KLR future, does it have one?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by amk, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. Django Loco

    Django Loco Banned

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    While dual sports historically have not sold all that well, Yamaha are, in fact, going around with there heads in the sand. I've been to their product intros and seen this at the highest levels. In '05 I told the Yam excec's that they needed an Adventure bike and a Dual sport bike. Several Yam staffers (from headquarters in SoCal) claimed:

    "The numbers just aren't there". And at the time, they may have been right. But these guys don't see trends.

    Look at industry reports NOW .... and really for the last two years.
    Dual sports sales are up about 25%. In certain regions around the country Suzuki sold out of DR650's and the new KLR has just fueled this rush.

    Yam now has the new WR250, but they really need to step up and bring in the new Euro only Tenere'. (and figure out how to take 40 lbs. off it.)

    So for now, dual sports, according to industry sources are out selling many other catagories. In fact, are the only segment that is UP.
    Most all others are down.

    Are Yamaha worried? They should be:eek1
  2. Bob Billen

    Bob Billen n00b

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    I have been searching for a light weight dual sport that will travel at a decent highway speed for 50 to 100 miles and still be good off road. Is there a 400 out there that will do this? I have a 06 KLR 650 now,but it a little heavy for me off road. It will cruise at 70 mph for long periods will any 400 450 do that ? Bob Billen Denver Colorado
  3. Bladeforger

    Bladeforger Been here awhile

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    There's the Suzi DRZ. That's a 400. If you like Kawasakis, go look at a KLX250 (SE?--keep getting all the letters konfuzed). Don't mind older? Check out the DR350SE, S, or DR350 dual-sported for tags. Don't mind slower? XT250 (or XT225 if a few years older). Touted for reliability and longevity. I have a KLR, and they can be a handful and a half off road--I can empathize. The Yamaha WR250, according to owners, cruises at 70 MPH just fine. Is it worth 2 grand more than an XT250? Nah. I'm probably going to add an XT250, so I've been looking. Not much is going to be better off road AND cruise at 70 for long periods... unless you are okay forking out some bigger bucks. I'd keep the KLR and get another DS--something smaller--and then ride the one that fit my mood for the day / trip.
  4. zane121

    zane121 Been here awhile

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    Inexpensive, thumper I can work on; does 70mph with no issues and goes where I need it to off road. I think the future is strong. Not everyone wants nor could I afford a 12-14K twin cylinder. The thumper works well and fits me better than the rest.
    Ride them all if you are looking to buy.
  5. SRA

    SRA Why is the rum gone?

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    The KLR650 is rock solid for me. Not only that, I keep tabs on the KLR650 sites and most bikes are like mine. I can only speculate that, like a small number of KLRs, any other bikes suffers the same fate.

    The KLR is a proven design that is probably more reliable than other bikes. (or at least as reliable) Throw in the availabilty of parts and you can see why a number of my friends and hundreds of other people chose the KLR650 to go around the world.
  6. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    On the cheap, modded DR350 or 650. Both are lighter than the KLR650 and generally easier for shorter riders to handle.

    You can get a lighter bike with better performance than these, but it'll cost you.
  7. Yossarian™

    Yossarian™ Deputy Cultural Attaché

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    How light weight must it be? If it can be in the 300 lb. range, I'd strongly suggest a TE610. I have both a KLR and a TE and the difference is night and day when it comes to suspension, handling, and weight. The TE's 6th gear makes it a peach on the highway.
  8. swamp_donkey

    swamp_donkey no political affliat

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    The only reason i read all these post is I typed T-bob in the search box and this thread showed up.
    I didnt see it!
  9. Jeremy1981

    Jeremy1981 shopping for a ride

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    See post 79.
    Now that I did your homework for you, are you going to expect to copy off my test, too? :rofl

    Jeremy
  10. swamp_donkey

    swamp_donkey no political affliat

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    Wasnt quite what I was expecting ( #79) but thanks man.

    Yeah , go ahead and give me what ya got.

    Test?
  11. klraroundtheworld

    klraroundtheworld Ride the World!

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    I bought my klr 650 new right out of the box. I think I speak for 90% of all klr owners when I say this; go with the drz or the xr650 stay away from the klr. Granted the klr 650 over the past two plus years of owning it has made me into a better mechanic I don’t think it’s the right bike for someone who dosent like working on bikes. As far as kawi fixing the bike and making it better; LMAO; that’s really funny Kawi will never do it because it would cost them to much money for their hunk of junk bike. If I could do it all over again I would have gotten a proven xr650r or the drz 650 they are simply better more reliable bikes. For the plus side on the klr its cheep; cheep and well cheep so you cant go wrong there until you go to tighten a loose bolt and have it strip away in your havnd. If I had a dollor for every time that happened kawi would have to give there bikes away for free. Maybe I am being a little harsh I still like mine it’s a 07 with my mileage around 25k the doohickey failed around 14k it burns oil a quart for every 800 miles while it should be a 1000; So I have to get my engine torn down inspected and rebuilt the parts for a average klr 650 rebuild 300 dollars the labor for a mechanic to do it 1500-2000 dollars to anonymously slander kawis gear on the internet priceless. Stick with the Honda or Suzuki If you are going to get a klr BUY USED and make sure the previously owner took good care of it and it might be an alright bike. I hope this info helped considering my klr is my only mode of transportation and I ride it every day.
  12. Django Loco

    Django Loco Banned

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    It's pretty obvious to me something has gone wrong with Kawasaki in Thailand. The KLR has been built there over ten years, but it seems just the new model is getting a rash of problems.

    I do not know if the engines are made in Thailand, I think that now they probably are. Perhaps KHI (Kawasaki Heavy Industries) have cut funding to the Thai operation? Perhaps Japanese oversight has slacked off or been discontinued?

    For whatever reason, Kawasaki have a serious problem. Word has spread via the net and this is sure to hurt sales of the bike. I hope some Net Savvy person at KHI is paying attention to the numerous reports of engine failures on the new bikes.

    The original KLR was bad enough with the Doo Hickey and very questionable build quality. The engine was bascially always OK, but the rest of the bike had issues.

    We are all familiar with those issues: bad brakes, subframe/bolts,
    spindly forks, Doo hickey.

    But the problems on the new KLR are a sad testament to a downhill slide at Kawi and other Japanese companies. As more and more production is shifted to Asia (mainly China and Korea) I predict we will see major teething problems. The Japanese have the resources and skill to fix all this .... question is ... do they have the will?

    In this present serious world depression the MC business is very hard hit. The good news is KHI will survive and even thrive. But will they put money into a failing business? Motorcycle sales are about 50% down for '08 .... and '09 could be worse. Will they jump in?

    Don't hold your breath.

    Buying a used new model KLR is the wise thing to do, as suggested
    by previous poster. Get one with a guaranteed service history.
    Remember, only a small percentage of KLR's are faulty. Get a good one and all should be well. The improvements to the new KLR are a good step. Could they have done more? Of course.

    In a few years they will be forced to upgrade to F.I. My prediction is, at this time they will "fix" some of the things they "missed" in the '07 upgrade. Anyway, just a thought to hope for.
  13. Camas

    Camas Rooster Bastid

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    I think you're wrong on so many levels. Maybe if you knew how to maintain a KLR or how to upgrade the stuff that needs it (mountains of online support) you'd have something of value to say.

    You're just nucking futz. :norton
  14. Django Loco

    Django Loco Banned

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    How do you explain new KLR's burning a quart in 400 miles? I personally have two friends where this was the case. In one case the engine was rebuilt with no further issues. The other did not go well and owner is in litigation. He wants ALL his money back .... and them some.

    Suffice to say, this has nothing to do with an owner knowing how to maintain a bike ... or not. These are brand new bikes. Most seem to have problems within the first few thousand miles.

    I owned a '98 KLR so can only comment on that bike. It was fine but I hated working on it. I rode it 5500 into Baja, mainland Mexico, Copper Canyon and way beyond. No problems, I just didn't like it all that much. It was a long term test bike.

    So much potential with the KLR ... Kawi just missed some key things.
    Too bad ... and now this. (new KLR :deal ):eek1
  15. Dakar dreamer

    Dakar dreamer Dave rocker

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    I agree, its the other way around. 90% or better of new buyers are thrilled with their bikes. These are bullet proof bikes and any maintenance is pretty straight forward.

    Most owners will never have a problem. This is the best selling dual sport in the United states and Kawasaki sells some 30,000 of them here yearly.

    If I were looking for a new bike for off roading on anything much more than smooth non-technical trails, I would go with the XRL or DR. The KLR is the hot ticket for the cross country rides/tours/pavement.
  16. Hondo

    Hondo **********

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    Who are you that you think you can "speak for 90% of all klr owners"?

    I run a dedicated KLR website and a forum, beat my bike mecicilessly, ride it everywhere, wrench on my bike as well as other bikes at tech days that I hold, and you won't catch me saying anything that arrogant.

    That is your point of view, and nothing more.
  17. amk

    amk Been here awhile

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    That is it, no other bike/brand needs so called tech days. <o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    It is said that every bike requires maintenance in amounts greater than cars do. I still cannot justify this statement, but I accept its realm. The question is what is maintenance? If it is changing motor oil, oil/air filter, and dealing with occasional malfunctions –fine. But if the bike requires continuous “easy and well documented” work to be done and tech days, I’d say this is a piece of shit, not a bike. <o:p></o:p>
    Recently I helped a friend with 08KLR, boy, it was I nightmare. No, a say not a single bolt or nut was set properly at the factory, some were stripped right there and set by a hammer, other were so soft metal, they actually have already been rusted away, the bike left the production line only 8 months ago! <o:p></o:p>

    And yes, that is my point of view. Who says otherwise?
  18. Hondo

    Hondo **********

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    You have obviously never been to a tech day before.

    Sure, doohickeys get changed, but the majority of things that get done are maintenance items like valves, swingarm lube, fluid changes, upgrades, and electrical installations like heated grips and hard wiring of other items.

    A myiad of other farkles are also added.

    On top of that, there are meals served and freinds are made.

    It's not a day dedicated to correcting shortcomings of a KLR (or KLX/DRZ or whatever else shows up), but a maintenance day where people get help with items they want others around for.

    It's a community thing.

    You are obviously a highly experienced 94 post count n00b that's going to tell everyone here the way it is, and I'm done with you pal.
  19. Django Loco

    Django Loco Banned

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    Hondo,
    I don't think AMK quite gets it. I've had Tech days on the last five bikes I've owned. Went to several on my Vstrom (a bike with hardly any faults or problems.) A great way to learn about your bike and makes doing routine much easier and faster from the tricks you can learn about doing things.

    Same on the KLR. Lots of knowledge out there.

    Tech days ARE also about community and friends, as Hondo says. It's nice to have help doing some things and get to know fellow KLR riders.
    Example:
    Some owners are not comfortable with electrical stuff .... so the tech day might cover installing heated grips or a fuse block, or a BMW style plug or what ever.

    Next one will be with a suspension guy (usually a pro) He helps four or five guys tear into their forks, replace springs, install Race Tech emulators, fresh oil, or different spacers. Maybe even drill some holes if your brave enough!

    These tech days are great. I had help on the Doo hickey job way back on my '98 KLR. Happy to get it sorted out .... "with a little help from my friends".
    Had tech days on my VFR Honda too. Unreliable? uh, no. But always something to learn on every bike.

    The KLR is really a "different" bike when some simple upgrades are done. Most are not expensive. I've ridden a few like this. Different bike! Do it once and it's done and the improvements are sometimes amazing. No big deal, after all, we are talking about Japanese bikes here, not old Brit bikes or BMW's:lol3

    Most any bike can use improvements. Suspension, electrics, Seat, Windshield, luggage, exhaust .... what ever. This is part of what we do. Spend money on our bikes!!! :clap
  20. RTinNC

    RTinNC Long timer

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    Then I guess you better run out and buy a Honda PC800. Most other bikes do require more maintenance than cars! Valves get adjusted, final drive fluid gets changed, throttle bodies and carbs get synched, brake systems get flushed more frequently, tires get replaced every 10,000 miles and on and on and on! Honestly ... if you really do not want to maintain your toy then a car may really be a better choice. And this goes for not only the KLR but most any other motorcycle. :deal