Kawasaki Versys-X 300

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by shyam334, Nov 8, 2016.

  1. Dfrnt

    Dfrnt Just pluggin' along Supporter

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    The rubber dampener and bolt for it extends downward and hits the top of the fork tube, more than likely.
  2. Dirtdeville

    Dirtdeville Been here awhile

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    Look near the middle of page one for ideas. https://advrider.com/f/threads/versys-300x-adventure-build.1274086/ I thought about using these eventually- https://www.highwaydirtbikes.com/index.php?app=ecom&ns=catshow&ref=HDB-450
  3. gorilla2891

    gorilla2891 Been here awhile

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    That's about the same rpm my Lady noted vibes before rubber strip was installed. Hope it works for you!
  4. flexiflyer

    flexiflyer Been here awhile

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    I would take the busters off and ride it to see if the vibes are there with just the bar change, I would also throw those waffle grips in the garbage while the busters were off :lol3
  5. blackgaard

    blackgaard Adventurer

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    I think I was just really into the idea of having a more off-road position for the pipe, all neatly tucked away... I did think about lowering the can, but there's that shield, and it would need a pretty long hanger (not that big a deal). I'm more concerned about lean angle, and I'd rather make an adapter than modify original parts, as a general rule, but I should probably look further down this path than the other (if any).

    t2.PNG
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  6. Dirtdeville

    Dirtdeville Been here awhile

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    I'm a little worried looking at that because the Yoshimura muffler sits so high.Has anyone combined that muffler with the Shad cases? I have both but installed neither because I haven't bought the mounting hardware.
  7. blackgaard

    blackgaard Adventurer

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    The Yosh in the pic is in the stock location.

    yosh.PNG

    Well, the bottom of it is. The top is a tad lower because it's smaller. (don't look at that pic too long, it's turning my stomach lol)

    Edit: Also, while I am sure this is deceptive with no load and whatnot, it would appear that the front of the OEM muffler is the close to the lean limit (the pic from the front in the same set shows a gap between the peg and muffler). So, basically, lean should not be any further limited so long as the back of the muffler isn't lower than the front, which would be silly anyway.

    angle.png
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  8. bisbonian

    bisbonian Long timer

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  9. blackgaard

    blackgaard Adventurer

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    Dude, that sucks... I'm so afraid of something like this happening all the time.

    FWIW, Fix-A-Flat is totally worthless aside from giving you nausea and a headache when you dismount (as well as a potential explosive rist, depending on formula, but I think they fixed that at least... though they are still yet to fix any flats...)

    (not claiming his methods are flawless or anything, but tires also used to be my job)

    Also, out of curiosity and since I've really only heard of using Gorilla Tape if not a specialized product - what 3M tape? Also, what do you do about spoke adjustment? Probably won't need tires till the end of next season, but when I do, I want to have made my judgement about whether (and how) I want to do the same...
  10. Northern_Rider777

    Northern_Rider777 Adventurer

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    I've been reading up on riding in gravel lately (the back roads here in Nova Scotia have a lot of it, deep and loose). There is a lot of info out there, and it gets a bit confusing regarding the various styles of riding, which is further complicated because of our bike's hybrid nature. Everything I say below is while on wet/loose material and from someone who is self-taught and reading/watching things online, with only 3 seasons (this one included) of riding (35K Kms), so I may be WAY off.

    For me (vertically challenged and an overpacker) , I feel the bike is too heavy to ride like a dirt bike (seated, with a leg out for balance/staying upright), so I've been using more ADV oriented resources, all suggesting I need to stand, take things slower, and use my body position to balance the bike (transferring all of my weight to one peg etc). Oh and not to lean into turns.

    I had a few slightly scary situations yesterday, trying to make some turns on roads with a couple inches of loose gravel. Everything I read/watched went out the window except for my safety course basics: smooth, gradual inputs and trying to relax. I was fine once I cut my speed to about 20-30 km/h. I was lucky no one was behind me. I hadn't lowered my tire pressure, as it was a bit low to start with and it was bit of an impulsive ride: 26 F, 30 R.

    What do you guys do in the loose gravel/mud? How fast should I be going in the straights? What is a good rule of thumb for cornering speed? Do you tend to ride in lower gears so you can ramp up the RPM and lighten the front tire?
  11. bisbonian

    bisbonian Long timer

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    I think it's the 3M 4411 or 4412 tape that people talk about in the Garage section. I had a friend who had just enough left over to get my rear wheel done.
    Some people put sticker dots over the spoke nipples before putting the tape down, others have used a dab of some silicone sealant over them. I just swung for the fences and put the tape on. To be honest, I've never adjusted a spoke on any bike I've ever had so didn't sweat it. Now I've probably jinxed myself, so there is that.

    The worst was the tire and tube each had about 1000 miles on them, basically new.
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  12. SoManyFish

    SoManyFish Been here awhile

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    Here is my two cents:
    - Do not ride with one leg out in a turn like an MX rider might. They do that to move weight forward (to improve traction on the front tire) and also to stabilize the bike in slow turns (three points of ground contact is more stable than two.). However, MX bikes are featherweights compared to Versys-X 300. On Versys-X moving your leg forward in a turn will have virtually no affect on front traction because the combined weight of rider and bike is much higher and shifting your leg forward will make little difference and if the bike falls you've got a good chance of breaking your leg.
    - Standing can be helpful if you are comfortable with it and if you understand the concept. Contrary to popular belief standing does not lower the centre of mass (of combined rider and bike) because that would violate the laws of physics -- it actually raises the combine centre of mass. However, what it does do is partially separates the centre of mass of the bike from the centre of mass of the rider which allows the rider to change the balance very quickly. Learning to confidently control the bike while standing takes time and practice -- start slow. Also, be aware that in some jurisdictions standing while riding a motorcycle is considered "stunting" or "dangerous driving" or similar resulting in a hefty fine and/or impounding of the vehicle so you might check your provincial/state regulations.
    - Speed? Whatever speed you are comfortable at. There is no rule of thumb because there are too many variables. I've gone as slow as 15-25 km down some gravel roads and as fast as 100 or more down others.
    - Cornering? Yes, avoid leaning the bike on turns because leaning transfers vertical force (downward) that creates traction to horizontal force (sideways) that breaks traction. On loose (or slippery) surfaces too little downward force + too much much horizontal force = washout. To keep the bike as vertical as possible, shift your body weight to the inside of the turn. Practice in a parking lot before you practice on gravel (or on a slippery surface such as tarmac covered with wet leaves).
    - Relax. Lots of riders have a death grip while riding on loose surfaces because they want to control the bike but that's the opposite of what you want. Consider that unless there is a substantial external force, the laws of physics dictate that while moving at anything more than a walking speed a motorcycle wants to keep going moving straight ahead. The motorcycle's geometry (e.g., rake, trail) and tire profiles are designed to maximize this tendency to keep going straight. Consequently when the front tire is deflected by a loose surface or a small obstacle, the bike may temporarily track off a straight path but the bike will self-correct that movement if it is given the chance. The thing is that if you've got a death grip then the bike cannot self-correct. On loose surfaces most of the deviations from a straight path are much smaller than they feel and the bike can correct them with no input from the rider. However, if you maintain a death grip on the handlebars then the rider, not the bike, must counter every deviation and the rider simply is not fast enough to do it. Loosen up your grip, relax your arms and shoulders, and trust the bike! And death grips are quickly fatiguing and result in slower reaction times.
    - If you are going to ride a lot on gravel, consider more aggressive tires -- I like Shinko 804/805. The effect of decreasing tire pressure tends to work better on some tires than on others.
    - Engine RPM? On loose surfaces I tend to ride with engine RPM higher than I would at that same speed on a hard surface.
    - Ascending or descending slopes on loose surfaces may require a change in body position and/or speed. Decending slopes on loose, deep surfaces can result in the front wheel sinking rather than rolling which usually doesn't turn out well. To avoid this, reduce weight on the front wheel by shifting body weight backing and/or accelerating (not too much, obviously).
    - And, no doubt I'm going to take some flack for it, Versys-X is not a "hybrid" bike but rather it's a street bike designed with geometry that is suitable for not-too-gnarly unpaved surfaces.

    One of the best resources that i have found online for ADV type riding is at the YouTube channel MOTOTREK -- the guy is a professional instructor and he explains riding technique in a way that always seems to make perfect sense. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWh6PvzNVeOmEU065h-8kUw
  13. dirtdreamer50

    dirtdreamer50 long time rider

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    That's more than 2 cents worth of info, more like a Buck and a quarter's. Rode off road for over 45 years and have to agree with you, especially the point of riding relaxed. Did much of my riding time standing on the pegs (no laws against back then). The main reason for me was I had better control in the loose stuff, and it allowed the bike to "work out" beneath me, reinforcing the need to relax. Also you can quickly lean forward or back, to change the traction of the tires when needed.

    Passed those days now, but still remember the necessary skills to make racing or even trail riding (think it's called single track riding today) much safer and more enjoyable. Best thing to do is get out and ride. You will learn or instinctively feel what are the correct ways for your style of riding. Good luck, and expect to go down sometimes. Just the nature of the sport/hobby/life thrill. tomp dd50
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  14. doogiepooch

    doogiepooch Long timer

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  15. Bt10

    Bt10 Been here awhile

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    May not have chosen "that" tire for gravel sideways grip, but all good tips. Thank you.
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  16. SoManyFish

    SoManyFish Been here awhile

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    Admittedly, the lateral grip on the 805 is not stellar but my riding style is not very aggressive so it isn't really an issue for me. I would like to try the new Bridgestone Battlax AX41 because it looks wicked and early reviews indicate it is a very good tire although perhaps a little short-lived: https://www.bridgestone.com/products/motorcycle_tires/products/detail/pr154/
  17. whisperquiet

    whisperquiet Motorcyclist Supporter

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    Looks like that nail is still usable.
  18. Northern_Rider777

    Northern_Rider777 Adventurer

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    Thank-you SoManyFish for taking the time to write that out! I will be saving that text so I can read it on my phone when out in the field, lol.

    I agree, Mototrek's videos are quite helpful, his videos were what clued me in that your typical big ADV bike has it's own riding style. I also like his jaunty cap. I am also a fan of Clinton Smout's videos, and I hope to visit his school in Ontario next season.

    I have a Shinko 705 rear to put on soon to match my Kenda 761 front (I read this was a good combo). I am contemplating taking both off and getting something knobbier so tires are not a variable during my learning. Your post has given me some inspiration to go out and ride some more and not be afraid to drop the bike, def need bark busters now!

    Bt10-thanks for the heads up on the 805s. I have been looking at those.
  19. jamboa

    jamboa jamboa

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    I put highway pegs on all my bikes no matter the model

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  20. jamboa

    jamboa jamboa

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