. Cole Trickle

    Cole Trickle n00b

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    Great price! Looks like we did about the same after taxes.

    I'd be happy to meet somewhere; hope to hear from you!
  4. rjmorel

    rjmorel Dual Sporticus

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    I don't have this particular bike, but I down shift to neutral while rolling to a stop if I can. Once stopped and it's not in neutral or first, your choice, rev motor a little and slightly let clutch in and out to get tranny to turn the gears inside so they can line up and find neutral while rocking it back and forth helps also. I think your bike is quite normal, some bikes have buttery smooth trannies like my Honda NC700x and others are just harder to find neutral at a stop like my RX3, rj
  5. Bullwinkle

    Bullwinkle Enthusiastic curmudgeon Supporter

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    Hey Victay...

    Don't get too worried about downshifting, it's a skill that improves with applied experience. First off, as a general rule, you shouldn't downshift all the way to 1st when moving. 2nd gear is the lowest gear you should ever down-select when moving, unless you are planning on slowing to the point where you need to crawl instead of stopping. The very short gearing of the Versys makes Ist only necessary when moving from a dead stop (and even then, 2nd can be used with minimal problems... but not always possible with the *KPNF function). Select 1st only after you have come to a complete stop, and that makes one less gearshift you need to accomplish when downshifting from any speed. With practice, you can be applying both brakes, disengage the clutch, downshift and blip the throttle to match revs before re-engaging the clutch... all in one quick, seamless operation.

    If you find yourself unable to get all your downshifts in when stopping, and need to downshift a number of times when stopped, rocking the bike slightly as others have suggested can help. Alternately, you may be able to engage the clutch slightly (not enough to actually start movement) between shifts to "bump" the cogs in the tranny and make finding the next gear easier. A full break-in of the bike may reduce the tranny "stickiness".

    There's a long standing debate whether it's better on the components to downshift and use engine braking to assist the brakes, or just to pull in the clutch and apply brakes, and have the appropriate gear selected when ready to continue moving. The theory is it's easier and cheaper to replace brake pads than clutch/tranny components. Regardless, one should endeavour to master both skills to the point where either method becomes second nature. Then you have the choice to do either, depending on circumstances.

    JP :beer
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  6. victay

    victay Enthusiastic Noob

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    Thanks Bullwinkle. Your advice is much appreciated.

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
  7. Steve0369

    Steve0369 Adventurer

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    Why can't you shift into 1st while moving? The gearbox has a slipper clutch so what am I missing?
    bombdefuzer likes this.
  8. victay

    victay Enthusiastic Noob

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    I'm too slow at changing down when coming to a stop. So I land up only having changed down to say 2nd or 3rd when I actually come to a stand still. Not always just sometimes. Its seems to be a new motorcycle/new rider issue. Bike is still breaking in and so am I :)
  9. Steve0369

    Steve0369 Adventurer

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    Hi Victay,
    The question was aimed at Bullwinkle. I was only trying to understand if there is a technical reason you should not change to first prior to stopping. As the gearbox is fixed gear with a slipper clutch I think you can change it while moving without causing any mechanical problems but I was wondering if I am missing something.
  10. Bullwinkle

    Bullwinkle Enthusiastic curmudgeon Supporter

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    Hi Steve,
    I didn't mean to imply that you CAN'T shift to 1st, but I certainly question the benefit if you're coming to a stop. The amount of engine braking attainable in 1st still doesn't come close to the power and controlability of the brakes at such low speeds (remember, kinetic energy is proportional to the square of the speed). It may also increase the stress on the clutch and other drivetrain components, even with a slipper clutch.

    Think of your gears as "ramps". When driving (as opposed to slowing), 1st is the least steep of the ramps, and 6th would be the steepest ramp. When slowing, the ramp (i.e. the hypoteneuse of a right triangle) is turned 90 degrees, such that 1st is now the steepest ramp. This means that for a small wheel movement, the effect on the drivetrain results in many more revolutions (i.e. the stress is magnified) . This is also why it is recommended to bumpstart older bikes (who does that anymore?) in 2nd, 3rd or higher gear.

    Another more obscure reason is that older automotive transmissions rarely had a synchromesh 1st gear, making it even more difficult to get a smooth shift into first when moving. This shouldn't be as much of an issue with motorcycle constant-mesh tranmissions, but old, ingrained habits often persist. :lol3

    Indeed, modern componentry and slipper clutches may make the matter inconsequential, but as with ABS and similar technology, the desired outcome is not to depend on them.

    JP
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  11. Moat

    Moat Been here awhile

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    Rotational speed differences between the transmission input shaft's 1st gear and it's corresponding output (counter)shaft-driven partner can be rather high as the bike is still rolling along - down-shifting to 1st gear (or any lower gear, really) too soon whilst decelerating can produce a pretty violent "thwack" into gear due to those speed disparities, possibly damaging the gear's engagement dogs.

    Definitely do as Cyclopathic mentioned, and make sure your clutch cable is adjusted properly - i.e.; without too much slack/free-play in the lever. Excessive free-play can certainly make it difficult/impossible to row through the gears at a stop! (Or even shifting, in general)

    Bob
  12. Steve0369

    Steve0369 Adventurer

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    Thanks Bullwinkle. A great explanation.
  13. inroads

    inroads Go West old man

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    BTW... Kawasaki's no fault neutral finder works beautifully stopped and in 1st.
    bombdefuzer likes this.
  14. Deadlyapollo

    Deadlyapollo Been here awhile

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    Didn't even know it had one haha
  15. Bullwinkle

    Bullwinkle Enthusiastic curmudgeon Supporter

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    A minor quibble to be sure, but I'm ambivalent about it. I can agree it works fine as a convenience and potential safety aid (possibly more so for less experienced riders), but it makes it virtually impossible to shift into 2nd or any other gear except 1st for various reasons (i.e. selecting 2nd from a stop, bump starting, maintenance, etc.).

    That I haven't had any need to use either function, for a long while now, is what makes it a minor quibble... :lol3

    JP
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  16. The_Precious_Juice

    The_Precious_Juice The Virginian

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    Bad news

    Word is getting out that the X 300 is a great MC. That will make the price go up on the show room floor.

    http://www.motorcycle.com/mobos/best-lightweight-entry-level-motorcycle-of-2017.html

    Honorable Mention: Kawasaki Versys-X 300
    [​IMG]

    By John Burns
    When it comes to new motorcycles, what I see running around the streets of my hood more than any other are Kawasaki Ninja 300s, and why not? They’re great little do-everything motorcycles for around $5,000. With ADV being all the rage lately, you wouldn’t need to be a marketing rocket scientist to think about putting that smooth little banshee of a 296cc parallel-Twin into a package exactly like the new Versys-X 300, which is exactly what Kawasaki did.

    What they wound up with is a super-versatile system (get it?) that’s way lighter – 386 pounds, says Kawasaki, with 4.5 gallons of gas – than the typical ADV, which goes a long way toward making 35 horsepower or so feel like enough. Though you will need to adjust to spending most of your time aboard the X with the tachometer needle pegged up toward the upper end of its sweep, a thing the little Twin seems perfectly happy to do. A slip/assist clutch with the lightest lever pull of all time, and a slick six-speed gearbox make it not much of a chore. Longer intake funnels, longer exhaust headers, and a slight retuning of fuelling and ignition broaden the powerband a tad compared to the Ninja.

    Its displacement may be small, but the rest of the bike is big enough for real humans, with a good-sized fairing to get behind in an expansive cockpit. A 32.1-in. seat height gives tall people enough legroom, but also lets shorties reach the ground. Firmish suspension, with 5.1-/ 5.8-in wheel travel, and a 19-/17-in. wire-spoke wheel combo gives the small Versys the feel of a bike that could take you on some pretty big adventures. Or, just ride it around every day. For $5,399 ($5,699 with ABS), how can you go wrong? This one completes the circle, perfectly complementing Versyses 650 and 1000.
  17. Aleeoop70

    Aleeoop70 EX-MX Adv Tourist

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    Do you still have the stock seat?
  18. asaulo1

    asaulo1 Adventurer

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    Just installed my new Yoshimura R-77 on the versys 300 and I couldn't be happier. Been waiting for this slip on for a while now and when it popped up at Revzilla as being in stock, I jumped on it. Aside from the now throatier sound, it also weighs a lot less than the stock exhaust which is an added benefit. Overall, I think it's worth the price of admission. Here's a quick video of the sound as well as some pulls around the block.
    Kd70qc, k12rsrdr, rich9402 and 2 others like this.
  19. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    Have you had them on the scale, what is weight difference?
  20. adsinger

    adsinger Ride fast. Stop often.

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    My Akropovich is just under 6 pounds lighter. Supposedly up .5HP. I think it's quieter than the Yoshimura though it has a deeper sound than stock.