KLR future, does it have one?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by amk, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. Django Loco

    Django Loco Banned

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    Not to turn this into a KLR vs. DR contest but I have to say BOTH are really good bikes. I've owned both. On a recent ride to Colorado I rode with a group of 6 or 7 KLR's up over some passes. They all did great, I did OK (note tires in pic:eek1 ) but the KLR guys all had Knobbies. On the steep downhills the DR was a bit slippy!

    I would say the KLR needs more to work as good off road bike. The DR is a better natural off road bike. It's also a lot lighter than the new KLR. It's also smaller and LOWER than the KLR, which suits me at only 5'6". The KLR has a shield, but for me ..... well I don't WANT a shield, especially in the heat.

    I rode out to Colorado, 3200 miles round trip in mostly 95f to the 118f of Death Valley. DR never burped even once.

    In Baja, after a couple weeks exploring I had to get home .... rode from Guerrero Negro to San Francisco ..... straight through, stopping only for gas, pee and meals. No shield. Me like. The DR can sit on 80mph indicated, smooth and nice. My old KLR, even at 70mph, felt a bit over revved and made unflattering noises.
    Colorado
    [​IMG]
    Moab
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    Moab
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    Baja near Scorpion Bay
    [​IMG]
    #61
  2. Foot dragger

    Foot dragger singletracker

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    And is way simpler with out water cooling,fan related issues,no dash board or extraneous gauges,Doo fixing. It also has bigger ft forks,better rear suspension build quality,no fairing hanging off the ft of the frame, vibrates way less,handles and looks more like a dirt bike and weighs a fair amount less especially compared to the newer and bigger 08. The fairing on the 08 must take about 1 crash to start looking ugly. Other then those small issues the KLR is a great bike for many people.:lol3
    #62
  3. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy Supporter

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    What my beat-up-ex-flattracker buddy here forgets is that the KLR, while being not quite the lightweight, ass-kicking dual-sport that is the DR, it's physically larger. That makes quite a difference to those of us who make the DR look like an XR100.:lol3 Mr. Foot Dragger is built more along the lines of the "average American male" than some (like me). And yeah, buddy, he can make that little DR fly, too......................:1drink


    My KLR had an initial buy-in that was much lower than a used DR. I've spent a ton of money o the thing in the 18 months that I've had it, but I don't really mind. I enjoy working on it (most of the time, anyway) and had the price been much higher I likely wouldn't even own a 650 single of any kind. The financial realities of family life make the KLR a better choice for some, myself included.
    #63
  4. SRA

    SRA Why is the rum gone?

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    Hey Patrick! (Django Loco)

    I resemble that KLR rider that has left his key on. Handsome devil.

    Since then I have taken the KLR over Imogene again, Engineer from Ouray, Mosquito and Georgia. The only failure I have had is a leaky fork seal. 23,000 miles.

    Luck willing, sanity questioned we will do Red Cone in two weeks. They say it makes Imogene look like a fireroad. :yikes

    [​IMG]
    #64
  5. yater

    yater Long timer

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    +1 for the DR. It's a better bike all around even with the tank, rack, and corbin included.
    #65
  6. RAZR

    RAZR u may run the risks my friend but I do the cutting

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    i hear guys really like thems BMWs.
    they would LOVE to work on YOUR bike for ya!:clap
    #66
  7. rob feature

    rob feature pull my finger

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    After lots of tinkering with and riding my '02, I can honestly say the only thing I liked about that bike was the motor. Well, I'll take that back...the motor and the lack of expense. I bought my '02 as a 'beater', spent lots of time and some money farkling and fixing, and rode. No matter what I did to it, I couldn't get past that 'cheap' feel. Everything felt klunky. Even after servicing and inspecting everything, it just felt like a cheap toy.

    On my first ride after finishing the bike, one of my footpeg bolts fell off. I loctite everything, and those bolts were no exception. One still vibrated out and another was halfway gone. Beyond that, the footpeg mounts aren't exactly confidence-inspiring. And I did all the upgrades...I expected much more.

    However, the '02 motor was very solid, and gave what was asked of it. Every time. Even though the stock clutch is a bit weak.

    These '08 motors seem to be burning lots of oil for some reason. I've read quite a few reports of the motors burning up from losing/burning oil too fast. And as I understand it, the motors aren't all that different.

    On the other hand, I've heard of plenty of folks globetrotting on them and getting back home safely. Will I ever own another one? No way. But I did like the pre '08 motor just fine (after the doohiky/ oil screen are fixed). But all bikes are a compromise in one way or another. IMHO, there are better alternatives for the cash. But the KLR sits in a unique spot...inexpensive, can carry lots of stuff, can be made comfortable easily, and can cover great distances if you keep an eye on things and proactively do some upgrades. But IMO, you need to upgrade far too many things on the bike to get it to even DRZ 400 standards. I wanted so badly to like the KLR, but it kept pushing me away.
    #67
  8. amk

    amk Been here awhile

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    Here we are again. What does an adventure bike should have? Can other bikes, not defined as adventure bikes, substitute for them?

    My theory, which accidentally supported by every motorcycle company which makes adventure bikes i.e.: BMW GS, Varadero, Transalp, KTM 990 Adventure, Tenere, says these bikes have to have decent road range (big tank), provide solid road comfort (seat), provide protection from elements (fairing, screen, handguards), has a place to place luggage on (a rack at least), and of course ride roads without pavement. KLR falls under such definition in every aspect.

    If you can ride your DR in stock form for 900 km in one day, with temperatures around + 10 C and several showers since adventure means unexpected sometimes, I do not care. I do need and use everything from the list above. By the way, off road capacity of any bike will be significantly tamed by the mass of the carried luggage. If you do not have luggage because you ride one day trips or ride between motels, can you call those rides as adventure?<o:p></o:p>
    #68
  9. rivercreep

    rivercreep Banned

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    Too late!
    It already has liquid cooling and too much plastic to smash off road.
    For the 650 class = one good choice for the $.......DR650

    ........for me at least, radiators have no place off road in the middle of nowhere unless you're not far from the truck that carried it there to take it home again.
    #69
  10. holycaveman

    holycaveman Long timer

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    Although I do agree with air cooling, and still like it. Radiators do work, and the ones on my KLR are protected, I mean very protected! Put it this way, if you crashed hard enough to damage them, you wouldn't be worried about the radiators.

    Stock though they are susceptible to damage.

    And this is why I have two radiators on the KLR. I only need one to run the bike:wink:

    Also if you can't handle being out in the middle no-where, then maybe you shouldn't go. Besides, what if your piston seizes because you overheated your dr?
    #70
  11. montesa_vr

    montesa_vr Legend in his own mind

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    I did that on an XT500. People have done it on TW200s. You seem to think a fairing is a requirement. Just as many find them a huge hindrance due to weight, wind buffeting around the head, and extra noise. And come on, it's not like all the KLR owners out there are running stock seats.

    I would definitely like to see larger tanks on dual sports, but the 6.1 gallon capacity of the KLR is excessive for most uses. Even on the Cassiar highway 4 gallons would be plenty.
    #71
  12. Wr3ckZ

    Wr3ckZ Safety Gear Tester!

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    Does the KLR have a future?

    Simply, Yes.

    Not everyone wants the same thing.

    There are those of us who LIKE that basic feeling, ease of maintenance, and the ergos fit. (As well as the fun of 'tinkering' with usually minor problems.)

    And, as long as we are out there, Kawi will continue to sell the lowly, hated, constantly bashed upon KLR.

    The road less travelled doesnt call out to everyone, but to those it does, they all answer it differently.

    Enjoy your rides, whatever they may be.

    :thumb
    #72
  13. homefront

    homefront Adventurer

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    My first post... YIPPEEE! :rofl

    I bought the KLR to commute to work. That involves highways, side roads, dirt roads, and getting into constructions sites.

    For the highway, the KLR's physical size, power, brakes and fairing are all a plus. I'll be adding a T-Bob, 16 tooth front sprocket, and Laminar Lip soon, and making my own larger rear-rack. All part of the fun! :freaky

    My off-roading is limited to the job sites, and and occasional forays across medians. There have been 2 occasions where an accident blocked a major highway, and, unlike everyone else, I was able to ride the KLR over hill/dale/private property to go around a mess. Not fair to the other drivers (and probably illegal) but I'll go if I can go. There may be more off-roading in the future, with friends who have cool ideas about off-raod camping.

    BUT...

    There is another reason I bought the KLR.

    Some of you may remember a little event called 9/11.

    I worked in NYC for 12 years, and was stunned by the attack. I firmly believe that more attacks are likely, and there's no telling what kind they might be.

    All I know is that in the event of an attack on any city I'm working near (like Philadelphia), the roadways will be jammed, or could be blocked by terrorist damage, or our military.

    My first priority is to get home to my family.

    So while the KLR is very good for on-road use (90% of my needs), it will also take me off the beaten path when THE NEED presents itself. Whenever I'm assigned to a job site, I spend a little time planning a "bug out" route to home. Armed with a route and a KLR, I know I'll get to my family.
    #73
  14. buggiebuggie

    buggiebuggie Been here awhile

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    Django Loco:

    Palin v Gore? Not anyone's poster waver. Last time I saw a run ticket, I didn't see Gore's name at all. The fact that I think Gore is an utter buffoon doesn't mean I'm in anyone elses camp. Just becuase i think he's an idiot doesn't mean I'm Republican, or Libitarian or not Democrat. I guess I should be glad that Gore invented the internet so that we can communicate... you're right... God bless Gore!

    There are no LAWS in place to mandate FI on all motorcycles, unless it's in the Peple's Republic of California?... The majors are switching to more easily conform to emissions standards and I say great... I'm actually trying to convert my KLR to FI and hope they come out with FI before I'm done and spend the money it's going to take. Reliability, economy and yes emissions will be better.

    I actually love the new emmissions "laws." I have a flex fuel 3/4 ton that gets 10 miles per gallon (when it's empty and not pulling my horses). I get a great tax break for driving this vehicle that my friends with economy cars that get 30-35 miles per gallon don't get. That's our government at it's ultimate best!
    #74
  15. teeedubya

    teeedubya Been here awhile

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    I think a better question would be, is:

    How will the KLR be remembered? :freaky
    #75
  16. buggiebuggie

    buggiebuggie Been here awhile

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    +1

    I'll refine that question to:

    What will be the KLR's legacy?
    #76
  17. mtndragon

    mtndragon Traveler

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    The KLR's legacy will be that of a simple bike that fits big people and gear well, and will take you anywhere you want to go.







    And bring you back.
    #77
  18. CHICKENHAWK

    CHICKENHAWK window licker

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    That's frickin' phenomenal, do anything special?
    #78
  19. guns_equal_freedom

    guns_equal_freedom Long timer

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    Ask that question in this thread in 50 years, people will still be bitching about all the KLR's still on the road.....:lol3
    #79
  20. teeedubya

    teeedubya Been here awhile

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    :rofl
    #80