Kawasaki Versys-X 300

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by shyam334, Nov 8, 2016.

  1. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

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    As you have discovered, there are two seats for the Versys-X 300. The North American market gets the "low" seat, standard. I think the European market gets the "tall" seat, standard, but I can't confirm that.

    I believe that @Bullwinkle now has both seats. If so, perhaps he can measure the thickness of both at the rider position and let you know the measurements so you can check yours.

    ...ken...
  2. David JM

    David JM Been here awhile

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    Our 300's puts out about 11 hp. at 4000 rpms and about 31 hp. at 10,000 rpms. I would suggest using 1st. on those steep rocky hills. Also if someone is not hitting up over 10,000 rpms some of the time when going thru the gears, then your really missing out on a lot of hp. The 300 doesn't have a lot of torque, but it has pretty good zip if you use your rpms. If I'm turning on to a main road where everyone is doing 65 mph and I need to go fast quick, I will rev the bike up to 30 to 35 mph in 1st, then hit 2nd to about 50 mph, then 3rd to about 70 mph. This is the fastest way to come up to speed without hitting the rev limiter if your running a 15 T front sprocket. The rest of the time I just cruise around like everyone else, except when I need to pass, then it's all about down shifting 5th, 4th, 3rd, and I have even used 2nd a few times on back roads for quick passing. Quick is important to me, I don't want to spend any more time on the wrong side of the yellow line than I have to. It's not that hard to hit up to 85 mph if you need to when passing a single car that's doing 60 mph, even on an up grade when you use your gears and rpms.
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  3. Bullwinkle

    Bullwinkle Enthusiastic curmudgeon Supporter

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    Cheers @Josasu .
    Glad to oblige. Here's a photo of the 2 seats in close proximity. The "tall" seat is on the bike:
    VX300 Seats.jpg

    The first thing to notice is that the tall seat has a noticeable turn-up at the tank, while the low seat has none. The differences in key dimensions are as follows (A and B distances are as measured along the center axis of the seat):
    A (from the tank to the seam of the sitting surface): Low = 270mm, High = 320mm
    B (The size of the 'step', from the seat seam to the top of the step: Low = 150mm, High = 120mm
    C (The 'thickness' of the seating area vertically from the "V" at the bottom): Low = 110mm, High = 140mm

    Obviously these are approximate and could vary slightly from individual seat to seat. As can be seen, the tall seat is about 30mm (1 1/4") higher than the low seat and gives a little more fore/aft room for the rider's butt.

    FWIW, at 5' 10" (~1780mm), I find the tall seat gives me just enough fore/aft room to be comfortable enough for most purposes, and IMO, the seat is perhaps a little less firm than the low seat.

    As for Seat Concepts' fitting applications, I can't answer that, but keep us posted on your results.

    JP:beer
  4. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

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    Given the difference in physical dimensions, it's clear that a seat cover kit for one will not fit properly on the other. If Seat Concepts says their kit won't fit the "tall" seat, it appears they are only building it for the North American [and any other] market that has the "low" seat as standard.

    ...ken...
  5. Dfrnt

    Dfrnt Just pluggin' along Supporter

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    If it’s just a cover, then those measurements would confirm the fitment. However, if it’s not just a cover, but also new foam and matching cover, the critical dimensions would be on the seat base, not the existing foam.
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  6. Josasu

    Josasu VX300 2019

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    Thanks for your replys! Now I know I have tall version just by looking that photo. Gladly as I was reading your replys I got email from seat concepts and it says:
    "Our seat kit will fo on the factory tall seat also. You will just need to trim down the seat base plastic up at the tank to fit the pocket in the foam or cut the foam pocket bigger to fit the tall pan if needed."

    After this message I will order it. When I get it I will take it to professional upholsterer. I think he makes it fit good.
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  7. jspringator

    jspringator Long timer

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  8. Unhingedlizard

    Unhingedlizard Long timer

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    Its. So. Green

    Just a few kms to bring it home. So far the gf observations:

    - feels super light compared to the f650gs
    - still a bit tall
    - lots of stuff in front of your face (big cockpit)
    - need to get used to reving again

    My observations following on the 390
    - following is hilarious. Sounds like a million angry but very quiet bees
    - the 390 seems to have a much better spread of power in a drag race. It picks up quicker and holds the gear longer whereas the 300 revs out faster and needs more gear changes to get up to highway speed. 20201116_213558.jpg Off out again today
    manybike and Ken in Regina like this.
  9. David JM

    David JM Been here awhile

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    Try switching to a 15T front sprocket, you will be able to come up to speed much quicker and do it with 1 to 2 less shifts. Also all the gears, especially 1st thru 4th will feel more normal and be much more usable on the highway and backroads and in town. It should only cost about $20, and you don't have to change the length of your chain, just readjust it.
    Northern_Rider777 likes this.
  10. Unhingedlizard

    Unhingedlizard Long timer

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    Already has one but ta :)
  11. SoManyFish

    SoManyFish Been here awhile

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    You tighten the fastener to spec using a torque wrench and a correctly-sized hex bit. The torque spec is in the Service Manual. If you don't have a Service Manual then let us know and I will post the spec for you, or you could just look up the torque spec online using the size of the fastener (i.e., there are standard torque values for the various sizes of fasteners as in https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/metric-bolts-maximum-torque-d_2054.html). TBH I do not see how a lock washer would reduce vibration. The purposes of a lock washer is to minimize the possibility of the fastener coming loose. And if it is torqued properly it should not come loose. But if you are concerned about the fastener coming loose then put a small amount of blue or orange Loctite on the threads when you install the fastener.
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  12. acap650

    acap650 acap650

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    Just looking at the instructions they mention a 120mm long bolt, that's almost 5 in. long! Poor design to use a bolt that long, the plate should be supported by a proper bracket, not an overly long bolt with a spacer.
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  13. SoManyFish

    SoManyFish Been here awhile

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    Yeah, that would be an issue for me. The OEM bolt (rearward attaching grabrail-to-frame) is M8 x 73 mm and this product appears to have replaced it with an M8 x 120 mm. The grabrail-to-frame bolts go through the grabrail into threaded inserts welded into brackets (fabbed from thin-ish stamped steel) welded onto the frame proper. I am sure the brackets are strong enough to withstand any reasonable and expected force applied laterally (to the bolt's shank) near the head of the OEM bolt. However, if you apply the same force to 73 mm and 120 mm bolts, the resulting force transferred from the bolts to the bracket will be much higher in the case of the longer bolt. So, the question becomes: if a reasonable and expected force is applied laterally to the end of the 120 mm bolt, will the bolt transfer a force to the bracket that exceeds the amount of force the bracket is designed to withstand thus resulting in mechanical failure of the bracket?
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  14. jspringator

    jspringator Long timer

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    I noticed a vibration, and called AdventureTech. They claimed I was the first to complain. I thought maybe I was making a mountain out of a molehill, but after reading the above comments, I think the felt increase in vibration was real.

    Is there anything else that would work for small soft panniers? I might just sell these on eBay and go a different direction. I have Wolfman E12s.
  15. David JM

    David JM Been here awhile

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    Jspringator, If your sure the vibration is coming from the saddle bag support brackets then don't give up yet. I looked at your pics. and it looks like a nice set up. I bolted 3800 hard cases directly to my bike using the same bolt holes and a spacer without any problems. So my question is are the panels you bolted on metal? If they are then that would be where I would go to look for vibrations. First try putting a rubber or nylon washer under the panel on the front bolt. The soft plastic spacer on the back bolt should be good enough. If that doesn't work, then I would attach the bags to the panels to see if that deadens the vibration. If that dosn't work, then I would remove the metal panels and use them for a pattern to make panels out of plastic or plywood. If this works, don't worry about the back bolt, the strap that connects your soft bags together and goes over or under your seat will hold almost all of the weight of the bags and gear, The bags are attached to the panels just to prevent them from flopping around in the wind or getting caught in your spokes. The back bolt would be a lot stronger if it wasn't threaded all the way up to the head. Note if this works, and you wind up using one half inch ply. or plastic, then you may want to get a one half inch longer bolt for the front and basic lock washers.
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  16. jspringator

    jspringator Long timer

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    I’m going to give it a shot. It works fine without anything. I use clear cabinet paper to protect the paint.
  17. Ken in Regina

    Ken in Regina Long timer Supporter

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  18. BAGSTR

    BAGSTR One Project a Day

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  19. RedEX

    RedEX NeverSatisfied

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  20. Bullwinkle

    Bullwinkle Enthusiastic curmudgeon Supporter

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    Looks like a nice saddle. Any chance you could give us a side shot or two so we can see its profile?

    JP
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