Kim & Mike's Most Excellent Planet Ramble

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Ride2ADV, Jun 5, 2016.

  1. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    I can't say enough about this view. Since it was this beautiful here, I wondered what we had missed on our first section of the Cassiar.

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    I could have probably stopped and stared at this scene all day, but we wanted to get to Watson Lake, so after about an hour, we got on the bikes and moved on.

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    There was a fair amount of construction ongoing, and some fairly lengthy stretches of gravel made the traveling more fun despite the dust created by some of the heavy equipment working and traveling the road.

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    Pete S, RideDualSport.com and juno like this.
  2. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    As we traveled further north on the Cassiar, we cam across a small town that I had never heard of; Jade City. I'm sure you can guess why it's called Jade City and your are correct, Jade is mined there and there is ongoing mining operations in the area. Set up on the side of the road was a small store and some booths displaying final jade pieces as well as the cutting process for Jade.

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    And on the other side of the road...

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    While walking around, we found two other bikes riding in the opposite direction. We chatted and exchanged info and I even wrote it down, but I promptly lost their names and so I apologize guys. If you see this thread, chime in and let us know how to contact you again!

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    The rest of the day's riding was beautiful as we had anticipated.

    We rode long stretches of deserted road framed by mountains and lakes. Awesome stuff!

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    There were many animal collision warning signs, but this day we did not see any...

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    Approximately 7 hours later, we were crossing into the Canadian Yukon...

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    ...and not far from Watson Lake where the famous Signpost Forrest is located.

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    Not long after this picture was taken, we were making the turn from the Cassair to the Alcan Highway. We did want to see the Signpost Forrest, so we made the left turn towards Watson Lake.

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  3. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    We did make it to Watson Lake and stayed at a converted World War II Air Force barracks called interestingly enough, The Historic Air Force Lodge. The owner Mike and his wife has run the lodge for years and live in a bus in the back of the property. Mike couldn't have been more welcoming. The lodge is still "barracks like" with the toilets and showers being in a separate area of the lodge, but overall, we had a really nice stay! Now that we were in Watson Lake, we had to stop and see the famous Sign Post Forrest. It is a very cool place.

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    A soldier named Carl Lindley from Danville, IL started the forest in 1942 while working on the construction of the Alaska Highway. He added his hometown sign to an Army mileage post and from there, the tradition of placing signs from all over the world started and it is now a very large forest. I'd guess about 3 acres worth. We'll show you more...

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    We'll show you more... I won't add much in the line of narrative, but will try to give you an idea what's it's like...

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    And here are a few from places nearby from where we have lived and now live...

    We lived in the town next to Nashua, NH when we lived in NH.

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    I have a very good friend that now lives here...

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    (New London, NH)

    We now live in Vermont and this Route is probably one of the more well known and has some excellent curvy sections...

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    We now live very close to this town, best known for the Killington Ski Resort...

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    Oh what's that sticker on the sign you may ask? A Ride2ADV sticker? What do you know, that's my blogsite's sticker. I wonder how that got there? :y0! :lol3

    Another Vermont sign... VT's state capital I might add...

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    Some very northern Maine...

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    ...and how about some non-North American country signs?

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    There were plenty more non-North American signs, but apparently I didn't take pics of them.

    More soon!!!
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  4. motor_roy

    motor_roy Been here awhile

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    That was Lenin and myself (Mark) you met in Jade City!!!
  5. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Mark!!! Thanks so much for chiming in! I felt like an idiot that I forgot your and Lenin's names. Hope you are doing well and that you have some more riding planned. All the best, Mike and Kim
  6. Mudclod

    Mudclod Mojo Moto

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    That sign forest is too cool. I would spend awhile there for sure!
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  7. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Also in the Signpost Forest, are some pieces of construction equipment that were used in the making of the ALCAN Highway. It is difficult to imagine how hard it must have been to carve it though and around the mountains of the Yukon and Alaska.

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    All in all, the Signpost Forest made an excellent memento of the people and things that were done to connect the Canadian Yukon to Alaska.

    We stayed for about an hour and a half and decided that we had to get going. We wanted to make a good dent in the ride to Alaska, so we hopped back on the bikes and got underway. The ALCAN gave us long stretches of beautiful solitude and mountain views.

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    Along the way, we hit a fair amount of construction including this wire bridge just before we entered a small town...

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    We waited a few minutes and made our way into town to fill up with fuel.

    Just before the first gas station, we came upon the first RCMP cruiser we had seen in days. It was parked at the side of the road of the gas station seemingly running radar.

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    On closer inspection, it wasn't running radar. In fact, it wasn't even a cruiser.

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    You have to admit, it was a pretty novel way to get people to slow down and check out your gas station!

    Filled with fuel we got back on the road with mounting clouds.

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    Luckily for us, we made it to Whitehorse, Yukon before the weather hit. It rained overnight, but when we awoke, it was overcast but no rain was falling.

    Our first stop for the day was in Destruction Bay, Yukon. It was impressive with growing overcast and a variably blue sea. We stopped at a small beach area and walked around a bit. Of course, we had to take the obligatory selfie.

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    We walked around the beach for a while and tried to squeeze in the majesty of the surrounding mountains and the changing water color. I didn't do such a good job, but I hope this will give you an idea of what it was like.

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    More later!
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  8. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Here's a panoramic shot of Destruction Bay... (click on the picture and you'll get a moving panoramic shot).

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    Just outside of Destruction Bay, we found a place for some fuel and a small general store. It seems that a lot of ADVers go through the area.

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    It seems we come from all over the world...

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    Back on the bikes we followed the ALCAN for what seemed a very long time. Bumpy chip seal for miles and miles. While the scenery was good, it was a somewhat boring ride. We did make a few stops along the way to munch on power bars and nuts, sometimes next to some pretty nice places.

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    Since it was the dead of summer, some flowers were just starting to bloom.

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    As we traveled, the weather started coming in. Dark heavy clouds streamed into the area.

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    Just in time for the rain, we hit many miles of road construction with generally hard packed surfaces, but at times we did have to deal with mud.

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    It certainly wasn't a big deal, but I would find out the following day that I was not paying enough attention to the bikes mechanically after riding, pavement, gravel, dirt and mud during the course of this ride.
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  9. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi Love my Tranny Super Supporter

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    Oh, that sounds ominous!
  10. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    As we were riding along, Kim mentioned two things. First, she wasn't feeling well and second, her bike seemed to be skipping. Shortly thereafter, I could hear her sneezing, sniffling and coughing as we rode along. I asked her if she was OK, and like a trooper she said she was. But as her sneezing and coughing increased, we had to stop so she could clear her head of all the phlegm. I could tell she was miserable. She also started complaining that the skipping in her bike was getting worse. I told her to keep me up to date on the situation and if the condition became worse, we'd stop for the day and I'd give the bike a good going over.

    I was really hoping that Kim would start feeling better and her bike issue not worsen until we crossed the border into the US. After about 4 hours of riding, we did make it to the border.

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    We pulled up to the shack and did all the normal things we do when we enter back into the US. Wait for the green light, pull up to the booth, turn off engine, take off sunglasses and helmet and have passport ready. It didn't take 15 seconds for the CBP guard to greet us. He asked us where we were coming from and I told him that we had left from our driveway in Vermont. He asked us if we were husband and wife and we said yes. He then smiled and walked back into the shack. Less than a minute later, he came out and handed us our passports saying, "When you get a chance, check out page 24". At the time we had no clue what he meant, but we thanked him and rode off after a very easy crossing. Later, when we stopped for lunch, I opened the passport and found this.

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    Normally, you don't get a stamp when returning to the US. But this CBP guard was nice enough to give us a momento that we could have from the trip. It was a really nice thought!

    From there, it wasn't that long a ride to Tok, Alaska. We rode along with Kim coughing and sneezing and telling me more often that the bike was skipping. I asked her if she thought she and the bike could make it to Tok before I took a look at the bike. She said she could but didn't know about the bike. When all was said and done, we made it to Tok. We pulled into a RV repair shop with a dirt driveway so I could more fully check out Kim's bike. At first glance, nothing seemed wrong with the engine, so I jumped on her bike and rode it around their parking lot. Yes, there was a definite skipping feeling and sound that once it happened, I knew what it was.

    I got off the bike, got on my knees and checked out the chain and sprocket. Crap!

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    How could I have been so lax? The chain was very dry and caked with road grime. It was so bad, that the links had taken up a non linear position. It was also clear that the chain had significantly stretched and I hadn't done anything about it. So too late, I broke out the chain lube and brush and worked the chain over. Then I went into my tool bag to get a socket to tighten the chain. No joy. Somehow, I had not taken the correct socket for Kim's rear wheel. Moron!

    Since I was at a RV garage, I wandered in and asked if I might borrow a wrench or have someone come out and loosen the axle nut.

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    The guy said no problem, walked over to a tool box, handed me a number of sockets and said, "Try these." Out of the handful, one did fit and I was able to loosen the axle nut and tighten the chain. But as I was in there, I found that the rear sprocket had also taken a beating and it was contributing to the chain problem. I didn't think it was bad enough that we couldn't go on, but we would definitely need to change the rear sprocket soon. It was also becoming clear that her rear tire would need a change soon. Compared to mine, it looked tired and worn out.

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    (My rear tire)

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    (Kim's rear tire)

    Our next stop was to be in Eagle River, Alaska and I thought that we could make it there easily. My concern was now for how Kim was feeling. I asked her if she could make it to Glenallen and then to Eagle River. Again like a good trooper she said she would try, but that she really was ready for a break and wanted to go home. I said OK and we got back on the road.

    More gravel roads greeted us and the scenery was excellent. But Kim was feeling worse all the time, so we expedited our travels.

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    Soon we were closing in on Glenallen and were back on the pavement. Along the way, we saw this homemade airport. Nice to taxi from your garage right onto your airstrip!

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    By the end of the riding day, weather was once again on its way.

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    But we did make it to Glenallen before nightfall and called it an evening at a house we had found on AirBNB.
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  11. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    After a good nights sleep, Kim awoke still feeling crappy. We had planned on staying with some friends in Eagle River, Alaska and we were less than a couple days away. With flu like symptoms, Kim was still OK with riding. I told her that we were less than a two day ride to Eagle River, and she just blew her nose, put on her gear and got on the bike. How could I be so lucky?

    The towns were now coming more often and it was looking more like we were headed to "civilization". While there were still open roads, we were pretty much on pavement all day.

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    As we rode further, we started seeing more signs of "civilization" as the roads were beginning to be lined with telephone poles and signs of daily living.

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    Still, there were great mountain and glacier views to be seen.

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    So we decided to stop and take a break in front of the glacier.

    If you look beyond my big Katoom, you can see a glacier snaking its way towards us.

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    Kim was still able to manage a smile between coughs and sneezes.

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    There was a gorgeous panorama in front of us.

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    Flowers grew at the side of the road creating a nice foreground to an awesome background.

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    I'm not sure what these were, but they were a beautiful purple color with a brush like texture.

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    Although the road coming out of Glennallen was all paved, it was nice and twisty with lots of elevation change and steep dropoffs.

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    Back on the bikes, we it was becoming more and more civilized, with powerlines, light poles and snow markers lining the side of the road.

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    Before we knew it we had made it to Eagle River, AK, with traffic and all the things we had not missed during most of our trip so far.

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    We pulled into our friends home and had a wonderful evening chatting and talking about what was going on in each other's lives. To top it off, Kim was feeling better, but we had previously decided that it would be best to fly home and take a break for a while. We had been on the road 7 weeks and had covered more than 7,500 miles and enjoyed every minute of it. But it was time to get Kim home for some rest before we got back on the bikes. The following morning we would drop our bikes off with a shipper and fly home.

    When we got up the following morning it was raining. We were already disappointed that we were leaving Alaska so quickly and the forecast called for an additional 6 days of rain. It really was time for us to head home. We jumped on the bikes and as we headed towards Anchorage, we received a visit from a four legged friend just down the road from our friends house.

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    She stood in the road for a while and then decided to vault the stone wall to our right. She wasn't able to make it so she ran towards us, cleared the stone wall and vanished into the woods. It was a nice sendoff.

    Before we knew it we were flying home, sad but satisfied we had had such a wonderful first stage of our journey.

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    But our plan was to get Kim 100% well and rested and start a new stage of this journey in the not too distant future. We were able to accomplish both goals.

    More later.
  12. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi Love my Tranny Super Supporter

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    I'm very much enjoying this ride report. Cheers from downunder...
  13. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Thanks so much MrKiwi. Someday we hope to ride in your part of the world!
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  14. juno

    juno Long timer

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    Thanks for sharing!
    And the next part is????
  15. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Hi Juno,

    After Kim's bout with the flu and a few weeks home, we departed our home in Vermont northerly... More very soon!
  16. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    We did arrive home to Vermont safely and life returned to "normal". Back to the dailies of life and we were enjoying just living where we do in Vermont. Clear fall nights can result in scenes like this...

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    No, no... It's not the stuff in the foreground of the pic that makes the night sky look like that. It really is that way naturally. Hanging out, the days fly by quickly, but the summer was waning and we wanted to get another ride in before the snow flew. So what did we decide to do? Head south? Nah, we decided to head north! We really didn't have much of a set destination planned. We'd already ridden the Trans Labrador highway twice, (First Trans Lab Ride - 2007)
    (Second Trans Lab Ride - 2015) so if we were going to head north, we decided to ride to at least one area we had not really explored before.

    So we decided to ride from Vermont into New Hampshire, Maine, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and back through Maine, NH and home to Vermont. This plan was a significant change from our original plan to head south from Alaska to Ushuaia, but for a short ramble, it seemed to fit the bill. There were also a couple of other changes in process. First, we'd be riding different bikes this time. We would not be riding the bikes we rode to Alaska.

    Kim's faithful Suzuki DR650 was to be swapped for a Ducati Scrambler which I would try to adapt for more gravel capability. It's not designed to be a true off road machine, but for the pavement, gravel and dirt roads we'd be on for this ride, I thought it would be fine. We threw on the soft Ducati saddlebags and tank bag that came with the bike and fitted some SW-Motech crash bars, radiator guard and a larger sidestand foot. We mounted her old Jesse top box to an SW-Motech rear rack and bolted on some large Barkbusters and factory heated grips. Lastly, I mounted a pair of ADVMonster Model 60 LED lights. So by the time we were done, Kim's Scrambler looked like this.

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    (BTW, since we returned, I fitted a larger Power Bronze windshield this is just about the perfect size.)

    My KTM990 was to be exchanged for a new Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin.

    It would be similarly equipped as my 990A. We added some Touratech crash and case guard bars, Touratech bashplate, a pair of ADVMonster Model 60 LED lights, a new pannier rack system from Happy Trails and attached my previous Happy Trails panniers and top box. We threw on some Barkbusters, headlight guard and some Oxford Adventure heated grips and we were ready to ride. In the end it came out looking like this.

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    We pay our own money for all our gear, but I have to say that I am ridiculously impressed by the ADVMonster Model 60 LED lights created by an ADV inmate here. They draw very little power and the light is pure white. We don't generally ride in the dark, but I must say that after you see what they can do for you, other than animal collisions etc., it is a pleasure riding in the dark. It can get pretty dark up here in Vermont, but even when it's blackest black, riding with them looks like this...

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    During the daytime, we ride with them on as well, just for that extra visibility.

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    If someone says they didn't see you coming, they weren't looking. Anyway, we were now ready to roll. We loaded up the bikes, got our gear ready and rolled off onto the 2.7 gravel road from our house.

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    More soon!
    Mudclod and OR_Rider like this.
  17. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi Love my Tranny Super Supporter

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    The AT for you and a Duc scrambler for Kim, nice. Looking forward to seeing how this turns out. I've recently purchased the AT, with the DCT gearbox. Loving it.
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  18. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    We meandered through Vermont and New Hampshire taking our time, not worried about where we would stop. It was pretty laid back riding and it wasn't until it started to get dark (in moose country we might add) that we decided to stop for the night in Rangeley, Maine. As we rode along in the dark, I was pretty happy that we had fitted the ADVMonster lights. Ultimately, we ended up at the Rangeley Inn, which is a fairly high class place for people on a low class budget. But it was after labor day, and the room rates were not too bad. By the time we made it to the tavern for dinner, it was 8:00 PM and we had been riding all day. I know I took some pics during the day and the evening, but somehow my camera did not know that I had. Therefore, all I have in the line of pics for the day is this rather threatening picture of me across the table from Kim's buffalo mozzarella and tomato stack. Well at least I had some beer..

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    When we awoke the following day, it was abnormally hot for the season, probably in the mid 90s F. We had no real route but were generally following a compass heading and going where the roads took us. Ultimately, we ended up on a nice gravel road around a lake.

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    We wandered in around 10 miles and the road turned to what in Vermont is termed an un-maintained Class IV road. Since Kim's machine wasn't really set up for it, I told her to wait while I checked it out. I bumped my way in another couple of miles and the road just ended although my GPS said that it continued around the lake and came out on a named road. Sometimes I really hate GPSs. I turned around and we headed for the maintained road.

    Once again, we just meandered through Maine stopping here and there for a quick picture or for one of the many Coca Cola stops that we would make during this part of our Planet Ramble. You see, when it is hot and muggy, Kim likes to keep hydrated. It seemed like we were stopping like... every 5 minutes. Apparently, fluids evaporate from Kim's body at an alarming rate because she can drink the stuff all day long and not have to pee. Me on the other hand, can only drink a single bottle of the stuff and I have to stop to pee every 5 minutes. So it seems that in this situation we are made for each other!

    So anyway, we were in some very tiny town and Kim spotted a convenience store as we rode by. I was hoping that she had missed it, but with her eagle eye, she had seen it and 5 minutes after we had seen the store, Kim hinted that she was really thirsty and would like a drink. OK, one U-turn later and...

    While I was waiting for Kim to return, I walked around a bit and found that this little convenience store was right an ATV trail which are plentiful in the area. You can see the entrance just across the road. I thought about jumping on the trail with the bike, but I didn't know whether it was authorized and what the terrain would be like once on the trail. If it wasn't so hot...

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    Anyway, before long, Kim appeared from the store.

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    She really likes Coke products and she had found big bottles of it at this little store. She was elated. I yelled my congratulations to her for finding it and...

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    All hail, the returning hero! We then sat down on the grass in the shade of a large tree and gulped down the Cokes. When we were done, Kim took stock of what she had left in her stash.

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    (what's that sticker on the lid mean?)

    Anyway, after we had finished our drinks we got back on the bikes; Kim fully hydrated and me needing to pee. Doh! As we roamed around, we sort of got lost but since we didn't have to be anywhere in particular, we took it in stride. I'm not sure of what my GPS was up to, but it had some surprising ideas for routing...

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    Really? Turn right there?

    Ultimately we decided to look at a paper map and headed in the general direction of central Maine.
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  19. Mudclod

    Mudclod Mojo Moto

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    So many great shots! Those new bikes are outstanding. I'm so envious!!!
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  20. Ride2ADV

    Ride2ADV World Shrinkers Super Supporter

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    Along the way, we ended up at the Mount Bigelow Preserve near Flagstaff Lake traveling on a long twisty road leading to a dam. Just before the dam, an area had been set up for camping and picnics, so we pulled the bikes into the shade under a large tree.

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    We sat down at the picnic table in the site and ate a late lunch of powerbars, nuts and you guessed it, Coke. We then decided it was time to check out the river and lake just across from us and it was not disappointing.

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    We stood on the rocky shore and walked over to check things out a little closer. It turned out to be really nice!

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    We also had to take a selfie while we were there.

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    Before we left, I had to ensure that my walking on water skills were still intact.

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    Still got em'. :lol3

    Cooled off a bit, we got on the bikes and headed northeast over the freshly paved dam road.

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    By dinner time, it was once again overcast and threatening rain. We decided that we needed to choose a place right away if we wanted to beat the rain and darkness. We were near Sebec Lake when we finally started to search for a place to stay. We figured that we were in central Maine after Labor Day and that finding a room would be a cinch. We were wrong. We stopped at 5 different places including chain motels, B&B's AirBnB and stand alone motels and each time were turned away. There were no rooms to be had.

    It was now raining and getting dark, so we asked a few locals where we might find a place to stay. Ultimately, we were told that we should check out the mill in Dover Foxcroft, Maine. Mill huh? Well we needed a place, so we headed right over. We found the building called The Mill, but instead of finding a hotel/motel, we found a little restaurant.

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    Where's the hotel? We walked up to the cashier in our dripping wet 'Stiches and she said that we were in the right place, and that the hotel was upstairs. We asked if they had any rooms available, and we were lucky enough to get the last one. :clap After we had filled out the paperwork, she served a couple of people at the counter and then led us up a long flight of stairs. Inside was a long narrow corridor with room doors spaced widely apart. She opened the door and we couldn't believe our eyes. The room was HUGE and nicely appointed!

    She showed us around a bit and gave us the key (a real metal key I might add). For what we paid, the room was amazing. The ceilings were probably 18 feet high. As we walked in, there was a mud room of sorts with a roughly hewn table filled with water, coffee, tea, cookies, Kind bars, and other snacks, all of which were on the house. Kim not only liked the snacks, but she fell in love with the table and asked me to make one for her when we got home.

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    (I took this picture after we had raided all of the snacks/goodies out of the white striped bag)

    Behind the wall with the table was the bedroom, complete with king size bed, a large TV and 5 foot high windows looking out to the street and river below.

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    Behind the wall was an amazing bathroom with those same 18 foot high ceilings.

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    All in all, a really nice place to call home for the night! If you want to see better pictures of the rooms and the facility overall, click HERE.

    Oh and I did make her a table like the one in the room. It came out like this...

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    (kind of a cheap imitation, but it works!)

    We had a great night's sleep, but when we woke it, it was still raining. Big time...

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    So instead of heading right out on the road, we slept in a bit and went downstairs to get some breakfast at the cafe.

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    We waited a couple of hours and the rain did not slacken. So we put the 'Stiches on and hit the road. We rode in pouring rain for a couple of hours.

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    But as the day progressed, the weather started to improve.

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    And by the time another hour had passed, we were in mostly blue skies with drying pavement.

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    The more we rode, the nicer it got.

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    It got so nice that we decided to take a break for a late lunch. Ultimately we arrived in the small town of Island Falls, Maine. We pulled up in front of the local post office and literally sat on the curb munching on powerbars, nuts and coke.

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    I walked around a bit, and it was clear that Island Falls was an old town perhaps which had seen better days.

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    Shortly after I took this pic, a man walked up to us and said that if we needed to use the bathroom or needed any help, come on down to a building a couple structures down the road and he would open it up for us and let us use the facilities. So after we had finished our lunch, we walked down the street to the building the man pointed out and knocked on the door. He came to the door immediately, and let us in to use the facilities. He then introduced himself as Pete Connelly. Pete said that he and his wife had retired and that his wife was from Island Falls. Together, they decided that the town needed help to come back to its original splendor, so Pete had been buying local buildings that were shuttered and had been fixing them up and re-opening them to serve the people of the town. He was presently working on the building that he let us use the facilities in. Amazing! Pete asked us if we wanted to see any of his other work and we said "Sure!".

    Pete took us to a building across the street and showed us how he had fixed up the building and opened a market and a restaurant for the town's people. We couldn't miss the fact that outside the building was an authentic red English phone booth which he had imported from Suffolk, England.

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    We went in back of the restaurant where he showed us the view of the River and the old Mill that use to be the lifeblood of the town.

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    You can see the train trestle and the foundation in the right of the picture.

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    It was a nice view but a couple of years earlier, there was no view whatsoever. Trees and brush had totally obscured the mill and trestle. Pete felt that the people of the town should be able to see its proud history. So he went to the town to get permission to open the view. He was promptly turned down with the town citing that the trees and brush that had grown had to stay in to preserve the town's character. Frustrated, he did some research and found that as a young man, President Theodore Roosevelt spent a great deal of time in Island Pond, Maine. It was here that he got physically fit and learned hunting, fishing and tracking. Apparently, Island Pond, Maine helped Roosevelt gain an appreciation for the wilderness and was the genesis of his plan to create national parks.

    Pete also found that Roosevelt often lived in the Sewell House, a house not far from where we were standing (actually it was right beside the post office you saw in an earlier picture.) Here's a picture of it now...

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    Pete found one other thing and that was a stash of pictures showing the mill and trestle and the open view that was present during the time Roosevelt launched small boats from beside the train trestle. With this data and these pictures, he was able to get the town to allow him to clear the view to the town's history.

    We chatted with Pete for about an hour but it was time to get on the road again, we intended to be in Canada before night fell.

    More soon!
    Pete S, kingorange and juno like this.