Kifaru 4 man Tipi and medium stove review

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by Mr. Fisherman, Jun 9, 2008.

  1. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman Back in Black!

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12,948
    Location:
    Trying to tame the Snake!
    After much trial and tribulation I finally got to use my new to me Kifaru 4 man tipi and medium stove last night on the way home from the Hells Canyon run. I forgot my stakes at home... that sucked.
    Found 8 decent substitutes in Spray. Bought 8 more at the campground, but those sucked.
    Usually it takes 16 stakes to peg out the tipi. It is WELL worth the effort.
    Please forgive the 8 stake pitch, but even at that it was FANTASTIC!
    [​IMG]

    Plenty of room for gear, even with the stove installed...
    [​IMG]

    Both paniards on their kick stands make packing and unpacking very convient and as you can see there is plenty of room inside...
    [​IMG]

    I set up my Downmat Exped 9 DLX on a footprint from my HD2 and an emergency blanket... It was comfy... it was nice as you could just lift it up to take out a rock or stick if one were bugging you...
    [​IMG]

    And here is a shot of it all together...
    [​IMG]

    And with the bug screen closed...
    [​IMG]

    Having the stove in the tipi is just plain amazing!
    It rained hard last night and it was COLD. I lit a fire and stoked it for a while then slept like a bug in a rug... toasty and warm.
    In the morning I lit the fire from my sleeping bag and rolled over to sleep just a little more. It was FANTASTIC!
    I didn;t want to leave. It was raining and dismal outside but I was the most content I have ever been in a tent in the rain when it was cold. I could have stayed for days.
    The doors have a feature that allows you to have a screened window in each door. You can close the window without coming back inside to do it... I didn't get pics of the fire going casue the camera was on the bike and it was cold and raining outside... I was too comfortable to leave.
    The tipi, liner and stove is an expensive package but I am absolutly delighted and will use it every chance I get.
    The tipi and stove combo weigh in at just over 12# and packs easily on the GS. I love it.

    This morning was a muddy mess but I didn't have to worry about tracking in mud adn I didn't have to remove my boots.
    It was fantastic and I didn't want to leave.

    Everything was soaked when I left. I packed it in a mesh bag I got at REI. It worked great.
    #1
  2. AngryScot

    AngryScot .

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    18,439
    Location:
    ☼ Ca ☼
    :clap
    That is awesome!

    Adding to the tent/tarp and now tipi review thread!

    :thumb
    #2
  3. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman Back in Black!

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12,948
    Location:
    Trying to tame the Snake!
    Kewl...
    Next time I'll get a shot with a fire in the stove... man that is kewl!

    I have never been more comfortable in the rain and cold in a tent. I didn't want to leave!
    #3
  4. R_W

    R_W wannabe

    Joined:
    May 3, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,126
    Location:
    Kansas
    You should get the 16-man -- then you can park the bike inside, too :D

    Kif is GUUUD stuff.
    #4
  5. spidennis

    spidennis SandStorm Adventures

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,276
    Location:
    South Padre Island, Texas .... far from anything
  6. Super Suz

    Super Suz N00b with B00b

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,558
    Location:
    alrededor de la bahía
    Wow, that looks like it really works. But wait a minute, since I really am considering one, A few questions: :deal

    1. How did you keep rain from leaking into the ground floor of the teepee? Is it the amount of stakes that does it? That is a lot of stakes.

    2. Do you think you can use the teepee on an area where it cannot be staked, like say a cement floor? Perhaps using rocks instead?

    3. When putting away the stove, did you get all sooty? Did other stuff in your packed pannier get sooty? I know there is a bag that it gets stored in, but...?

    4. Did you get condensation on the inside?

    5. Can you use logs bigger than what you used or do you have to use little mini logs like what you chopped. Did you pack an axe?

    6. Can you heat up food or water on the stove?

    7. Can you stand up in it? Better question: How high is the inside?

    8. It looked cold and damp outside. Now the sleeping arrangement was a footprint, an air mattress with down inside the mattress and then an emergency blanket? Just an emerg blanket? That orange blanket was enough for the whole night to feel warm enough to stay asleep for the whole night long? Whaaaaat?? Well, Did you have to wake and stoke? (Please do not quote me on that question, guys).

    9. How long do you think it will take the average guy (or gal) to put it up after being used to it for a while?

    10. Did your teepee and the contents smell smoky in the morning?


    Last, let me say that the whole thing looks like a really great idea. I know that they are not cheap though. On Ebay, they are selling these patches of specially treated fabric and silicone holes so one can sew the patch into a tent and make their own stove-ready tent. But that's pretty risky if it fails.

    Acually, I have one more...:wink:

    Can I ask what that set you back?



    Thanks so much!

    Suzanne
    #6
  7. Super Suz

    Super Suz N00b with B00b

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,558
    Location:
    alrededor de la bahía
    I better spell check next time.
    #7
  8. stoney4vida

    stoney4vida Semper Fidelis

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,805
    Location:
    Kentuckee
    Very nice, I have always wanted to get one. may have to pull the trigger.
    #8
  9. AngryScot

    AngryScot .

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    18,439
    Location:
    ☼ Ca ☼
    #9
  10. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman Back in Black!

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12,948
    Location:
    Trying to tame the Snake!
    1. How did you keep rain from leaking into the ground floor of the teepee? Is it the amount of stakes that does it? That is a lot of stakes.

    It was muddy outside but inside was nice... Nature does its job and as long as there is a cover preventing the rain from falling the ground beneath dries out.

    2. Do you think you can use the teepee on an area where it cannot be staked, like say a cement floor? Perhaps using rocks instead?

    No, it must be staked out, at least in my opinion.

    3. When putting away the stove, did you get all sooty? Did other stuff in your packed pannier get sooty? I know there is a bag that it gets stored in, but...?

    The stove comes with gloves. I took the stove outside to dump the ashes then went inside to disassemble and pack. Nothing got sooty this way. There was a bit of residule soot in the stove pipe but it wasn't an issue and I just rolled it up using the provided gloves. Nothing got sooty at all, the storage bag is well thought out and the gloves kept it off my hands.

    4. Did you get condensation on the inside?

    There was condensation in the inside wall, but the liner was dry and this kept the tipi very pleasent inside even during driving rain in cold conditions. With the stove going it dries everything out, there is even a drying line for drying out clothes. It works well. It isn't strong enough for riding gear beyond gloves and things like shirts, but I put my riding pants and jackets over my paniards and they dried out nicely.

    5. Can you use logs bigger than what you used or do you have to use little mini logs like what you chopped. Did you pack an axe?

    You are limited by the door opening. You can burn longer logs and push them in when they burn through but this is a bit risky. I did have an axe and a saw to help cut wood to length. I found buying kindling was cheaper and worked great. In the wild just use sticks and limbs from dead trees and break them to size. Nothing over about 3 inches in diameter. You can control the heat by controlling the size and quantity of fuel you put in after you get a nice bed of coals going.


    6. Can you heat up food or water on the stove?
    Yes, it works great for that and you can save space on packing fuel and a seperate stove and just use free fuel.

    7. Can you stand up in it? Better question: How high is the inside?

    Not quite in the 4 man, but I am told you can in the 6 man. I have one now so stay tuned as I will be writing a review as soon as I can get a liner for it. Deminsions are on the Kifaru web site.

    8. It looked cold and damp outside. Now the sleeping arrangement was a footprint, an air mattress with down inside the mattress and then an emergency blanket? Just an emerg blanket? That orange blanket was enough for the whole night to feel warm enough to stay asleep for the whole night long? Whaaaaat?? Well, Did you have to wake and stoke? (Please do not quote me on that question, guys).

    It was cold and damp outside, but nice and comfy inside. The emergency blanket has a vapor barrier on one side and flannel on the other. I placed this on top of the foot print and put the Exped down mat on top of that. I used a flanel liner then the orange and black down filled quilt. It is actually a Hiker Biker quilt from Jacks are Better. When it is really cold I use a silk liner too. It was just fine for the night. The stove is stoked before turning out for the night but it only lasts for about 45 minutes to an hour. Plenty of time to fall asleep. In the morning just put your fire starter and kindling in the stove that was staged the night before and light it up from the comfort of your sleeping bag and hit the snooze bar... get up in about 15 minutes surrounded by warmth.


    9. How long do you think it will take the average guy (or gal) to put it up after being used to it for a while?

    15 to 20 minutes start to finish with the stove included. It is easy.


    10. Did your teepee and the contents smell smoky in the morning?

    No worse than the risidule camp fire smell from your clothes when camping. I kind of like it.

    I shopped around and got mine used. I have about 10 nights worth of hotel stays tied up in it. It is the older material but I like it.

    I hope this helps. It was a substantial purchase for me and I mulled it around and saved for over a year to get here... that and waiting for a deal.
    #10
  11. dirty_sanchez

    dirty_sanchez Dirty_Sanchez

    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    4,017
    Location:
    Louisiana, Baton Rouge
    Is the inside of the stove big enough to cook medium sized baked potatoE's

    Dirty Quayle
    #11
  12. R_W

    R_W wannabe

    Joined:
    May 3, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,126
    Location:
    Kansas
    They make 4 or 5 different stove sizes. The tiniest wouldn't hold a baked potato, but the largest is as big as a box stove--big enough to swallow full size fireplace logs. It would be easy to put a potato on the stovetop and then set a pot upside down on it to make an impromptu oven. We always used to set a pot or pan upside down, then put the coffee pot on top of that as our "warming plate"
    #12
  13. Chip Seal

    Chip Seal Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2004
    Oddometer:
    3,341
    Location:
    Western Orygun
    Oh man, I am wanting one so bad...
    #13
  14. spidennis

    spidennis SandStorm Adventures

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,276
    Location:
    South Padre Island, Texas .... far from anything
    it's stated as a 4 man/person but how many can actually sleep in it?

    Can it be used with cots?
    #14
  15. R_W

    R_W wannabe

    Joined:
    May 3, 2005
    Oddometer:
    4,126
    Location:
    Kansas
    they size their tents using "normal backpacker standards" meaning you can fit 4 sleeping bags on the floor and maybe a little stuff in the corners. so two comfortably.

    I don't know if the 4 man is big enough for a regular cot, maybe one of the high-tech cots or others that are only a couple inches off the ground.

    I have wanted one of their tipis for SO long, but can never justify it. I did just spend my "incentive" check on one of their uber-stout military backpacks.
    #15
  16. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman Back in Black!

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12,948
    Location:
    Trying to tame the Snake!
    Whar R W said... seems to be about the same with rafts... 4 man = 2 men and gear. To get enough room for a big cot you would likely have to step up to the 8 man. The smaller tipis are easier to heat and take up less room. The foot print on the 4 man is like 14 feet by 10 feet. Due to the slope of the walls a lot of that room is on the parameter but you can still use it for gear and stuff.

    My grandpa always preached... "never be afraid to buy the best, you won't regret it". I was aprehensive about this purchase but took my time and found a great deal on a used one. Now that I have used it I don't regret it one bit. If fact, I am eager to get out and use it some more.
    #16
  17. blackie

    blackie Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    434
    Location:
    Cowgary, AB
    That is one interesting setup!
    What was the size of the stove you used?:1drink
    #17
  18. Mr. Fisherman

    Mr. Fisherman Back in Black!

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Oddometer:
    12,948
    Location:
    Trying to tame the Snake!
    I have a medium stove.
    #18
  19. AngryScot

    AngryScot .

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    18,439
    Location:
    ☼ Ca ☼
    Guess putting it in the subject was not good enough huh?
    :lol3 :D
    #19
  20. blackie

    blackie Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Oddometer:
    434
    Location:
    Cowgary, AB
    :hide Ummmmmmmm

    Where's me glasses......:shog
    #20