Ktm 500 as ultra lightweight ADV bike suspension?

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by rcers, Oct 2, 2020.

  1. duggram

    duggram Sunrise Bahia de LA Supporter

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    I had a T700 for about 3 weeks. I dropped in the mud a couple of times. Even though it had OEM crash bars both the right panel and tank cover got broken corners. Cost $400 to replace. I also have a 701 that I was going to sell to help pay for the T700. The day I had a buyer for the 701 I decided to sell the T700 and made a little profit. The 701 has a few more horsepower and is 80 pounds lighter. Off road was no contest. Good luck with your T700.
    #61
  2. Chalk

    Chalk Been here awhile

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    Is that 2 pound on each side?
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  3. timeOday

    timeOday Long timer

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    Trailering to a day of singletrack vs. riding 400 miles in a day is too wide a span to cover WELL with any one bike.
    You could do it better with two bikes costing the same in total as one new 500 EXC.
    But if you MUST do all that with one bike for whatever reason, a 500 or 501 is the best choice. A 500 can do it all, the 300+ mile days will just suck. But an ADV bike cannot ride the singletrack / sand /mud in the same way at all.
    #63
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  4. chilejack

    chilejack Viajero Viejo

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    Addressing your initial question regarding rear spring. Set your sag and check your static side with all your normal riding gear on. If you are able to get rider sag and static side within spec without using all the preload adjustment, your spring is ok. When you are doing a road trip, load the bike with the amount of weight you will carry along with you and your gear and reset your sag. As mentioned above mark the adjuster position for both cases. If you are unable to bring both rider and static sag to within spec, you will need a different spring.

    Also +1 on Tubliss. I have used them for 5 years with no problems. They do require considerable wheel weights to balance for pavement use, even with Ride-on in the tires. I use valve stem caps set for 105 psi that change color as the pressure drops. I have a connector wired to the battery for a small portable air compressor so I can drop pressure for dirt and air up for highway.
    #64
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  5. JP4

    JP4 Thumper Geek

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    If you're asking about the handle bar weights, it's one pound on each side. It seems like a lot, but then I was considering Flexx bars as the next step, and those aren't exactly light. I went from tingling hands for hours after a ride to pretty darn smooth.
    #65
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  6. duggram

    duggram Sunrise Bahia de LA Supporter

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    What are you asking?
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  7. Fast1

    Fast1 Twisted Throttle

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    bar end weights that were added.. what was the weight?
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  8. JP4

    JP4 Thumper Geek

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    One pound each side. Or a Grande Latte in each hand, for the BMW guys
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  9. nzrian

    nzrian renegade master Supporter

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    I have never ridden a T7, so i can't advise you on their differences, but the 500 is an awesome bike in the twisties.

    I broke my 500 engine in on a 2000 km tar ride, i put dunlop 605 on the front and rear though, passed a lot of harleys in the hills and had no trouble staying with sport bikes untill the long straights, which were a bit tedious.

    the 500 is a true do it all i reckon.

    IMG_20191025_181826.jpg
    #69
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  10. duggram

    duggram Sunrise Bahia de LA Supporter

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    @Kshaw I should have posted this sooner. I do have thoughts of going back to a 500. This '17 FE501 was very good to me. I road it to Deadhorse from Fairbanks about a thousand miles with not issues. I moved up to the 701 from this but I do miss the 501. This pic is from Coldfoot Camp about halfway.

    Coldfoot.jpg
    #70
  11. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    I did a 300 mile dual sport day back when I first got my 525. That was before I even had the Renazco seat. It wasn't bad except for the miserable stock seat. The worst part was finding fuel with the stock 2 gallon EXC tank. We called it the Lowcountry no gas stations passed ride. The seat and tank part sucked because my MXC tank was at home waiting for the seat they were three weeks later than estimated delivering.

    The bike itself was fine for that distance. But, then, I have never ridden anything but dual sport thumpers for my whole life. So my idea of a nice bike for pavement is probably different than somebody with street bike experience. I did balance the tires first. To me, that makes all the difference. Plus we took several breaks to shoot the shit, eat lunch, etc.
    #71
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  12. Kshaw

    Kshaw Been here awhile

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    I think I’ll end up with the 500exc over the Tenere. Main factor is I ride alone a lot, and the ~200lbs difference is just too much to ignore. Plus it’s even lighter than my wr250r by a significant amount.
    #72
  13. Grreatdog

    Grreatdog Long timer Supporter

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    Even my 15 year old EXC525 is only 275 pounds with fuel, soft bags, armor, and tools. I ended up selling my 640 because the EXC is simply better at everything and over 50 pounds lighter.

    I bounce back and forth between my bike and a friend's 690. I made the right choice because I ride in the mountains. He made the right choice because he mostly rides the coast.

    If I still mostly rode the coast like my friend, I would probably favor his 690. But weight really matters when it gets rocky, narrow, and steep. Not so much on level sand and gravel roads or forest two track.
    #73
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  14. nzrian

    nzrian renegade master Supporter

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    100% agree on the tubliss, works great, they do require a fair bit of balance weights as you say.

    IMG_20201021_180433.jpg
    #74
  15. Chalk

    Chalk Been here awhile

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    Thanks, I’ll give the bar weights a try. Just installing Tubliss at the moment.
    From memory 200grams is about the weight needed to balance them out.
    Any thoughts on cushdrive hub? Got to improve the vibration and extend chain and tyre life.
    #75
  16. Kshaw

    Kshaw Been here awhile

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    What is the best (most protective) skid plate for this 2021 500exc? Also, what other protection mods do y’all recommend? Also list how important they are, for example can you get away without them for a time being.
    #76
  17. Kshaw

    Kshaw Been here awhile

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    Anyone try the ax41 tire?
    #77
  18. Moto-Crockett

    Moto-Crockett Wannabe Adventurer

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    I’m about to join the 500 club boys!
    #78
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  19. RidgelineRider

    RidgelineRider Don't take life too serious

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    Awwwweee....Yeah. Abandon all hope, no turning back after that rear tire spins. Just did. 90 mile run yesterday. Baby heads, bed rock, fast twist gravel roads, 10 miles of beach sand wash and jumped on handful of miles of tarmac to driveway...all on one bike with absolute ease.

    Any questions on mods or options, just post the question. I’m excited for you. Hope the 500 checks all the boxes you have like it did me. Good news is, if you don’t like it, you can sell it fast on the forums or craigslist. Light bikes are making big come back.
    #79
  20. RidgelineRider

    RidgelineRider Don't take life too serious

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    Bash plate absolute must. I have a dense poly plastic one, it’s light, but works (TM Designs). Then I have a aluminum one on wife’s 350, hers has been lowered, so it’s payed for itself. This one is a must.

    I went with polisport (double check the name) clutch cover and stator cover (both sides of engine), very light, keeps engine from being punctured from brake lever, gear shifter or rocks. The engine is light, thus has thinner walls. Kinda not required, but I ride remote and solo.

    Rear disc guard. Good for rocky climates. Not too expensive and common vulnerable point.

    I adjusted both clutch and brake levers so the end handlebar will make contact with ground before levers will on dumps. Reduces chance of broken levers. Could go hand guards, but I like the freedom up front with just the bunny ears.

    Pack atleast a front tube (can be used in rear), 3 spoons, stem valve remover (can buy the caps that have them built in), valve stem puller, KTM tool kit (includes what you need to swap tires), manual (they make these crazy light and compact ones mountain bikers use) or 12v SAE electric air pump. Could go the whole tubliss route or Mouses, which is cool too. I don’t mind tubes, got good at patching them. Put most of this in front fender bag with some zip ties and wire. Don’t let this part worry you, I’ve put a lot of miles on mine to get the flats that I have gotten. When I’m doubt, keep Psi little higher if you worry about pinch flats.

    Tip: When changing new tires on 500. Always use the tools you carry in the field to do it. Especially the first time if you never done it. This makes you familiar with the tools and what you will actually need.

    Seat has been mentioned, but not required. If you are focused on your burning ass from the 2x4 stock seat, then you are not focused on riding and the experience. That’s just me, but you may have an iron butt.

    There are things like stabilizer, bags, headlight, etc, but this is more specific to riding style and needs. Down the road type stuff and can go so many ways.

    I ride solo, very f***ing remote with tools and a Garmin inReach. The 500 is great for this since the bike is easy to get you through or back out of gnarly stuff without a pucker moment. Let me know when you are ready for the GPS rabbit hole. I’ve gotten burned by relying on phone as primary too many times.
    #80
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