KLR250 thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Bad Company, May 10, 2008.

  1. nails1

    nails1 Been here awhile

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    Tuck and roll ... right into a tree.
  2. 8gv

    8gv Long timer

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    CT exile now in NH
    The diagonal log is often the victor.

    Slick, wet, barely attached bark on them is my nemesis.

    I go bushwhacking around them instead now that I am older.
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  3. javaman

    javaman Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    21
    Had to fix my holey radiator on my KLR250 as I could not find decent used one locally.

    There was 3 places which I had to solder - two at the top and one at the bottom where the neck connects to the hose. Corrosion from the inside

  4. 1994klr250

    1994klr250 Long timer

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2007
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    Location:
    Southeast michigan
    I started the tear down on my 94 klr engine, with 75,634 miles on it I was expecting more to be wrong with it.

    75634.jpg

    I de-greased it a few weeks ago as there was a lot of grime and dirt build up on it since I never wash my bikes! :lol3
    Up on the work bench getting ready to see why it's been burning so much oil and what's been making all the noise on the left side of the engine.

    IMG_20200417_142151662.jpg

    It's been 8,000 miles since I last checked the valve clearances, the exhaust have tightened up quite a bit. .005 and .007. It was getting hard to start the last few months. Camshafts, rocker arms all looked good with very little wear. The cam chain was quite stretched, when I pulled the tensioner bolts it was already all the way extended and no longer touching the aft cam chain guide. I'm lucky it didn't jump the timing.

    IMG_20200417_144040649.jpg

    The counter balance chain had visible sag and slop, since this chain only uses only the upper and lower guides for tension it had so much slop in it that I could lift it half of the sprocket. Both sprockets have wear to the plastic guide portion around the teeth. These sprockets are no longer available from Kawasaki so I got a set on eBay for $15 that are like new. I'm going to be putting in both new cam and balance chains, OEM from Kawasaki.

    IMG_20200417_151808524.jpg

    This is all of the plastic pieces that got stuck in the oil pickup screen from both of the counter balance sprockets.
    IMG_20200417_193422709.jpg

    The head looks to be in good condition along with the valves, but I'm going to put new valves, springs, and valve stem seals in it.

    IMG_20200417_161500080.jpg

    I got the head all cleaned up and just started pulling valves for replacement. Before I pulled the valves out I did a leak test of the intake and exhaust valves by pouring isopropyl alcohol in both the intake and exhaust tract and seeing how much would seep by the valves. Surprisingly there was only a little bit of leakage. Usually the intake valves on these engines take a beating. I make sure to keep my air filter clean and that the airbox to carb intake boot is seated correctly to prevent dirt from being sucked into the engine.

    IMG_20200419_124136391.jpg

    IMG_20200419_124029930.jpg

    The oil control rings are both stuck in the piston lands. They really didn't spring out when I pulled the cylinder off the piston, this is probably why it's been burning one quart of oil every 500 miles.
    IMG_20200417_162843894.jpg

    The cylinder is actually in very good shape, very little vertical scoring. I'm still going to have it bored over for a new Wiseco 74.50 mm piston. The wrist pin in the piston and small end of the rod was very hard to get out, as there is some small scoring to the inner bore of the small end of the rod. I'll be able to clean that up so the new wrist pin slides into place.

    IMG_20200418_194618772.jpg
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  5. nails1

    nails1 Been here awhile

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    Thanks for this documentation. My 1st-yr KLR250 only has some 20K on it, but I plan to go through the motor as you have done. For nothing else, to replace the crank bearings (no matter what condition they're in). Given unavailability of sprockets, new chains might be a good preventative maintenance.

    But so far, I haven't even heard mine run. (My shop will be build this summer!)
    1994klr250 likes this.
  6. 1994klr250

    1994klr250 Long timer

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    Location:
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    Is your klr a 1985 model? I've read that the first few years of the klr 250 had problems with the main crankshaft ball bearing coming apart with age. I looked at the parts diagram on ronayers.com and the part number is 92045-037 used up through 1989 and then kawasaki change the part number to 92045-1172 and used that part number thru 2005. I checked the cage around the ball bearing on my engine and it's still intact, bearings spin and feel smooth with no lateral play. I'm going to leave them in the engine. Just an FYI I swapped crankshafts on my friends 87 klr 250. I bought a used crankshaft on eBay, the left bearing is pressed on and the sprocket drives the camshaft timing chain and counter balance chain goes on after that so you will need a puller to get the left crankshaft bearing off. The right crankshaft bearing stays in the right engine crankcase and is held in with a retaining plate and 3 screws. When I did the crankshaft swap, I put the crankshaft in the freezer and then heated the inner bearing race on the right bearing and it dropped in no problem.

    Now that I know 75,000 miles is way too much on the chains, I would probably go 50,000 and replace both as a preventative measure. I really wanted to go 100k for bragging rights :lol3, but at the same time the amount of noise it was making I didn't want to blow the engine up and destroy everything.

    These pictures are from my last long trip on the klr back in October 2015 to the UP of Michigan, at almost 2,000 miles in one week it's a ride that I'll never forget. I just finished writing my ride report here: https://advrider.com/f/threads/i-dont-want-to-be-a-troll-living-under-the-bridge.1435716/

    Don't blame me after reading that ride report if you take off on a long ride to the UP of Michigan to enjoy the fall colors! :D

    IMG_7231.jpg

    IMG_7412_zps4onoubm2.jpg
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  7. nails1

    nails1 Been here awhile

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    New Mexico
    Yes. I might've even heard about that bearing issue from you. I don't know what PN, but I think they had a recall -- so any new one should be fine? I'll probably take case and parts to the local shop to do the deed. I want to mic everything and give it a good look-see. Even if only 20K. All I know is the oil is clean and those precious cams look good. I've never heard it run.

    I'll look at the guides/keepers and probably swap them now if I see any evidence of stretching. Thinking of protecting those parts and sprockets more than preventing a breakdown. Thanks for pointing it out.

    Why I'm also going to grind away the compression release.

    I recognized them. Thanks for your posts, throughout this thread.
  8. 1994klr250

    1994klr250 Long timer

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    Here's a few pictures of the wear to the plastic portion of the counter balance sprockets. With the chain getting slop in it it really took a beating on the sprockets. The replacement sprockets are above the originals, I got them on eBay since they are very hard to find from Kawasaki.

    IMG_20200421_180844385_HDR.jpg

    These are the replacement ones with very little wear.

    IMG_20200421_180251695.jpg

    Here's some pictures of the wear on the counter balance chain guides. The top one is the came out of my engine, the bottom is a used one from eBay, notice the difference in wear.

    IMG_20200421_175855880.jpg

    Old one on the right, replacement on the left.

    IMG_20200421_180020807_HDR.jpg

    The wrist pin for the piston had some damage to it, as it was quite difficult to get out of the small end of the rod.

    IMG_20200421_181630694.jpg

    I got a brand new Wiseco piston, rings, clips and wrist pin to replace everything.

    IMG_20200421_181708234.jpg
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  9. nails1

    nails1 Been here awhile

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    > I got a brand new Wiseco piston, rings, clips and wrist pin to replace everything.

    About how much is all that?
  10. 1994klr250

    1994klr250 Long timer

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    There's two different overbore sizes part number 4418M07450 and 4418m07500 I've found them on eBay for around $110, then you need a machine shop to bore and hone the cylinder for the new piston.
  11. trbjr

    trbjr n00b

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    Anyone have a spare kill switch for the 250? My switch broke off and I can't seem to find any online. I know the 650 switch works too but I figured I'll ask
  12. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer Supporter

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    Mar 25, 2009
    Oddometer:
    5,246
    No switch to offer myself, but . . . if you go 650, you might look for a Generation 1 part. The kill mechanism for KLR250s and Generation 1 KLR650s is GROUNDING ignition circuit power; KLR650 Generation 2s OPEN the ignition circuit to shut 'er down. Maybe both kill switches don't care and install/interchange identically, but . . . might keep an eye out for these differences.
  13. laylow3down

    laylow3down dirt bike mike

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    I might have one..
  14. laylow3down

    laylow3down dirt bike mike

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    all over the DMV
    IMG_20200326_190556_024.jpg over by the National Habor
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  15. javaman

    javaman Adventurer

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    Apr 23, 2009
    Oddometer:
    21
    Immix racing rear rack makes it very easy to build panniers with 2 hoops:

    greasyfatman likes this.
  16. 1994klr250

    1994klr250 Long timer

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    Rode about 200 miles of dirt roads in southeast Michigan today. The 94 ran great returning 60 mpg while spinning the little 250 at 9,000 rpm shifts.

    k1.jpg

    Spring is a little late this year in Michigan, it's been rather cold lately.

    k2.jpg
  17. SpaceApePaulus

    SpaceApePaulus Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 17, 2020
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Sheboygan, Wisconsin
    Hello all.

    About 5 days ago I picked up a 2003 KLR250 with unknown miles on it. The bike is definitely well-loved in a bad way, not maintained properly (he didn't know when the last time the valves were checked) and has some random "fixes" done to it (like a push choke instead of OEM), but it still felt solid. I changed the oil and oil filter right away, the oil was disgusting. The bike's performance felt a little better, and it was riding at just a couple MPH shy of the claimed original top speed. I thought that was pretty good.

    Everything was going well until yesterday. I was cruising around the dirt track and the bike suddenly cut out. It didn't stumble or stutter first, it was instant lights out, as if it was an electric motor who's power cord got clipped in half. When I kick the bike, the motor turns freely and there is the usual resistance, but there is a complete lack of the burbling sound a motor makes when being turned over. This makes me nervous. I pushed the bike up a hill and then down to try bumping it, doing this at least gave me back that burbling noise I expected to hear when kicking the bike, but it would not even come close to starting up.

    Since everything seemed solid on the bike, and it was an instant cutoff of power, I'm wondering if it could be something electrical related? I'm not as experienced as the majority of you, so please forgive my diagnosis. Does the KLR250 have a magneto? Would it suddenly turn off and the spark plug stop sparking if the battery died or a wire got loose? The kill switch on the right handlebar definitely needs to be replaced, but it was working just fine before hand so I don't assume it's the problem.

    Before trying anything serious myself or taking it is to the shop (I want to avoid this because those costs will be twice what I paid for the bike) I'm hoping it's a simple solution.

    When I recover the bike (it's a half mile away on the track and currently 100% of rain all day.... go figure...) I'm going to replace the battery, replace the air filter, and do my best to check over the electrical lines to look for corrosion or a loose wire. I don't have a voltmeter or many tools, but I'd be willing to buy them. I think my first purchase should be one of those KLR specific spark plug wrenches. Then maybe a voltmeter to look into the electrical stuff if simply replacing the battery doesn't work.

    I was having so much fun on my KLR250, I'm quite disheartened about this current situation, I always seem to find myself here with small motor toys. Any help would be so very much appreciated.



    Best,

    Paul
  18. greasyfatman

    greasyfatman Long timer

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    Battery is not related to spark.

    there is a smaller spark plug that works that is easier to install, off the top of my head I don’t have the part number.

    yes replace the air filter. When you replaced the oil filter was the filter tube present?

    my bike had some corroded connectors that made it fail to start. Grounding at the coil was in issue.


    Lets see a picture or two of your 250.
  19. nails1

    nails1 Been here awhile

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    Feb 21, 2008
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    New Mexico
    There are simple tests for spark, like pulling the plug, grounding it to the frame or block somewhere (I usually use vice grips -- gently!), and kicking it over (maybe have someone else kick so you can see the plug gap). You want to see a bright blue spark, but really any spark at all will probably tell you what you need. I bet you won't see one.
    You might even see a nasty gap, indicating that the lost spark could be secondary to something else like oil or jetting. But check first -- no point in going into what-ifs right now.
  20. SpaceApePaulus

    SpaceApePaulus Adventurer

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    May 17, 2020
    Oddometer:
    18
    Location:
    Sheboygan, Wisconsin
    Thank you for the response and the timeliness of it.

    I'll try searching what that spark plug could be, appreciate the tip.
    I have a UNI air filter on the way that should fit in the OEM airbox. if it was a clogged air filter I figured I would have noticed some decrease in performance before the bike suddenly and completely shut down, but I really don't know and it should get replaced anyway.

    If the grounding wire is corroded or the battery dies, would the bike continue to run, would it suddenly die?
    I'm starting to believe more and more this is electrical related and not mechanical.

    I should be able to take and post some pictures tomorrow once I recover the bike.

    Edit: Yes, the oil filter tube was present. Is there supposed to be a rubber O-ring that fits snug around it?
    Thank you,
    Paul