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KLR650 Only Thread......

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by willys, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. Dno

    Dno Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2021
    Oddometer:
    339
    Location:
    Nc

    Thank you I was thinking wedge screwdriver give some tension and lock down.
    Guvment mule likes this.
  2. Cat_Man

    Cat_Man Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2020
    Oddometer:
    28
    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    After discovering how much the mirrors were to blame for buffeting on my other K bike that's orange, I decided to put the Rottweiler mirrors on my KLR. So much better!!! I also cut my screen down by an inch.
    20210529_114032.jpg 20210529_114133.jpg 20210529_114320.jpg
  3. PhilTheBiker

    PhilTheBiker Sun Follower Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2010
    Oddometer:
    9
    Location:
    Western PA
    You've got some serious headlights! I bet that lights up the road like a UFO.
    TC1166 and PlowHand like this.
  4. van the man

    van the man Space Wrangler

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2019
    Oddometer:
    1,124
    Location:
    Okrahoma
    Did my fork seals a week ago. While I had it apart, I had some progressive springs that came with the bike from the po, so I slid those in there, too.

    20210522_135750.jpg 20210522_135816.jpg 20210522_135803.jpg 20210522_135834.jpg

    Thanks to my neighbor for letting me use his shop. We had them off, cleaned, and reinstalled in about 3 hrs. And he let me drink his beer!
    Now, if the weather would cooperate, I'd like to try out the new set-up.
  5. van the man

    van the man Space Wrangler

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2019
    Oddometer:
    1,124
    Location:
    Okrahoma
    Oh, and BTW, it was a bit tough finding capacities for completely empty, cleaned tubes. What we found, for gen1, was 420ml ea tube. Hope that was correct and it helps someone else with a future search.
  6. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Oddometer:
    10,300
    Location:
    Auburn, CA
    I measure the fork oil level rather than go by fluid capacity. A good place to start is 160mm from the top of the tube with the fork fully compressed and the springs removed.
  7. Late for the Party

    Late for the Party Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    170
    My '08 is at 29k, and I decided to take a look at the wheel bearings (among other things). I indulged my preventative maintenance voice, and decided to replace them even though the inspection method in the manual seemed to indicate they were healthy. I'm taking off on the full NEBDR in a few weeks, so I'm leaning forward on wear items.
    Once I pulled them, they looked to be in great shape:
    IMG-2176.JPG
    IMG-2178.JPG
    I've seen some fellow inmates who've found these worn in fewer miles than I have, but I was surprised at the condition of mine.

    I replaced them anyhow, with Tusk for the front and All Balls for the rear (RMATV didn't have the same brand in stock for both), sealed design.

    While on RMATV, I bought a replacement cush damper, and replaced it. This needed done, since it is the original and the rubber was cracked and worn.
    IMG-2177.JPG

    Also replaced the chain, which was due.
  8. Tsotsie

    Tsotsie Semi-reformed Tsotsi Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,772
    Location:
    South Texas
    Late,

    On my 08, that now has 107K, the original cush damper is still good. What was not good at the last check was the bearing housing in the sprocket housing itself. The bearing was good (not original). Had to replace the whole housing as the bearing was moving around in it. Check that.

    I had changed my wheel bearings with sealed SKF's a long time ago.
    ZachM1 likes this.
  9. Late for the Party

    Late for the Party Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    170
    Thank you for the advice, I'll take a closer look at that housing in the sprocket. I did not look closely at it when working with it yesterday. I was focused on the state of the bearings.
  10. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 51 years Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2013
    Oddometer:
    8,463
    Location:
    ABQ NM & Wichita Mountains OK
    If I encounter a wheel bearing that looks like yours, Late for the Party:
    Bearing.JPG

    ...I stick with them. Usually no harm done replacing bearings, if you buy better quality bearings. And how to know? The cheapos can look the same.

    I don't remove bearings from the hubs unless I am for sure replacing them, but carefully pop the seals off and inspect them. If the grease is dirty I hit the grease with solvent then air blast the stuff out until quite clean. Sometimes I pressure wash them in the wheels and leave them in the sun to dry out. If the grease looks like rust mud, I still clean them out and feel the clearance. I may have caught them in time. If the grease is clean I just stuff them full of grease and push the seal back on.

    What kills bearings is under greasing plus water. Too little grease = too much empty space, then all it takes is a little water getting into them to start a cascade of oxidization wear. If they eventually go dry, then the wear rate really tales off.

    Cheap bearings are often manufactured to be cheap, compromises materials and process control. The latter often translating to more clearance. They'll look like any other bearing but start out more clapped out than perhaps your well used original bearings are.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ABEC_scale

    Most factories typically volume-buy the better bearings, so if they are still good when I get to them I'll stick with them.
  11. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 51 years Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2013
    Oddometer:
    8,463
    Location:
    ABQ NM & Wichita Mountains OK
    I'll add to my bearings comments a learning experience incident from about 8 years ago.

    A friend of mine bought a used Montesa (Honda) 4RT trials bike. The bike was in my shop for shock service work. He showed up with an (major aftermarket brand deleted) kit for the rear suspension linkage and swing arm pivot, smiling for having scored so many bearing son the cheap. I thought no biggie, why not just replace with all new?

    At the first bearing swap I discovered zero slop in the original part and a whole bunch of slop with the replacement! I checked all the others. Same story. The sum of all the slop through the amplification of the linkage would have be significant felt slop up and down in the rear suspension.

    I thought ironic to spend money and expend labor to replace really good bearings with bearings nicely 'pre-worn' equivalent to 30 years of service life and abuse of the originals!

    I pictured somewhere in a distant smoggy city, some factory run by a mix of The Borg and the Farengi with wringing of hands and cackling.

    The kit went directly into the trash.

    The original bearings were full-pack re greased, and all was well for at least another decade of slop-free service!

    My friend assumed wrongly that surely the originals must be worn out. They weren't.

    That's not to imply that bearings any one of you bought were Borg-Farengi (we shall greedily and stealthily assimilate you and your societies through low-low prices), and pre worn, but it pays to know that bearings that are new and look-alikes to the originals may be in fact be inferior to well used bearings whose only original fault may have been too little grease.

    Please check for slop before default replacing bearings. While it's hard to measure axial and radial play, for roller bearings those two forms of wear can sum to felt cocking slop in the inner race. That's much easier to feel between thumbs and index fingers with the bearing out and seals off, but you can get a pretty good feel for wear sticking a finger into the inner race and trying to move it relative to the outer race. A typical quality bearing will have very little to no perceptible slop.
  12. Tsotsie

    Tsotsie Semi-reformed Tsotsi Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,772
    Location:
    South Texas
    KLR wheel bearings only have seals on one side. I prefer double sealed bearing sets. I also prefer to get bearings made by the likes of SKF, Timkin and NSK if possible. Obviously more expensive but from long standing and reliable manufacturers .

    Whomever the supplier to the KLR Thailand factory was, some bad sets were installed from the 08's. I have had 2 bearings go. One, the rear balancer shaft bearing inside the cases behind the alternator and then the transmission output shaft right roller bearing behind the clutch.

    The issues in my above posting about the rear sprocket housing was not the bearing, but the housing itself. That had opened up where the bearing sat a few thou.
    motobene likes this.
  13. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 51 years Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2013
    Oddometer:
    8,463
    Location:
    ABQ NM & Wichita Mountains OK
    Thailand has become a powerhouse of motorcycle manufacturing. So far no bad bearings on my Thai KLR. Fingers crossed.
  14. Late for the Party

    Late for the Party Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    Oddometer:
    170
    Thank you for the all the input. I wish I'd have read through these before my re-assembly.

    After checking the rear sprocket housing seat, which was clean and healthy with no corrosion / wear, I installed the bearings with no real trouble.

    I did not, however, carefully inspect or scrutinize the replacement bearings, since I assumed Tusk and AB were of sound quality and tolerances. Those brands may be fine, but I should have done more than a cursory glance coming out of the package before installation. Looking at this the day after, going with Timkin or SKF (I'm familiar with the Timkin name from previous work on vehicle suspensions) would have been perhaps more prudent.

    My plan moving forward is to inspect the bearings for wear and I'm prepared to replace them as soon as needed.

    The good news is that my son's '09 only has 16k on the clock, so when this project comes around for his bike, my 08 will have served as a lessons learned opportunity.

    Again, the wealth of knowledge on this board has been indispensable.

    All good for now, and I'm off for some NEBDR shenanigans come mid-July!
  15. Gravis1982

    Gravis1982 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    May 31, 2019
    Oddometer:
    172
    Location:
    Edmonton
    bumpy and very fast gravel roads for a week, muffler cracked right under the airbox, melted a walnut sized hole in it. Find the place on the air box on a gen2 klr that is closest in distance to the muffler, thats where the hole is.

    Do I fix this (replacement airbox is hella expensive) or just treat it as an airbox mod? My only concern is, water intrusion.
  16. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2005
    Oddometer:
    8,085
    Location:
    Maine, USA
    I've heard of holes on the carb side of the air filter. No question those should be fixed.

    You can also fix any hole in an airbox. This is just my airbox door, but it's the same plastic throughout. A PO cut holes in the airbox door and left the cutout pieces in the airbox. I just used a soldering iron to patch one back in place. Like you, I simply wanted the water level higher before it caused trouble. You can see the soldering iron marks easier on the inside but the patch is visible on the outside too.

    AirBoxDoorInside.JPG AirBoxDoor.JPG
  17. Guvment mule

    Guvment mule Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Oddometer:
    263
    Location:
    Cotton Fields of Mississippi
    Ibeen doing that for a few years now on my 05, couple times a year i just pop the side cover off take a screwdriver and take out any slack. takes about half hour to do.
  18. kf7ja

    kf7ja Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2015
    Oddometer:
    95
    Location:
    Washington State
    I managed to burn two holes in the clean side of the airbox and it fried my 685 top end. The Leo Vince slip on exhaust was not on far enough. Heat from the junction at the header did the dead. I got a good airbox from eBay. I made a heat shield out of a piece of aluminum sign and insulated it with exhaust wrap glued to the aluminum. Eagle mike said that idling too long can burn holes. Now I start my bike and let it run for less than a minute; time to put on gloves and my helmet. Hopefully the pattern I made will help someone.

    Attached Files:

  19. KPfromCT

    KPfromCT Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2020
    Oddometer:
    149
    Location:
    Connecticut
    I changed the spark plug in the KLR this morning for no other reason than it felt like the time to do it. It's an NGK DPR8EIX-9 I installed 26,000 miles ago and so was the new one, which is from the same batch as the old one. You can see that the old center electrode is fine, and being iridium it would last much longer. The ground electrode is showing some erosion due to being made of more ordinary stuff. The bike was running perfectly but I don't know how much longer that would have been so.

    26k miles doesn't sound like a lot when our cars routinely go 100k miles on plugs. The ignition trigger on a KLR is on the crankshaft though and so it's a waste-spark system, firing the plug twice as often as is necessary.

    IMGP2383sc.JPG
  20. bearcat1

    bearcat1 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2006
    Oddometer:
    421
    Location:
    Olympia, WA
    I never gave it much thought about the pulse trigger, but good point.