1. eNewsletter Sign Up

Kawasaki Versys-X 300

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by shyam334, Nov 8, 2016.

  1. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,791
    Location:
    Regina, SK, Canada
    Nope, no bias against aftermarket pipes. No issues with a pipe that has a different tone as long as it's not perceptibly louder both coming and going. Especially if it drops a useful amount of weight, and/or makes it easier to mount bags, and doesn't hurt performance or emissions.

    Big bias against pipes that are loud from the bystanders' perspective, whether aftermarket or stock.

    Just for clarification and no hard time assumed. :beer

    ...ken...
    michaelkozera likes this.
  2. rockt

    rockt Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,710
    Location:
    Canada

    Well, it sounded a bit biased, (... the only thing you could reasonably expect from just an exhaust change by itself was more noise.

    If that's all you're after and you don't mind spending money to make more noise and annoy non-bikers and some other bikers then go for it.), but, I hear you on the unnecessarily loud end of things. I've heard some aftermarket "mufflers", particularly on thumpers, that are ear-splitting. Not good.
  3. Rob.G

    Rob.G Mostly Harmless

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,858
    Location:
    Fulltiming in an RV! Currently Arizona
    I have nothing but good things to say about the Shinko 705 tires. I love those tires. I've run probably 6-8 sets of them over the years, on both my DR650 and V-Strom. I actually plan to get another set of them for my DR650 soon, since I have two wheelsets for it. I also foresee maybe a set on my Tiger 800XC at some point, although I'm putting Karoo 3's on it next.
    bombdefuzer likes this.
  4. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,434
    Location:
    calgary
    Exactly.

    After market pipes that are louder then stock are most certainly a down grade in my opnion.

    Pipes that are quieter, or at least similar in noise but less weight then stock is a huge plus.
    twaldron likes this.
  5. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,791
    Location:
    Regina, SK, Canada
    You aren't entirely wrong. When I look at the real reasons the majority of people are buying aftermarket pipes for the VX300 it appears the primary motivation is to change the sound. The other reasons are secondary at best. But that's not a bias against the aftermarket products. It's against the reasons people use them.

    For instance. just look at every single question and comment about this latest mod, including the primary focus of the video. They are about the sound.

    Also for instance, we have no idea what effect they have on performance or emissions because there is not yet any empirical data to inform us.

    And also for instance, if we've seen anyone whose primary motive was weight saving I don't recall such a post. I don't recall anyone posting the actual weight difference between their aftermarket exhaust/slip-on versus the stock bits they removed. Eg. they actually weighed things themselves and did not just take any advertised numbers at face value. Apologies if there were one or two that I've missed or forgotten.

    Yes, that could certainly be interpreted as bias against aftermarket pipes. But that was not my perspective. In truth it's a knock on riders who don't much care about what non-riders think. Maybe that's worse than a bias against aftermarket exhaust mods?? Don't know.

    I just know that I have no issues with companies trying to make a buck with loud aftermarket exhaust mods. I do have an issue with the fact there are enough customers for those products for them to be profitable for a whole bunch of companies.

    Just so. Thanks for understanding. That's all it's about for me. Unlike most riders here I've been faced directly with the consequences of rider actions that annoy the public. Noise is right at the top of the list, even higher than annoyance at riders who weave in and out of traffic with what appears to dangerously minimal clearance.

    I was a chief instructor of the provincial motorcycle safety training program for a number of years and a board member of the Safety Council during that time. In order to acquire many of the things necessary to the success of the program -- funding, facilities, cooperation from regulatory and licensing bodies, etc. -- I had to deal directly with lots of people who were not riders. Whenever they thought about motorcycles at all, the majority of them only had specific memories of the negative stuff that had caused them to take notice. While the majority of them were intelligent and tolerant enough to understand that didn't necessarily represent the majority of us, it constantly colored the conversation.

    I've had weeks of negotiations for something important set back after just one key person has been cut off by some knucklehead on an obnoxiously loud bike on the way to a meeting. "Please give me one good reason why I should be supportive of an activity that tolerates such ignorant @$#%^& riders!!!"

    Sorry for the dump. It was years ago but it still rankles every time I hear a loud bike.

    ...ken...
    bombdefuzer likes this.
  6. rockt

    rockt Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,710
    Location:
    Canada
    Sorry for the dump.

    No need to apologize Ken. As always, you're a valuable contributor here and you obviously think a great deal about your posts.

    I'm definitely in the camp of those not wanting to piss off people, especially non-motorcyclists, many of whom don't "get it" and are looking for any excuse to, at the very minimum, limit our freedom, (at worst, eliminate it).

    Back to the sound of a motorcycle, (not noise), some bikes just don't sound great and can use a little help. A 90 degree v-twin is a glorious sounding engine, but the stock Suzuki SV's and V-Stroms don't sing like they can. A well baffled aftermarket pipe can provide a beautiful deep soundtrack in that instance yet still not annoy people, (that's partly the rider's responsibility too - any bike, or car for that matter, stock or otherwise, is going to be annoying to others if the operator is revving the hell out of it in places they shouldn't). For me, sound is an important part of riding a motorcycle. I like to kind of play it like an instrument, if that makes sense to anyone other than me.

    I haven't ridden a VX3 yet, but I'm probably going to buy one in the near future. From the videos I've watched, it sounds pretty good, but I'd really like to hear firstshadow's bike from the rider's POV.
    7thson and twaldron like this.
  7. Rob.G

    Rob.G Mostly Harmless

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,858
    Location:
    Fulltiming in an RV! Currently Arizona
    The Shinko 705 is almost a do-everything tire. It's fantastic on the street, and excellent in rain. I'd say it sticks at least as well as the stock VX tires, possibly better. It's way better on dirt than it's appearance would suggest. Naturally, it will be weak if the dirt gets exceptionally loose or sandy, and it's not great in mud either, but I wouldn't expect it to be. But I think the wide lug spacing is what makes it so good overall.

    On my DR650 I was getting 6000 miles out of a rear tire; on my V-Strom, I would get 5000. I was going three rear tires per one front on the V-Strom. I did notice the rear would wear faster if I did a long trip with panniers full of gear. No real surprise there though.

    Frankly if they made sizes to fit my Sprint ST, I'd put them on it. Instead, I run Michelin Pilot Road 4's on it, which is IMO the best street tire money can buy (if you aren't a track day type of rider). :)
    11motos likes this.
  8. rideforzen

    rideforzen Long timer

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2016
    Oddometer:
    1,302
    Location:
    N.W. Oregon
    I will eventually put a aftermarket muffler on my VersysX. Just about every bike I've owned has got one. I don't like obnoxious loud, but I do like to hear my bike, even at speed. I know I annoy some with my truck, or Jeep, or dog or bike brand or just the way I look. I've learned to just laugh and live my own life knowing I'm not trying to bother anyone. I grew up around drag racing and motorcycles and love the different sounds engines put out. Hearing that deeper tone and having better flowing exhaust to go with larger jets and an air box mod, can bring some nice power gains also. I do like the price of jets vs a programmer, but the programmers are sure easier to change settings on. And with just a slip-on, the CPU should adjust fine.
  9. Rob.G

    Rob.G Mostly Harmless

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,858
    Location:
    Fulltiming in an RV! Currently Arizona
    Well, that's great. THANKS UPS. My Seat Concepts seat was finally delivered today.. despite being Out for Delivery both Friday and Saturday. I shipped my rear shock to Cogent today before work.
    Spud Rider likes this.
  10. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Oddometer:
    1,791
    Location:
    Regina, SK, Canada
    Ooops, screwed up. The Metzeler Tourances were the previous tires on the Beemer. The new ones this spring are Bridgestone Trail Wings, front and rear. Bullwinkle will likely correct me on that if he sees my first post before this one. We installed them at his place on both our GS's and he has a much better memory for such details.

    The Trail Wings also have a similar tread pattern to the Tourances and the Shinkos. They perform pretty much the same as the Tourances on the street and the bit of non-pavement riding I've done with the Beemer since putting them on. My only complaint about them is that they are a lot noisier than the Tourances on pavement. I likely wouldn't buy them again for that reason.

    ...ken...
  11. 11motos

    11motos Feral Rider

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2017
    Oddometer:
    1,859
    Location:
    On the Road
    My understanding is that in some places you need to have an approved spark arrestor if you intend to ride off road in forest areas.
  12. Gustavo

    Gustavo Motociclista Errante

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2004
    Oddometer:
    4,369
    Location:
    Sometimes in Hillsburrito
    There is a gear position sensor in the transmission. It's not calculated like some Yamahas do.

    Gustavo
  13. michaelkozera

    michaelkozera Long timer

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    Oddometer:
    1,434
    Location:
    calgary
    No idea what ur talking about. I ride year round here in the prairies of calgary alberta.

    Especially right now, its been about 10c all month and suppose to be about 10c all next month.
  14. bombdefuzer

    bombdefuzer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    232
    Location:
    Vietnam
    I also had a set delivered to my son who is riding my Triumph 800xc. I got that set for $147 on Amazon.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk
  15. bombdefuzer

    bombdefuzer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    232
    Location:
    Vietnam
    The first few rides the initial lean in felt really tippy like I needed to put my foot out. I think it is because of the rear tire height bu not sure. After a little time I got used to it and in a deep lean they are stable and I am much more confident with the grip as well.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk
  16. bombdefuzer

    bombdefuzer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    232
    Location:
    Vietnam
    I love the stealth of the stock pipe. There is nothing worse than sour looks from my neighbors and that awful drone on long trips.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk
    rideforzen and michaelkozera like this.
  17. bombdefuzer

    bombdefuzer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    232
    Location:
    Vietnam
    For gravel riding that distance I would feel more comfortable with a more agressive tire than the 705. To me there is nothing enjoyable in having a death grip for miles on end.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk
  18. bombdefuzer

    bombdefuzer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    232
    Location:
    Vietnam
    Yes Ken you are correct, the 705 is very similar to the Trail wing. I used the Trail wings on both my Africa Twins during rainy season in SE Asia as well. This is one of the reasons I got the 705s as the Wings aren't as readily available in Vietnam as the 705s.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk
  19. jgiacobbe

    jgiacobbe Long timer

    Joined:
    May 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    4,044
    Location:
    Near Richmond VA
    Love my 705s on my Vstrom. Did manage to lock both front and rear tires last night on the vstrom when a stopped car pulled into my lane when I was going 60 mph. Stayed upright and ended up passing on the left as there was not distance to stop.

    They are very heavy tires, at least in the vstrom sizes. Fore the rider who said they felt tippy, did you mount the front the wrong way? I did that once on my strom and felt like I was going to fall right over when turning. Normally they feel very neutral and don't require much pressure to keep the lean angle steady.

    I managed to get a deal on Conti trail attacks for the VX. Not a tire I expect to deal with more than graded forest roads with. I had the feeling if I put more agressive tires on it, I would get sucked into riding more off road than I like.
  20. bombdefuzer

    bombdefuzer Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    232
    Location:
    Vietnam
    Tires are both mounted correctly. I checked again after the first stop on the maiden voyage. The tires are much better now with some break in and familiarity with the cornering traits.

    Sent from my SM-N910G using Tapatalk