Kim & Mike's Most Excellent Planet Ramble

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Ride2ADV, Jun 5, 2016.

  1. skinny5216

    skinny5216 Adventurer

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    Really enjoying your ride report. Thanks for posting, it really is great. I'm just sorry I can't contribute to much :-)
    #81
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  2. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    No worries skinny5216, we're glad you are enjoying it and that you let us know that you are. There will be another update today. Mike & Kim
    #82
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  3. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    The following morning we headed out of Shell, WY on a beautiful summer morning. Bright sunshine greeted us and for a change the weather looked awesome! Along the way, we found a bit of Wyoming history. In the middle of a field sat what looked to be a church. As I rode by, I saw that there was a bell tower but no church like steeple. There also appeared to be a large sign beside the building and I was curious to see what it said.

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    I told Kim I wanted to stop for a closer look and she agreed. We did a 180 and found that the building was not only a church, but was actually the oldest one room school house remaining in Wyoming.

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    Turns out that it is on The National Register of Historic Places.

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    This little school house sat quietly alongside another building that looked to be much older and was quite dilapidated.

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    The remains of farming equipment that perhaps helped settlers make a living from the earth surrounded it.

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    When you looked at the surrounding landscape, you got a feel for how difficult it must have been to use the earth to sustain yourself and your family. I couldn't help but wonder what went on inside the walls of this little home on a vast prairie. Time had taken its toll, but the little ranch was still able to tell a story.

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    The view that these people woke up to each morning must have made them feel small in significance.

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    After a brief stay, we jumped back on the bikes and rode for a couple of hours taking it all in.

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    It was kind of surreal. In the brief time we were on the bikes for the day, we had covered a distance that would have taken settlers days to travel. Before long we had gone from vast open prairie, to city life, complete with traffic signals.

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    The following day was similar to the last, but the prairies began to resolve into more hilly terrain. We passed through dozens of similar towns as we made our way westward.

    Grain elevators dotted the landscape sitting next to a solitary rail. You could imagine a single train stopping at each elevator and taking on its load, town after town after town...

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    The weather was still good and our pace was excellent. Soon we would reach Montana. It was in the tiny town of Lavina, Montana that we got a little piece of Americana. A single quarter mile long main street passed right through the center of town. On this street was a building that looked to be a town hall.

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    It was One Main Street. Red, white and blue bunting decorated a large upstairs porch that ran the length of the building. Above, a small clock that still worked, kept time for the townspeople. The remainder of Main Street consisted of about six buildings on one side of the street.

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    Parked in front of the buildings was an indicator that we were indeed in the west with lots of cattle. A large semi trailer labeled with "Cow Tran" waited outside for new occupants.

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    Back on the road again, we saw signs that were were headed for the mountains.

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    Until later!
    #83
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  4. Mudclod

    Mudclod Mojo Moto

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    Outstanding images of the school. Imagine that view everyday!
    #84
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  5. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Riding across Montana was amazing. We found signs of the 1800s gold rush including ore car tracks once used to move earth for gold extraction. This section was interesting because the track seemed to end suddenly with no place to go.

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    We're not sure what these tunnels are all about, but they did run under some of the same ore tracks.

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    There were also signs that it was not an easy life for both humans and animals. I'm not sure what species of bird this was (perhaps a turkey vulture), but even being a scavenger is difficult.

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    Riding along two lane roads with 75 MPH speed limits, we were on guard for any animal that could end up in the middle of the road.

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    After about 4 hours on the road, we decided to take a break and check out the Flathead River.

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    We were now on tribal lands so certain rules had to be followed.

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    We took off our 'Stichs and took a short walk. There were a couple of signs that told a story of the land and what their place names meant.

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    Not far away were a couple of ancient picnic tables and we sat and chatted about the day's riding. After about half an our, we headed back to the bikes to resume our journey. When we arrived at the small dirt parking lot we found...

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    Upset that her bike had unilaterally decided to take a nap, Kim made sure he knew who the boss was!

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    Then she smiled about it...

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    If you looked at the first fallen bike pic closely, you may have noticed that Kim's helmet suffered as a result of the bike's nap time. We found it lying on the ground about three feet away from its original place. Hanging loosely at its side was the Sena 10C cam/communicator, its mount broken and useless.

    I'm sure you all know that duct tape is a wonderful thing. So using assets at hand, we performed some precision field repairs and the cam/com was like new. Well sort of...

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    But my masterful field repairs did work so we suited up and thought we would be soon back on the road. Wrong. Kim's DR has a strange habit. It likes to sleep on its side, but once sleeping, does not really want to awaken. I cranked it several times and he refused to start. It was almost like it was thinking, you woke me up from my nap and now I am going to make you pay. I did all sorts of starting procedures and the engine just cranked but would not start. I was about to pull the plug (thinking it might be wet) but it finally cranked to life. It was sort of a bike payback. BTW, can you tell that Kim is a big hockey fan?

    Back on the road, the landscapes were just amazing!

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    Fluffy clouds above cast moving shadows upon the land below. Changing the landscape as they flew past.

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    Rolling along, we passed more and more animal warning signs. In places, apparently the animal population was so dense, that the road was fenced at both side so that animals could not get to/cross the road. However, every few miles, there were animal "overpasses" that would let them pass from one side of the road to another without having to cross the actual roadway. They looked like road overpasses, but were actually for the animals.

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    If you look closely, you can see the fencing at both the side of the road and across the overpass. We didn't see any animals this time, but we soon would.

    Until later!
    #85
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  6. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Well we could only have so much good weather. The following morning dawned drearily with drizzle and low hanging clouds. Wonderful. But we decided to still head outside and check out Glacier National Park and its Going to the Sun Road. It turned out that it was a good decision to go since the weather cleared as the day progressed.

    Starting out, it was quite dreary but the further we rode, the better the views. The beginning of the Going to The Sun Road was a bit
    anticlimactic. We'd read lots about the sinuous, and winding nature of the road, and so far there were only trees and mountains about.

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    But before long, the road started to rise and the trees dwindled and the guardrails disappeared. Now were were seeing what we had read about. The road was so twisty and the drop offs so steep, that this is the only road that I have ridden where cars voluntarily traveled way below the speed limit of 35.

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    (check out my speed on the GPS. I couldn't go any faster and maintain distance between vehicles.)

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    Here's what it's like...



    There were also some cool tunnels...

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    It was kind of "cool" :D that in July, there was still quite a bit of snow on the ground.

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    We made new friends while there...

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    He didn't have much to say though.

    About half way across the road, the weather started to get much better. It was about this time that the scenery seemed to sparkle.

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    All in all it was a good road to ride. One unfortunate part was that there was very heavy traffic on the road. For me it took away a lot of enjoyment from the scenery. But not to worry, on the way back to where we were staying, we found another lightly traveled road (I think it was Route 49 which is seasonal). I has a gigantic sign warning motorcycles to consider other routes, but it wasn't really a big deal. It is VERY bumpy and there are sections of the road that are littered with loose gravel falling from the mountains. It's also clear that the winter does a number on the road and it is repaired each spring. As a result, there are lots of patches that are not necessarily smooth. But it is worth a ride, it has scenery similar to the Going to The Sun Road and those amazing drop-offs without guardrails. For me, it was better than the Going to The Sun Road.

    Here's a tidbit of Route 49 for you...



    Until later!
    #86
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  7. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    The following morning dawned sunny and we made our way further northwest. At this point we decided to take a brief break from riding to a new destination each day. Using the web, we found a 40 acre ranch in Thompson Falls, Montana that looked like a great place. We signed up for a 4 day stay and headed out.

    Once again there were gorgeous rolling hills and mountains. We'd been riding about 3 hours when we came across an abandoned old general store.

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    It looked like it had been closed for quite some time, but just across the gravel parking lot stood another "store". It was a thrift store of sorts complete with everything you would need to make a home and work on a ranch. Among the items were...

    Some pretty fancy saddles...

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    Including some for men...

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    And for women...

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    There was also some hand made jewelry.

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    Sorry for the crappy pic, but these things were amazing. The frame of the earring was made out of a folded spring and the color you see is actually thread that is hand woven around the spring. I had never seen anything like it. I asked the clerk if they were made locally. She shook her said and simply said, Peru. They were really amazing and were only $5.00.

    While walking around another bike pulled up and parked next to ours. I didn't see where the rider went off to or I would have chatted with him/her. But it certainly looked like he/she was on a long trip or moving.

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    I don't think I've ever seen a bike in the US that heavily loaded.

    Upon arrival, the welcoming committee came out to greet us.

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    We asked them if they wanted a ride on the bikes and they declined. They said they were too chicken...

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    Well anyway, the ranch house was gorgeous and we had the entire downstairs of their 3000 square foot house to ourselves. Nice!

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    The owner, Cindy actually did come out to greet us and showed us around downstairs. We couldn't have been made to feel more at home. Each night, friends came around to visit, graze and eat cherries.

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    After settling in, we decided to take a walk into town for dinner. If you think you'd like to stay at this place, PM me and I'll give you all the details.

    It was a quiet, relaxing walk. While on our walk, we soon met some additional residents. There were 3 horses in a paddock beside the road. We called them over and they were more than happy to chat.

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    Well, two were happy to chat while one quickly became bored with us and walked off.

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    Anyway, we spent some time with the two more friendly guys. They were both beautiful, but one was quite startling.

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    One of them, let's call him "Frank" must have been the lady's man of the paddock. He had the bluest eyes I have ever seen on a horse.

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    I was just waiting for him to start singing "New York, New York".



    He whinnied, but never really sang. Damn, we were too late for the show. Anyway, we continued our walk into town and walked through the local park called Island Park. So named because a converted railroad bridge now acts as a foot bridge between the two sides of the Clark Fork river and an island in the middle.

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    That's the island on the far side of the bridge. You then walk across the island and take another shorter bridge.

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    Which may or may not have some locals walking across.

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    Oh yeah, and the views from both bridges were pretty good...

    From the longer bridge...

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    From the shorter bridge...

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    Oh and I guess its a good idea to pay attention to the water level.

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    Ultimately we made it into town and had dinner... and dessert...

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    That night Cindy and her husband Mark invited us to sit around a fire and eat s'mores with them and their family. We visited for a few hours and ate s'mores. It was a great evening.

    Until later!
    #87
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  8. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    The following day was a rest day of sorts. We hung around the house most of the day and decided to sample some of the sights and fruit on the ranch. Cindy's and Mark's property was loaded with fresh raspberries and cherries and they encouraged us to pick some and gave us a bowl to put them in. Just a short 2 minute walk from our door, was their garden. We found their raspberry bushes and started to pick. They were full of fruit.

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    Next up was their cherry tree and it was literally bursting with ripe cherries.

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    This was the view from under their cherry tree. Pretty nice huh?

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    Ultimately, we ate a lunch of raspberries, cherries and power bars. It was pretty yummy!

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    Did we mention that they had a nest of bald eagles with two adolescents at the edge of their property? Sorry for the crappy shots, but I was using my small point and shoot camera.

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    After lunch, we strolled over to the Cindy and Mark's to visit with their horses.

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    The day was a great "rest" day and we looked forward to tomorrow since we would be venturing into the dirt and gravel roads of the Coeur d' ALene state forest fire roads in the Idaho State Forest.

    Oh and BTW, if you are interested in living in Montana and buying their lovely ranch, you can find further info by clicking HERE...

    Until later!
    #88
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  9. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    The following day dawned drizzly and dreary, but the forecast called for better weather in the afternoon. So we decided to head on over to Idaho and run through some of the fire roads in Idaho's Coeur d' Alene state forest. To get there, once again we would ride through Thompson pass which goes through the Lo Lo National forest. As we got higher, the clouds got lower.

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    As we descended down the pass, the rain started to diminish. Nice!... We had been told about the tiny town of Murray and that there was an interesting museum called the Sprag Pole museum there. Well since we were in town and the museum was actually in the back of a small restaurant, we decided to get lunch and check out the museum. Neither the lunch or the museum disappointed us. It was really an eclectic mix of history items and collectibles that the owner had collected over the years. Here's a sampling...

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    (handmade hand in a box)

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    (ammunition collection)

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    (bear trap - sorry I didn't put something in the picture for scale, but believe me, it was HUGE!)

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    (wooly mamoth tooth)

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    (miner in a geode)

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    (medicine collection)

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    (need some medical help? Just check out the price list.)

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    (replica of Maggie Hall bedroom with her actual furniture and items.)

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    (The story of Maggie Hall is a very interesting one. If you have a couple of minutes and you want to know more, click here.

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    (since Murray, Idaho was a gold rush town, there were plenty of mining "accessories")

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    (after the gold ran out, logging was also a big industry and there were several exhibits including an exhibit on the Great Fire of 1910 which was a huge wildfire that consumed over 3 million acres and killed 87 people. More info by clicking here. Because of this fire, the U.S. Forest Service which was on the verge of cancellation, was solidified and became a national organization.)

    Oh, and while we were in Montana, we saw this U.S. Forest Service ad which we had never seen before. It's pretty funny...



    We had a lot of fun at the Sprag Pole museum, but the Coeur d' Alene forest was calling us, so we finished our lunch and got going. The forest was a boat load of fun. Fire roads ran everywhere, and they were generally in excellent condition. There were a few soft muddy spots along the way because of the recent rain, but overall, it was excellent riding.

    Along the way to the forest, there was some excellent scenery with rivers apparently full of trout.

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    (well I guess my worm drowing skills aren't welcome here. :D)

    Before long, we would soon be entering the forest.

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    Once inside the forest, the riding was superb! Two track dirt roads took us along side rivers and over mountains, sometimes at the edge of a ridgeline with very steep drop offs. It was amazing. But sorry, my pics do not do the scenery justice.

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    https://photos.smugmug.com/Planet-Ramble/07-09-2016/i-pfttLxH/0/X3/20160709_155851_001-X3.jpg

    To give you an idea of what the riding was like, check out this helmet cam video. Don't bother with the whole thing, but skip around. You'll get a picture of what it was like.
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    (BTW, yes we do chat like this when we are riding. :arch :getiton)

    We would have stayed until it was getting dark, but after about 4 hours of riding in the forest, the weather started looking grim. So we decided to head back to Montana and it turned out that it was a good decision.

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    Until later!
    #89
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  10. tengoal

    tengoal Adventurer

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    FANTASTIC! ...but these reports are not coming fast enough! I want more!!!!
    #90
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  11. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Matt, we'll try to do better in the future. One will be coming up today! Mike
    #91
  12. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    By the time we had gotten back to the ranch (literally), the rain had washed off most of the Coeur d' Alene forest mud.

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    But there was still some evidence of the fun we'd had the day before.

    Today was the day that we were going to leave the US and head for Canada. We'd retrace some of our previous days travels through Idaho and enter Canada via the border between the US and British Columbia. It wasn't long before we made it back into...

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    Our stay in Idaho would be very short lived, probably about 1 1/2 hours until we made it to the border. But we did have a bit of a learning opportunity. Just before the border, we rode the Wild Horse Trail Scenic Byway. The road was curvy with lots of elevation change, leading us to the top of the mountain. Just before descending again, there was a large scenic pull off area that overlooked the surrounding valley.

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    At the site was a large sign that told the story of the Kootenai Tribe, a local tribe that had previously lived on land that was only designated by them. When the European white men came the Kootenai were friendly to them. Before long, the white men had declared a line separating the lands; the US and Canadian borders. The Kootenai continued to lose land until 1974 when the Kootenai declared war on the US. Ultimately, through this peaceful war, the Kootenai were deeded 12.5 acres of what used to be their own land by the US Government. You can read the whole story here...

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    The story of the development of the border is even stranger. The US and Britain agreed in 1842 to set the border as the 49th parallel. Both countries then commenced surveying the land over the years and the surveying was completed in 1862, twenty years after it first started. In 1859 the British wanted to mark the border with monuments every mile. The US refused to bear the cost for this so ultimately the British and US agreed on iron markers which would be provided at British expense. After 20 years of surveying and wrangling, BOTH the US and British reports we lost and never fully published. 30 years later, the British found their report by accident. I guess things never change in Government.

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    Not long after leaving the top of the mountain, we were at the Canadian border.

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    #92
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  13. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Soon we were in British Columbia.

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    Mountains were coming again...

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    By the end of the day, we would end up in the town of Radium Hot Springs, but not before running the length of the Icefields Parkway. The morning started out as what else? Rain...

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    But as the day wore on, the rain lessened at at times we had partly cloudy skies and sometimes some great scenery. We stopped at a few scenic vista areas and found that the water color in some of the lakes surrounded by the mountains was nothing less than spectacular.

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    Although the scenery was great, I must admit that it was spoiled for me somewhat by the very heavy traffic and large RVs both ahead and behind us. But it was what I had expected (but had hoped it would not be), traffic laden and hectic with all the summer tourists jockeying for the same piece of real estate at the same time. I knew that this would be the case, after all, it was the middle of the summer tourist season. I had just hoped that it wouldn't be spoiled, but unfortunately for me, it was. I was already longing for wide open spaces with little to no traffic. I kept myself happy by remembering it wouldn't be long before we were in very lightly populated areas. So for me, the Icefields Parkway was beautiful, but all but ruined by all the traffic.

    By the end of the day, we reached our stop for the night, Radium Hot Springs. While there, we met a fellow rider named Masa Ellis who had ridden here from the Portland, Oregon area. We chatted for a while and decided to have dinner together. We talked about riding and where we'd both been. It was a great evening. Here's a couple of pictures of Masa and Kim in the motel parking lot. If you look closely, you can see that it had started to rain. Again...

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    After dinner, we both returned to the motel and turned in for the evening.
    #93
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  14. LadyFish4

    LadyFish4 Adventurer

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    Hi, you two! I actually did a search looking for your report. I recall awhile back hearing of Kim getting sick, you flying home (with the mention of Kim being better, good news!) and your hopes of getting back on the road this Fall. I am hoping that Kim has fully recovered from whatever ailed her and that you're back on your adventure now! Selfishly, I've missed following you and hope you're continuing on! If so, I look forward to reading of your latest escapades :)
    #94
  15. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    We checked out of Radium Hot Springs headed towards Mount Robson in what else? Rain.

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    But it wasn't that long until the rain started to subside and we were riding on wet but drying roads.

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    Along the way, we briefly decided to check out some lesser roads for a quick look around both on and off the bikes.

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    We found a rushing river near Mount Robson that was pretty cool. By the color of the water, we assumed that it was powered largely by melt water from the surrounding mountains.

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    We were having fun so we hammed it up a bit...

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    Before long, we had made it to the Mount Robson Park area with mountains and brief glimpses of sun coming in and out the clouds.

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    We found a rather nice B&B and decided to call it quits for the day. They were off the beaten path which suited us just fine. Soon we were parked in their gravel driveway and shown to a room with a porch. On the porch were several hummingbird feeders. Once we had dropped our gear off, we sat on the porch with drinks and watched them flit in and out. Literally, there were 10s of them at a time feeding at the several hanging feeders.

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    We ate dinner with the residents and decided to walk around the property. Once again there was a beautiful river (I'm going to guess it was the same one) as well a the towering Mount Robson coming in and out of the clouds.

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    This is probably the clearest shot I got of it.

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    We had dinner with the residents and turned in for the evening. The following morning was still somewhat overcast with rain and of drizzle at times. Our destination for the day was to be Vanderhoof, BC.

    More soon!
    #95
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  16. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,446
    Location:
    If we haven't been there, it's on the list.
    When we awoke the following morning it was overcast but the forecast was for better weather and thundershowers near our destination for the day, Vanderhoof. So we got underway and hoped for better weather.

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    For a while, things did clear up and the riding was quite pleasant. It was near lunch time, towns were pretty scattered and far between, so when we came upon the town of McBride, BC, we decided to stop. It was a nice little town that had its origins in the lumber industry and the trains that supported that industry. In town near the railroad tracks was the railroad station. While it did still service the lumber industry, the passenger trains of times past were pretty much gone.

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    (picture on the side of the train station).

    But inside the station was a little restaurant and a museum.

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    We grabbed a bite to eat and then took a walk through the museum. It was full of the things you'd expect to find in a small town museum such as town history, photos and artifacts. But there was also some cool info about the truly ancient history of the area. It turns out that nearby, there was a very significant geological finding.

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    At the foot of the Roberts glacier lies a tilted piece of sedimentary rock from the ocean floor nearly 6,000 feet above sea level. This sedimentary bedrock was heaved up through the centuries and tilted on its side so that you can see all the layers of sediment that used to lie at the sea bottom. Amazing.

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    Back on the bikes, we stopped at a small rest area and found that we were standing in an inland Temperate Rain Forest. It was cool to think that this area of BC was home to cedar trees over 1,000 years old.

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    As we made our way northward, we found that fishing was a big deal for the residents of Houston, BC. In fact it was so big, that as a community, they build the world's largest fly fishing rod.

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    It was pretty impressive. Note my bike under the rod for comparison purposes.

    Back on the bikes, the weather started building and we could see thunderheads building in our path. We turned up the gas a bit and made it into Vanderhoof with about 20 minutes to spare.

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    It wasn't long until the rain was falling hard. By the time it was getting dark, the weather was starting to clear and the moon made itself know through the mist and haze.

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    Until later!!
    #96
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  17. rebelmark

    rebelmark Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2016
    Oddometer:
    95
    Sub'd!
    #97
    Ride2ADV likes this.
  18. patiodadio

    patiodadio Motorcyclist

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    384
    Location:
    Backwoods of Kentucky
    Great Ride Report ! You guys got it made !
    #98
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  19. RockyNH

    RockyNH Older Than Dirt!

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    1,124
    Location:
    Georgia Coast!
    Excellent report as always!
    #99
    Ride2ADV likes this.
  20. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,446
    Location:
    If we haven't been there, it's on the list.
    As the evening darkened, the moon came out and peeked through the mist.

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    We had a great night's sleep at a family run motel called the "Robber's Roost". Everything was excellent and in the morning after a hard afternoon rain, we awoke to our covered bikes which had been covered by the owners with old towels so we could wipe the bikes off! We hadn't asked for them and they just sort of magically appeared courtesy of the owners! We also met another bike traveler while there; Volker Totzauer who has traveled much of the world in the 1150GS you see here.

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    We were happy to see that although the pavement was still a bit wet, things were drying out and it was looking like a good riding weather day. We were heading up the Cassair Highway today with an overnight stop at the Tatogga Lake Resort in Tatogga, British Columbia. Unfortunately, the weather decided not to cooperate and we rode the whole day in some rain and overcast. The biggest bummer is that we heard the scenery and mountains were spectacular and because of the weather, we were missing out on it. Damn! For this reason, there are no good pictures of the day's riding.

    When we finally did arrive at the Tatogga Lake Resort, we were bumming. But we thought a nice room and a good dinner would be nice. We checked in and when we got to the room, we were in for a letdown. Not that the place was unlivable, it was in fact dry and warm. Unfortunately, it was filthy and poorly outfitted. We threw our gear on the bed and took a look around at our "Resort" room.

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    Hmm... nice fitting bedspread.

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    What the f$%# is that stain on the headboard?

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    Well at least there's a bathroom with toilet paper! But when I went in side, there was turd in the bowl. GROSS!!! I've spared you the picture of that. :flush :knary :nah

    So that was a bit of a letdown, but we still wanted something to eat other than powerbars and nuts, so walked over to the resort restaurant. Now that was a treat. We walked in the main door and found this...

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    Well that wasn't the whole scene, so let me zoom out for you.

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    Still want more? OK, how about this...

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    So I guess it's fair to say that the hunting is good in the area? It was a prime example of the fact that everything is big up north. Including the dishes of food. OMG there was a lot of it. It was expensive (think $30 for pancakes and eggs) but there was enough food on our plates to feed an army. Considering the northern latitude we were at, it was a bargain. Sorry, I was so shocked, that I failed to take pics of it. :becca

    After dinner, we turned in for the night. When we got up the next morning, the weather was gorgeous! We were totally psyched. We ate another gigantic meal and basically ran for the bikes for the ride to Watson Lake, Yukon. We were not to be disappointed. Not 10 miles up the road, we came upon this...

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