KLR650 Only Thread......

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by willys, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. baldman1

    baldman1 Long timer

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    Dry, just make sure everything is squeaky clean and flat.
    Late for the Party and KirkN like this.
  2. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    Happy Halloween! In the spirit of a beautiful day, and the recent aesthetic work I've done over the past couple of weeks (Wheatwacker and refurbishing my plastics) I set out to shave the seat, install some denser foam, and likely reinstall the OEM length dog bones, as it squats way too much with my wife or daughter on board. I was looking forward to it, but not everyone shares my enthusiasm for working with their hands (if they have any) IMG_8764.PNG I'm about 170 geared up and they're much lighter than that. Also the kickstand is a pita, being the original length. So, true to form, my "helpers" were mostly, you guessed it, useless. IMG_8749.JPG The foam was old and spongy-ier than usual. It's old. So I wanted a step as my wife and daughter basically stare at the back of my helmet. Also to lower it. Marked and cut. IMG_8723.JPG Looked a lot like sponge cake. Like strawberry shortcake kind. Tasty stuff. Then, placed some high density foam (a-la Walmart camping section sleeping pad. I IMG_8734.JPG I shaved the corners and spray glued it in place. I did get some much needed help at this point, much to my surprise. I guess I haven't taught him the difference between tape, sandpaper, a cat, he just picks up the closest thing. Unless I pet him, he gets anxious and starts picking up EVERYTHING...leaves, the cat, my jacket, my coke, it causes some delays. IMG_8763.PNG It was short lived IMG_8728.JPG Excuse the crap in the backyard. So, the hardest part is getting the cover on tight. Good grief, good thing I have unusually strong hands and arms. My wife digs it. It was tough to do, being honest. That means I was using poor technique. I recalled the best bit of wisdom I've heard...my Dad used it most of my life, and I use it with my kids... download (1).jpg , so I did. Doesn't look to bad from 3 feet away. 8 feet if you have good vision. IMG_8760.JPG Got everything buttoned back up. I went to find my WalMart seat pad so many of us have come to know and love... but it was otherwise appropriated and in use. IMG_8757.JPG Finally traded some cat food and petting for the cover back. All back together. Time to ride tomorrow!
  3. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    Note to readers: Buck the dog does not actually appear in these photos. He's like 15 now, and likes his dog bed inside. Only ventures out briefly. Man, that's going to be a sad day someday soon. Included is my other dog, and his best friend. Like the late great Paul Harvey (for us well-aged folks) would say... "and that, is the rest of the story."
  4. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer Supporter

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    With a stock cooling system, thermostat remains closed 'til reaching operating temperature,no appreciable circulation 'til the thermostat opens. Service manuals describe a procedure for testing the thermostat.

    I think your thermostat opens; otherwise, your temperature gauge would read in the far red region pretty soon.

    A suggestion, and this is NOT a "rib" (joke). Burp your cooling system. Remove radiator cap from cool engine; run engine 'til coolant circulates, expelling any trapped air in the system. Shut 'er down, top off the radiator, replace radiator cap and ride on. Air pockets in the cooling system can cause overheating.
    buckthedog likes this.
  5. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    XDragRacer is correct. Although a thermostat stuck "open" would make the bike take a long time to warm up.

    With it running and in the normal temp zone, see if you can feel both intake and output radiator hoses. Should be the same temp. If the thermostat is stuck closed, one will be hot, and one will be cool, as nothing is circulating through it. If you can get your hand in there, or borrow an IR temp gun at a shop, the rad may show, or you can feel) hot and cold spots, indicating a clog. Mind you, I had this happen, and I see you have the massive Exxon-sponsored gas tank, and not sure if this applies, but on mine, one of the rubber gas tank "pucks" fell off when I was wrestling my tank on, and got wedged into my rad fan blades. The fan couldn't turn on. Luckily I didn't burn the fan motor (or bike engine) up. I have no idea if this is possible with your tank. Hell, I don't know if it's possible with the oem tank. Haven't tried it.

    Last thing I just thought of... may need somebody with more experience with this chime in... Are our radiator fan motors polarity sensitive? Some fan motors can be reversed to act as "impellers" and spin the opposite way. They may only spin one direction, but it did cross my mind. Your fan might be blowing instead of sucking.
    WileyRTW likes this.
  6. CrankAddict

    CrankAddict Been here awhile

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    www.motocd.com and be done with it.
  7. kf7ja

    kf7ja Adventurer

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    What is a good keyed wire to get power for heated grips on a 2009? I have an Eastern Beaver fuse block, but it runs directly to the battery. I don't want to risk leaving the heat on and running the battery down. Would the low beam wire work?
  8. kf7ja

    kf7ja Adventurer

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    Nice Mosko Moto Bag. Is that a 20L duffle?
  9. KPfromCT

    KPfromCT Been here awhile

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    On my 2008 I took power from one of the instrument bulb wires. The low beam wire should work just as well.
  10. XDragRacer

    XDragRacer Long timer Supporter

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    The "mother" keyed 12 VDC wire on Generation 1s is a BROWN wire. I'd splice directly into that one for a high-current application like heated grips.

    Better practice, perhaps: Use lighter keyed power wire (e.g., license plate light wire, etc.) for relay control voltage; relay fused and connected directly to battery.
  11. Weaselope

    Weaselope n00b Supporter

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    I am a new rider, I am 5"10" with a 30 inch inseam. Is a KLR going to be too tall for me to learn on? What is the best way to take 2" inches or so off the seat height?
  12. KPfromCT

    KPfromCT Been here awhile

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    A couple days ago I posted about replacing my stock regulator with a Shindengen FH020AA MOSFET unit but also mentioned the fakes out there. On the right is the genuine Shindengen part, and on the left is the $22 eBay impostor. Since I won't ever install the $22 part it's going to give its life for science.

    IMGP2359s.JPG

    Epoxy potting isn't difficult to remove, especially if you don't care about what is under it. Heat and patience is all it takes. We're left with this:

    IMGP2363s.JPG

    So, what is this thing billed as a "Regulator Rectifier Kit Fit Shindengen MOSFET Replace FH012AA FH020AA"?
    The six components in two columns of three are diodes and are expected for a 3 phase rectifier. They're only 5 amp diodes though, so don't put this on anything with a big alternator. The real kick in the ass comes from the 3 large components up top bearing the part number TYN625. They aren't MOSFETs at all. Those 3 components are SCRs. This means some people are modifying their wiring harnesses to install a rectifier regulator that is at best equivalent to what was already in the bike. Buyer Beware!
  13. KPfromCT

    KPfromCT Been here awhile

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    I was hoping they were using the wire to energize a relay. I might be optimistic.
    bete likes this.
  14. WileyRTW

    WileyRTW Wiley

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    It is the back country 30. My only criticism is that it does not have the metal locking bar that the back country 35 panniers come with. I bought the security lock things, and while you can still loop it through the handles so that they would need to cut the material to get into the bag, i would feel better looping them through the metal bars. I have been locking them closed in the hotel rooms, and while not to worried as it is still secure, it would be a better system with those bars.
    Backcountry 35
    IMG_20201101_175824062.jpg
    Backcountry 30
    IMG_20201101_175837263.jpg

    IMG_20201101_175857593.jpg

    I am the same height and just bought a KLR that the previous owner lowered, but ride a WR250 which sits tall. At 1st I assumed I would hate it, but while I havent done any real offroad, I am loving it, especially to handle the weight of the bike stopping in the streets here in Mexico while loaded with bags. I say you buy a lower kit they are cheap, but keep the stock parts so you can swap back later when you are comfortable riding.
  15. beemerbum55

    beemerbum55 My Old 2004 KLR 650

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    If your carb fills with gas, it's the float and/or shut off needle it controls. Open bottom of carb, "slowly and gently" bend the small chrome metal tab UP between the floats, reassemble and fire it up. Again, be gentle on bending that small tab between floats. I had to adjust mine twice but good to go now.
    WileyRTW likes this.
  16. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    Look up about 3 posts.

    Shave seat
    Dog bones/lowering links
    Modified shock

    Make sure to adjust the forks an equal amount to keep your geometry similar. Personally, I'm going back to stock height now that I shaved my seat down. With my 1" lowering links, the ride sucks, even maxed out on preload. I'm 170, my grown daughter is way less, and the ride sucked. I know I need a better shock and/or heavier spring, but damn it was bad.
  17. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    I'd guess that a dirty float needle or seat is much more common than a mis-adjusted float.

    I.e. I'd clean it first and measure the float height before I started to bend and adjust it.
  18. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    I agree. It's not going to be bent if the carb hasn't been opened. I'm not sure how long the bike was running before his issues. He said it sat for 10 years. But did he go through it first? Did it sit for 10 and he's been riding it for 1,2,3,4 years? or did he put in a new battery and just go? Either way, pull the carb, do the job and be done with it. Hell he's in Mexico, there's few better countries to be in and have issues with a small, simple engine. Someone can just fix it for him.
    WileyRTW likes this.
  19. kf7ja

    kf7ja Adventurer

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    I don't think the Gen 2 bikes have the brown "accessories" wire. I will go with a fused connection directly to the battery or run the heated grips off the low beam wire. I have a relay, so I will use it to trigger the current directly from the battery or low beam. Thanks for all the suggestions.
  20. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

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    So, I have a problem with the wheatwacker mod. Since I also shaved my seat as well as having the tall windshield, I'm looking through the damn shield, which has a birthdate still on it of 11/24/2003. So, it's hazy as f*&k and I kept seeing shit in the road that wasn't there, had me all shades of unhappy. So, does anyone have a suggestion... I can, a) undo the wheatwacker, I guess "close up" the slice in it with some flat sheet metal instead of the wedge shaped pieces. It'd look silly, but it's a 17 year old KLR, I'm not on it to get looked at. I can work around that, or cut down that shield? I've gotta do something because today was a lesson in frustration and frankly, it was dangerous.

    One other question, as suspension is not my thing... I have 1" lowering links on it. I understand the leverage and all, but my (grown) daughter and I were out today on it, and the stock shock just SUCKS, even on preload 5. She weighs maybe 120, me 175 with helmet and gear and it was sketchy as hell. Felt the front end wandering allllll over. I likely will bump up my tires to 30/30 as they were around 22/24 ish, as I've been solo lately. I'll also check my fork oil. Head bearings seem ok. But that was really not a comfortable ride. Don't have the money for a Cogent or similar at the moment.