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KLR650 Only Thread......

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by willys, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. Fixnfly

    Fixnfly Not found on the book of faces

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    I plan on converting to tubeless with the outex kit and I ordered a Shinko 705 tube style.
    I was sent a tubeless tire from Rocky Mountain atv twice now. I’m being told that it “should work”.
    I just want the correct tire for a tubeless conversion not a tire that might be ok.
    From what I understand, our rims are set up for tube style only?
  2. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy Supporter

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    If the tire they sent to you is marked tubeless, then you're good to go.
    Fixnfly likes this.
  3. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    KLR rear rims have the safety ridges that make tubeless safe. The ridges help hold the bead on the right part of the rim even when the tire has low pressure.

    The tubeless tire has an additional coating on the inside to help retain air. This coating is not needed on tube type tires since they have a tube to hold the air. I'm not saying that air escapes from a tube-type tire that is used tubeless, but they're not made to be run tubeless.

    For a tubeless conversion, you want rims like the KLR has (rear at least, I forget what the front is like) and you want tubeless tires.
    Fixnfly likes this.
  4. Fixnfly

    Fixnfly Not found on the book of faces

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    “TUBELESS
    Use tube on tube type rim.”

    The current 705 says “tube style “ on the side

    Maybe I’m overthinking this?
  5. El Lobo Loco

    El Lobo Loco No matter where you go, there you are!

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    THIEF! :clap
    Yellow Dog likes this.
  6. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 49 years Supporter

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    Perhaps I messed up in this reply with 'converting to tubeless' = converting to Tubliss system? Nevertheless, I leave the reply in.

    Tubliss system seals the low pressure chamber in the tire. The seal is in the high pressure contact between the two annular rings running around the outer edges on both sides of the orange-ish inner thing that captures the high-pressure tube. The high pressure pushes the rings into the the little undulations on the inside of the tire to theoretically make a seal. That's why they don't want you to use a used tire with rim lock indentations. Theoretically, because wise installers drop some Quadboss sealer into the low pressure chamber through the valve stem.

    Consider a detail, however. Tubliss gets the best result with lighter bikes that don't mash the tires down under their own mass as much and ride rough at pinch-flat-preventative pressures. I find a very cush ride on my KLR loaded can be had at 22 psi, and unloaded at 18 psi. I don't use Tubliss on my KLR, but for sure do on my Beta 390, where I run ~10 psi in the outer.
    RunninRanger and Tsotsie like this.
  7. Bruce curtis

    Bruce curtis Indi scot

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    Sweet!
    Yellow Dog likes this.
  8. RunninRanger

    RunninRanger Rainy day Rider Supporter

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    After purchasing all the flat fix tools and soft panniers and bags to store all those tools and tubes, I'll stick with system works for me. I usually run 22 psi (F), 28 (R) in my tires if I'm playing in the rocks with my usual kit on Tusk DSport knobbies and I do just fine, thanks. Fixing flats is simply not that difficult nor that frequent for me. Just saying. I know....I'm old school.
    Bigger Al and AzMtnThumper like this.
  9. sasho

    sasho Dual Personality

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    3rd punctured radiator since 2015. Grrrr...
    I am suspecting interference with the plastic radiator guard.
  10. AzMtnThumper

    AzMtnThumper Been here awhile

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    True, but I end up fixing other people's flats but it's all good; it's just not that big of deal.
    ATflat.jpeg
  11. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy Supporter

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    By current, do you mean what is already installed on the bike, or the new one waiting to go on? Shinko does make the 705's in tubeless variants in the stock KLR sizes. If the tire that you have ready to install says tubeless on the sidewall, then you are fine. Some guys run the tube-type tire using the conversion, but I personally don't recommend it. Hell, I don't recommend running a tubeless conversion on a stock KLR front wheel due to the lack of a safety retention bead. A flat on that wheel at speed can get very interesting very quickly.
  12. Fixnfly

    Fixnfly Not found on the book of faces

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    The new tire waiting to go on says “TUBELESS use tube for tube style rim”.
    I’ve never seen a tire like that, it’s usually one or the other.
    Bigger Al likes this.
  13. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    I've never seen one that writes that out loud, but all tubeless tires work that way.
    Fixnfly likes this.
  14. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy Supporter

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    Not necessarily. Some of the high performance tires are placarded against using a tube due to heat buildup. Just more of the arcana available here at your friendly ADV one-stop shop! :lol3
    Fixnfly and HardWorkingDog like this.
  15. CliffElam

    CliffElam OldN00b

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    It took me four hours to change the tube on the rear of my KLR/250:
    - five minutes to get the wheel off
    - twenty minutes to break the bead free
    - hour to get the tire off the rim
    - hour to get the tube in right
    - 90 minutes to get the tire back on
    - five to get the wheel back on right

    Sooooo many opportunities for that not to suck.

    I can replace the tube on a bicycle wheel in a few minutes, dressed in lycra. Maybe it's my ATGATT loadout....

    -C
    motogoat likes this.
  16. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy Supporter

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    It just takes practice. The next time you need new tires will be an opportunity to work on technique. Dismount and mount the old tires a few times, using the tools you would use on the road. The peace of mind this instills is priceless. Ask questions here if you get stuck.
  17. HardWorkingDog

    HardWorkingDog Super Ordinary

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    Not bad for first attempt. MC tires are a whole 'nuther ball game compared to bicycle tires. There's a raft of good videos out there showing how to do it in a way that won't take 4 hours, but it still takes practice and some skinned knuckles to get there. Look for videos by Broc Glover. He's done a tire or 2...million. :lol3
    CliffElam and motobene like this.
  18. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 49 years Supporter

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    Yeah, motorcycle tires are an acquired taste! MUCH harder than bicycle tires. A KLR 250 and even the 650 are on the easier side given there are no rim locks.

    My first horror experience was trying to mount a Czech Barum knobby on a DT-1 rim (yes, I'm that old) when I didn't know much of the below. Took me forever, and I had to do it twice from pinching the tube the first time. I wanted to kill something!

    There are a bunch of tricks to to make tire work easier. Here are a few:
    - Warm wheels and tires in the sun or bring them inside before working on them, if they are cold
    - A tire stands is a nice thing to have at home
    - Lubricate! Use WD-40 or dishwashing soap with some water to pop the beads and de-mount the tire, then tire mounting paste is a great substance (a gel version of a soap-like substance) when re mounting, but other lubricants are fine (we always carry a small can of WD-40 for the dreaded field flat fixing work)
    - De-bead (both sides if replacing the tire) with your feet after lubing, and if that doesn't work use a bench vise of kick stand on a bike
    - Use long tire spoons with the flat-wide ends (the littler ones are fine when riding, but still more of a pain. On the KLR I carry one long-wide spoon tool as the main tool and a short one)
    - Push the free bead into the trough of the rim on the side opposite of the tire you are spooning off
    - Pro Motion bead buddy is a nice tool to keep the tire from walking off the rim (friends can be Bead Buddies too)
    - Coat the tube exterior with a film of talc so it slides around easier and doesn't have rubber buggers rub off when running lower pressures
    - Insert the tube with just enough air in it to not have it laying inside the tire flaccid, so you don't have a fold to pinch
    - Screw the tube stem nut on after inserting it to keep the stem from coming back out when inserting the tube
    - Always know what the tire spoon tip is doing, don't insert tips too deeply, and make your movements sloth like to avoid pinches
    - THE critical thing remounting is having the free bead opposite the working side in the rim tough!
    - Always spoon on the tube-stem side last

    What did I miss?

    Rim locks are an additional pain. Some people leave them on the rim when replacing tires. I take them out, then put them back in at the end step just before before spooning the second bead back on. A bad habit, perhaps. The nut has to go on and you push the bloody thing against the tube to not get it trapped under the bead.

    I'm coming to disfavor rim locks... or let me say, appreciate when they are not there especially if I have a field flat. They may not do all that much other than throw tire balance off. My previous experience riding KLR250s in rough terrain with Kenda K270s at lower pressures and not having de beading, and that Shinko 805 run-flat experience I had last month on a fully loaded KLR where I managed to run some miles flat off road and later on road without de beading made me realize that rim locks may be grossly over rated. Then again my flat was not catastrophic. It was a leak-down situation so the tire getting quite hot might have provided half a psi or so.

    Tubeless tires on tube type rims aren't a problem. Tube-type tires on tubeless rims are more of a problem from not fitting the lateral beads lock-steps as well, or so I've read:-)

    One of the tougher re beading jobs jobs is fitting re beading the second bead after fitting the Tubliss system to the front because the high pressure inner liner resists the tire bead from going in the trough. The rear has more room and is less of a pain.
    RunninRanger and buckthedog like this.
  19. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    ^^^^^ THIS THIS THIS THIS. If I haven't stressed it enough, this. You know you're doing this part wrong when you get to the last 25% ish, and just absolutely cannot spoon the rest on, it's stretched tight and impossible. That's when you stop, and review your processes up to this forced stopping point. My hands still bear the marks of me learning. Of course... my wife digs my many scars and tattoos, so there is that.
    CliffElam likes this.
  20. CliffElam

    CliffElam OldN00b

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    Sigh. That was my second motorcyle tire. The first was even longer on the side of the road. This was in my garage, AFTER watching a dozen hours of video.

    I got a little gizmo from Advance Auto to fish the valve through, which would have saved me 30 minutes. My hands are very large - I wear 3XL Held gloves. I would have made an excellent elephant obstetrician.

    Why did I do it a second time? Simple, I pinched the damn tube the first time.

    Thanks for the encouragement.
    RunninRanger and HardWorkingDog like this.